* Posts by Chika

1063 posts • joined 2 Oct 2007

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Honor 7 – heir apparent to the mid-range Android crown

Chika
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Re: I have an Honor 6

Yep. Can agree with all that - I've had an Honor 6 since the start of the year and the only real gripes I have about it is the fixed battery (I absolutely hate that in any phone) and the EmotionUI. The power side of the 6 isn't spectacular but I did a bunch of stills and video clips at the weekend on a 55% charge and just about got away with it. From the looks of it, the case for the Honor 7 doesn't have that clock/music control window that the 6 has. Maybe something for the future?

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Windows 10 blamed (partly) for stalled PC sales recovery

Chika
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Re: El Reg agenda

I know it ate my hamster...

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To be honest, I doubt that Windows 10 will make a huge difference to the market until the Enterprise version starts making an appearance and even then it's likely to be slow to move given the huge effort in recent times that was put into getting the corporate world off Windows XP and onto WIndows 7 or 8. The lack of real movement in PC design would make it harder still as the corporate IT section will look to maximise the use of its existing tin, so it's possible that Windows 10 will only make it in as a possible replacement when the existing iron has reached its end of life. With Windows 7 still in extended support until 2020, you could see little change overall before then.

As for the home market, go fig. Microsoft have never been brilliant at predicting the next shift there - they got lucky a few times, that's all. Indeed forcing down people's throats could be a bad move, negating any benefit of a "free upgrade". I guess we'll find out for sure come next July...

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Net neutrality: How to spot an arts graduate in a tech debate

Chika
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Re: Flufflepuff!

This'll do it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQWhJrkgXII

(\

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High-heeled hacker builds pen-test kit into her skyscraper shoes

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Re: Clever..

"Give her a body cavity search. Go deep and hard..." - Paraphrased from Beavis & Butthead Do America

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Směrť Špionam! BAN Windows 10, it SPIES too much, exclaim Russians

Chika
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Facepalm

I suppose I should have seen this coming...

I don't suppose China has had anything to say about Windows 10 yet, have they?

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Twenty years since Windows 95, and we still love our Start buttons

Chika
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Re: Windows 95

1) A waste, they should have put the effort into NT (first released in 1993). It set back the PC industry by nearly 5 years, destroyed NT Security (people writing 32bit programs and ignoring security settings because only NT used them), it killed the Pentium Pro (no easy return to 16 mode)

Considering how NT progressed at the time and how poorly W3.1 was taken up outside the business world, I suspect that this couldn't really be avoided.

2) Autorun was the stupidest thing ever.

Agreed. An obvious bug hole waiting to happen. Those were happier times though...

3) The Entry level spec wasn't enough memory to have TCP/IP, Word and Browser at same time.

The hardware upgrade path. And they wonder why people looked at the "Vista Ready" campaign fiasco and said "Toldya!"

4) The first version had no USB.

Not surprising. USB was a comparatively new technology back then and not that much hardware supported it.

5) It was really just WFWG 3.11 with Win32s, VFW, and 32bit disk driver all bundled with a new better shell, but file explorer was inferior to File manager has STILL has some of the same bugs/stupidity, like you have to hold shift or control to be sure to Move or Copy, if you lose track of which drives which folders belong. Still Explorer file copy is primitive compared to xcopy. Why are overwrite options broken and can't be set at start? Why no copy only newer etc. Only NT3.5 was a real 32bit Windows.

I suspect a bit of a bias here in some parts. Mind you, you did know that File Manager and Program Manager were still there in W95, didn't you?

6) Office 95 deliberately used specially invent APIs to stop it running on WFWG. Which made it fail on true 32bit NT 3.5, so they brought out NT3.51 with later tech preview of Exporer Shell.

You can blame Microsoft for that. They do this so often.

7) They added the worst bits of Win95 (and later Win98) to NT4 .0 (and later Win2K and XP)

Care to be specific?

8) The "Start" button should have been called Main, Main Menu or Menu. Start is stupid, as in many cases it was only used most days to "shut down".

No, here I certainly disagree. "Start" was a good idea since it was where everything started, including the shutdown routine. Yes, I've heard the joke about Windows needing to Start in order to Stop but the idea of calling it "Main" or something like that is too vague to be useful.

9) Ran 16 bit code natively instead of on a VM like NT. (NTVDM and NT WOW)

I can see your bias showing! Actually, WOW does have its drawbacks and you have to remember that a lot of companies were running software that didn't sit too well unless you had full 16 bit support. As time went on, this improved so that WOW became a more reasonable option but when W95 came out it worked out reasonably well.

10) Could only connect to named Pipes. Couldn't create Named pipes. The stupidest 32bit / NT feature to omit. Forces use of COM and shared memory evils instead.

Yes, I can see this one. Indeed one bit of software inflicted this terror on me comparatively recently.

Later "Personalised Menus" and desktop clean up and hiding icons in Task Tray was UTTER stupidity as then how do you find the less used things or even know they existed.

Not sure that I follow this one.

GUI only went down hill after the initial improvement of using the desktop better than previous "Program Groups". The nadir being ribbon and then making buttons/menus look like ordinary text. Stupid on windows, web and Kobo. Where the hell you supposed to click/touch?

You mean https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTYet-qf1jo

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Chika
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Re: I preferred 98

I think 98 cleaned up on most of 95's deficiencies

To an extent, yes, but I preferred the second edition of W98. It was a lot more stable than the first edition IMHO.

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Re: while enabling ... the Windows Store

To an extent, I don't disagree with you but I would point out a couple of things that may temper what you say about this.

First of all, I'm not that familiar with Mint's install though the last time I fiddled with a Mint distro (I think it was Nadia) it was fairly minimal. I'm not sure if that's the right way to go - I've always preferred the openSUSE install or possibly the CentOS install. The trouble is that too many people decide to pitch on a particular distro because it's the current flavour of the month (before Mint it was Ubuntu, for example).

Secondly the jargon used in Linux isn't that much worse, when you get down to it, than the jargon used in Windows. It's just that many users are more used to the Windows brand of jargon, so they know what a zip file is where they don't recognise what a tarball is, or they know how to elevate themselves to administrator level but have no idea what su or sudo are used for. Yes, some of the terms are pretty old but not all of them are meaningless; it's just a matter of doing a little research.

Finally, yes, I can agree that some applications, those that aren't pulled into your system using whatever you use for a package manager (I know that it's based on the .deb system on Mint but the name escapes me right now), can be a pain to install but many of them follow a simple pattern. You start with the configure script followed by the make or make install command. It's not uncommon for the application in question to even give instructions for installation.

When you are new to a system, or you haven't used a system in a very long time, it can take time and patience to sort everything out. I daresay that if I was presented with the CLI from a PDP11 right now, having not touched one for over twenty years now, I'd be a bit clueless right now until I got myself straight. The same could also be said for somebody that hadn't touched a Windows machine since W98 but had to now make sense of W10.

It's the main reason, I suppose, why I am curious about all these commenters that have said that they would switch to Linux, how many have done it and whether any of them have switched back.

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Chika
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Linux

Re: while enabling ... the Windows Store

I've seen so many comments in the various W10 stories where a commenter states that they are shifting to Linux instead.

I use both Linux and Windows, but this actually leads me to wonder how many of those that have said that they are shifting to Linux have actually done it? Generally speaking there's more to it than just downloading a distro - you need to also consider what you actually use your system for so that you can select the software that you will need, either running a Windows application under Wine or using an alternative version for Linux or finding an application to replace something that you need.

Believe me, I've been down that path and I've often said that I would like to see the back of Windows altogether, but there's always something that sods me up, usually because a bit of software I use needs Windows because the developer has decided to lock themselves into that ecosystem and there's nothing equivalent available.

Thankfully that situation is improving so I suspect that other than work, the days of Windows on my own systems are numbered but it's still an interesting thought.

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Chika
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Alert

The question of why the public accepted a substantial user interface change in Windows 95, but not in Windows 8.

Actually, there were a couple of reasons why W95 didn't cause as much aggro as W8 did. First of all, bear in mind that W3 was not the huge powerhouse system in the home - in fact the number of different computer systems and operating systems was quite staggering back then. Also consider that some were CLI based and the ones that actually were GUI based, say RISC OS or AmigaOS, already made W3 look a bit cumbersome. As far as business was concerned, well they were fine as long as it ran their software. Considering that some of the underpinning of W95 was lifted from W3.11, that wasn't such a problem though I do remember the issue with some drivers caused some moans at the time (but don't they always?)

The second reason, however, was that the new interface on W95 actually was somewhat more intuitive than W3 was. That isn't to say that it was perfect, but it included a number of features that were to last for many years afterwards, not just on Microsoft GUIs but on plenty of other GUIs, for example more than one Linux GUI resembles this same layout, from the start button to the menu layout and dialogue boxes.

Problem solved, Windows 8+ are shite (bar m.e. as that was a big festering pile of dogshit)

Generally speaking, I tend to view the whole business as trying to dress the system up to be something we have no need of rather than just concentrating on improving what is underneath. And even there we have a difference of opinion about what actually constitutes an improvement.

Windows ME could have been a real improvement on W98SE but for the fact that Microsoft spent too much effort on trying to get WME to do things that W98SE users could accomplish in DOS or with third party add-ons and that they placed too much importance on releasing an operating system to commemorate an arbitrary date. This is the sort of thing that happens when marketing gets too involved.

What happened to Windows 9?

Apparently it was due to come out but Germany said no to it. ;)

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Chika
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Trollface

Re: Re ?NSFW

Come again?

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Chika
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Hmm... wasn't Bob Rivers also responsible for the ACDC rip "Dirty Deeds Done With Sheep"?

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Does Linux need a new file system? Ex-Google engineer thinks so

Chika
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Re: "Does Windows need a new file system? Too bad, deal with it."

I'd forgotten about that! I think I last used Paragon on a W98 box (I might still have the install floating around on one of my drives somewhere).

As for the rest, I'll keep quiet as I avoided btrfs on SUSE after reading so many horror stories about it...

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Fanbois designing Windows 10 – where's it going to end?

Chika
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Happy

Re: Why call the July release 'Windows 10'?

What seems daft is naming the July build 'Windows 10', because if its free/or with special discounts for 12 months there is absolutely no need to officially name it 'Windows 10' (the name that could stick/be associated to a bad first release) during the launch period.

This seems to be an excellent idea for a comp! Anyone want to come up with an idea for an alternative name for Windows 10? (Hey, I did my part with "Windows as a Disservice"! It's somebody else's turn!)

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Chika
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Unhappy

Re: So...

Somebody exploded my tish!

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Re: So funny

Generally, I'm more interested in what appears inside VLC rather than what it looks like as an application.

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Chika
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Re: render unto caeser that which is his

I say let the shills and fanboi go ahead and they can congratulate themselves at the result whilst the rest of the world escape to reality.

I daresay they'll do that without any bidding.

If businesses continue to feed the MS cashcow then they can enjoy being the blind following the blind and everyone else will be happy when they finally walk off a cliff.

Actually I can see a flaw in that argument, but I'll leave that for now.

Lets look as windows benefits

Ooo goody!

1 compatability sadly there are now many more systems running a flavour of unix than windows so asside from games windows users are living on a desert island.

I'd be interested to hear where you got your statistics from. Yes, compatibility is a problem but only for those actually trying to run a specific item from a platform different to the one the application was designed for. Even there the problem isn't quite as big as it was even a decade ago except for those few for whom a degree of lock in is actually part of their modus operandi. Even with games, the increasing interest of companies like Steam have changed the previous dependence on Windows somewhat.

2 Easy of use/staff training costs again MS have chosen a radically different interface that hides OS dialogues from the user, I would suggest this means more UI type support calls and associated employment of even more semiskilled windows zealots to explain why it was necessary for the productive user to not know what their computer is doing when they are logged in.

That's true to an extent. Certainly the changes made at Windows 8 were a cause for concern in that respect and while Windows 10 has brought a degree of reversion on the poor choices made by Sinovsky, there are still some concerns. Having said that, it's all down to how much change there is and how much of that change is really relevant to the end user.

In my own experience of shifting Windows XP users to Windows 7, for example, there was very little to do for the majority of users. As long as the applications they used were on the desktop somewhere, the most they needed to do is negotiate the change to the login page (Microsoft haven't got this bit right since XP really, IMHO) and all was well. The only ones that got into a muddle were the power users that were expected to delve further into their machines and they were a fraction of the overall user base.

But that all comes from a single case and it's always difficult (and probably unwise) to generalise in these situations.

3 Cost of hardware, most business users employ their machines for browsing and opening,working with a standard office suit, all of which can be done on other devices and operating systems for a fraction of the price of a windows 10 system and associated infrastructure.

That depends on the case in question. Going back to my own example, the majority of the users I changed from WXP to W7 received new or replacement computers for a couple of reasons. I should also mention that you ignore the fact that many companies lock themselves into a Microsoft environment - not necessarily due to office suite considerations but where they will sometimes use bespoke operations or applications.

First, it made for a quicker transition and provided a degree of protection against the possibility that the new system might not have gone in correctly. If you get a problem, the old system could slide back in temporarily while the problem was resolved.

Second, this was an upgrade from Windows XP to Windows 7 and the spec of the XP machines was quite a bit inferior to the sort of thing that would run W7 satisfactorily for the purpose we used these machines for.

Again, generalising like this is a bit dangerous. A machine's age, spec and use are all considerations when upgrading and a new operating system does not necessarily require new hardware.

Conclusion letting the fools help MS to their demise is a good thing for everyone

OK, this is the problem. Microsoft has a large section of the world's desktop and server infrastructure and has had for some time now. If Microsoft were to decline, it could take a large amount of the commercial sector with it unless that sector had already moved elsewhere, whether Apple, Unix, Linux or wherever.

Suffice to say that I feel your pain but the whole Microsoft thing was pretty much in place as far back as the 1980s when they were still being pushed down the throats of the commercial sector by IBM to the detriment of every other computer/operating system company of the day. It's a little late now to complain about that much but as we are now we have to make the best of what we have and speak out when something comes along that is detrimental.

And yes, the "fools" as you call them have put themselves in that position but calling them names isn't going to solve anything.

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Chika
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Happy

Re: Orlowski articles

Probably because he attracts so many zealots!

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Chika
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Coat

Re: Not entirely sure why this has caused so much butthurt?

Well I know why I had so much butthurt.

I spent quite a long time testing Windows 10 on my laptop. And my chair isn't that comfortable. By the end of it all, Numb Bum Syndrome abounded!

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Chika
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Re: A novel idea?

Actually KDE (and most UIs) are designed by or at the behest of a committee (or whatever you want to call them) and aren't without their detractors. The difference is that most Linux/Unix UIs are designed to sit on a pre-existing system rather than being a part of the system itself so swapping UI is possible if you want to do it.

Goodness knows I've moaned about KDE's designs for KDE4 before this. And probably will continue to do so. But then I'm a miserable old duffer like that, really...

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Microsoft turns on Windows 10 file backup to Azure

Chika
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Re: Cabbage

I've been using various Linuxen over the years and have yet to hear that one. Mind you, since I tend not to subscribe (sic) to the idea that Linux == Ubuntu, I'm pretty much safe there.

OK guys, you got me! Like I said though, I hope this option doesn't become compulsory. (You know, "potential").

At least I got a few downvotes from this! :b

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Chika
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Re: Cabbage

Fair enough, yes. It's an option. I just hope it stays that way. (Please note that the word "potential" was used to describe this. Er... you do know what that means, don't you?)

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Chika
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Facepalm

Cabbage

Oh well. That's an additional reason not to "upgrade" then.

Another potential lock-in to Microsoft's eco-system, another possible security/privacy breach waiting to happen, another attempt by Microsoft to push its "Windows as a Disservice" values on its users.

I said this back when we were in the throes of Windows 8 mania - Microsoft just aren't listening. As a result, they are pissing away what little trust they had from its users.

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Flying Spaghetti Monster spotted off Angolan coast

Chika
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Cue a load of John Hurt impersonations

"Oh no... Not again!" - Spaceballs

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Chika
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Re: "Jones’s colleague Philip Pugh then nailed the creature..."

Huge what now?

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Chika
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Angel

Re: They call it an ROV.

"What the world needs now is rov, sweet rov..."

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Chika
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Trollface

Re: For years they were serving him incorrectly

Oh give it a br...

ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOTOAD

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Microsoft replaces Windows 10 patch update, isn't saying why

Chika
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Facepalm

Re: I'm losing track here..

Because with Unix you have bigger issues to deal with. The peers writing the code are too often amatuers who have no concept of testing. you are the beta tester so why complain when MSFT moves in that so-often-lauded direction?

My goodness, the trolls are desperate today!

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Chika
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Re: The last update was a mess!

You install, the update failed, uninstalled, re-booted, re-installed, failed, uninstalled, re-booted, re-installed, failed, uninstalled, re-booted, re-installed, failed, uninstalled, re-booted, re-installed, failed, uninstalled, re-booted, re-installed, failed, uninstalled, re-booted, re-installed, ...

A compatibility toolkit would be nice. Now where did I last see one of those?

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Chika
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Pint

Re: I'm losing track here..

Is it a wonder IT people drink?

Well, if you're buying... :9

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Chika
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Quite so. Personally, I have been dabbling in Python and never paid a single penny (or multiples either). Or you could always try one of the GNU systems (gcc is pretty popular, I hear). Just download a copy of Notepad++ or similar and a compiler and away you go.

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Chika
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Trollface

Re: MSFT's on a troll!

Just fixed the title for you.

Free of charge too!

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Chika
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Re: Those of us who haven't "upgraded"

Hmm, you've clearly not used it. IMO Win8 is an improvement on 7 with the caveat that you need to spend an afternoon sorting out the start screen (uninstall the crApps, create logical groups for your daily driver software etc) and learning some keyboard shortcuts (irony!). Use is exclusively on a multi-monitor desktop machine, no touch screens. It handles multiple desktops better than Win7 too.

Well I have used it and would tend to take issue with some of this. The question is, has been and always will be why you need to bugger about with the startpanel, winkey combos and stuff when W7 did all that in a relatively logical fashion (it wasn't perfect but it required much less frobnication than W8.x). As for multiple desktops, there I'd agree if it wasn't for some of the third party addons you could use to overcome this. (To be brutally honest, many of the Linux UIs had this trick down years ago!)

Now, I prefer it to the restricted Win7 start menu design. I realise I'm in a tiny minority here tho ;-)

I disagree with your opinion but will staunchly defend your right to express it.

I will move to Win10 soon at work so I can test out all our software with it, but it looks like they've adopted a 'worst of both worlds' approach to some of the UI :-(

In some ways, yes. It's certainly an improvement over the startpanel of W8.x but the cut down feel of the main area felt inferior to the classic menu from W9x/W2K/WXP and I have no use for the tiled apps at all which was why I was glad to see that Classic Shell worked on W10. With that loaded, W10 felt much better. If it wasn't for all the snooping and the compulsory upgrades, I'd probably have left it on my test machine.

I'm with you all the way on the 'flat design' shite though...

Definitely. My biggest worry right now is that a number of Linux UIs are beginning to ape this look and feel (example - KDE5 screenshot).

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Parrot drone pwned (and possibly killed) with Wi-Fi log-in

Chika
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The plumage don't enter into it. The only reason why it was up in the first place is cause it was nailed there.

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Chika
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Re: Pwning for the sward...

Look, it's not pwned, it's idling.

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Windows 10 growth flattens out to 30 per cent per week

Chika
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Re: Only 30% a week?

Been around El Reg long, have you? Apple and its fanbois get as much clobbering here as anyone else.

Some of still remember the Newton...

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Windows 10 PC sales boost? Don't hold your breath, say analysts

Chika
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Coat

Considering one thing and another, I can't say that I'm surprised.

The first consideration is how suppliers were stung over Windows 8.x. Yes, they did sell some but the sales were hardly spectacular and the fact that it is still possible to find PC builders out there who are prepared to install Windows 7 seems to confirm that. In fact, consider the huge numbers of Windows 8.x licenses were shipped for installation onto new PCs and you can see why they are less keen to put W10 on anything.

Secondly, consider that W10 is being shipped FoC. It is an extra step for suppliers to reload their stock with W10 so it makes more sense to leave W7 or W8.x where it is and let the consumer do the donkey work.

That's before we even get to the negative press that W10 has been getting over privacy issues, the compulsory update regime and the various faulty patches that have been a feature of the last couple of weeks since it was released. If that is a sufficient turn-off for potential buyers (which it could well be), it could mean that W10 could be a bigger failure than W8 ever was, no matter what the MicroShills say about it.

Wait and see seems to be the answer to most questions right now...

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

Chika
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No mention of male and female connectors?

Heh... well I do recall that some ICL engineers of my acquaintance some years ago would send diagnostic output to a file called testicl (I forget if they left off the last "e" or not).

Mind you, this was from a company that used to make a system that connected serial lines to its computers via connector blocks that were euphemistically referred to as "donkey wallopers". :)

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175 MILLION websites still powered by Windows Server 2003

Chika
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Re: Things look better than they did last week...

I can believe that. The site I worked at removed its very last W2K machine a little over a year ago and as I was shoved out into the cruel world of the job market they still had a sizeable number of W2K3, both physical and virtual.

Having said that, the techs responsible were getting their collective heads around W2K12 and were liking it immensely, though the software used on some of the servers are likely to give them a few headaches before they've completely finished so I could see W2K3 being around for some time yet.

Let's face it; some of the problem here is financial, some laziness, some technical/software related.

Mind you, since this article includes banks, institutions that still insisted on dial-up modems for some services until very recently because they didn't trust the security of anything else online, my money is on the stuffed shirt in the panelled office in some financial district somewhere with almost no knowledge of tech, a salary that would make quite a few impoverished countries salivate and a case of paranoia that would keep many shrinks in business for years.

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How many pre-loaded Win 10 PCs did disties have 7 days after release?

Chika
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Still in beta

With so much crud flying around about W10, it can be difficult to know what's what right now, but with a lot of the negative stuff being justified in one way or another, I suspect that OEM builders will be reluctant to sell preloaded W10 machines just yet.

It all points to Microsoft using this whole first-year-free thing as a beta testing scam on a potentially huge basis and OEMs aren't likely to want to sell on machines with bugs in them. They are more likely to sell W7 and W8 machines so that should the user "upgrade" to W10, the OEM can provide a degree of plausible deniability to any problem that crops up.

That's my theory anyway...

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Stardock’s Start10 brings the familiarity of 7 to Windows 10

Chika
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Flame

Re: You can't beat the free ClassicShell!

I used CS myself on my test W10 install after disabling Cortana, though I found that the latest version to hand at that point, 4.2.3, didn't work right. The previous one (4.2.1) did, however.

While CS or Start10 provide a workable solution to the problem that is the new Start, it would be nice to have something that took the work needed to cobble the system together into something that worked, didn't download crud that killed it in the background, didn't send a ton of stuff to Microsoft every time I coughed and didn't rely on sodding clouds.

What we actually have is Windows as a Disservice.

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It's 2015, and someone can pwn Windows PCs by inserting a USB stick

Chika
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Microsoft take hints?

Well possibly but only if they stand to lose actual money.

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FAIL: Windows 10 bulk patch produces INFINITE CRASH LOOP

Chika
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Re: 32 years

I feel your pain. I've used so many different systems as an alternative to Microsoft and each has much to offer, but the people that do the design and purchasing of solutions do insist on sticking with Microsoft, especially given the lock-in of some software that they insist on without giving anything else a chance because... you know... brand loyalty.

Actually I've been getting quite a giggle out of this whole article and its comments given that I posted a comment a couple of days ago based on a post on ZDNet which cited KB3081424 as knackered. I'm just glad that somebody else got to say "I told you so" before I did! Way to go, El Reg!!!

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Chika
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Re: they're barefooting, not using skis

Fonz: EEEEEEeeeehhhhhh!!!

Actually, couldn't we have a new icon for that?

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Windows 10 climbs to 3.55 per cent market share, Win 8.1 dips

Chika
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Re: Autoplay Ads

Yep. I'd also add BetterPrivacy and Ghostery to that list.

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Chika
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KB3081424 - The first busted update?

Sounds much like my experience, and pretty much the same as my response. It's especially the case as I've just been reading through another article:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-10-cumulative-update-causes-reboot-loop-havoc-for-some-users/

which looks an awful lot like a problem that haunted HP users a few years back on Windows XP! The problem is, of course, that you can't hide the update so you download it and effectively put your machine into an endless reboot loop whether you like it or not!

Told'ya!

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Microsoft to Windows 10 consumers: You'll get updates LIKE IT or NOT

Chika
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Re: I'll go for two months.

KB3081424.

Bugger! Not even twelve days!

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If you installed Windows 10 and like privacy, you checked the defaults, right? Oh dear

Chika
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Re: Windows 7 may not be a refuge either

FWIW, this guy says even Windows 7 is infected with this behaviour if you've allowed "critical updates" since April

Interesting, but incomplete. I did find an article elsewhere that cited this:

http://www.infoworld.com/article/2911609/operating-systems/kb-2952664-compatibility-update-for-win7-triggers-unexpected-daily-telemetry-run-may-be-snooping.html

This cites KB2952664 and possibly a couple of other updates (including an alternative KB posted for Windows 8). I just tried removing the KB from the machine I had set up with Windows 10 (and since reverted to Windows 7) and I ended up with some problems in the task scheduler. I wasn't too surprised.

The idea of a lot of hacking and slashing cited by the poster in Slashdot, however, doesn't yet give any details.

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Windows 10 Start menu replacements shifting like hot cakes

Chika
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Re: Windows 8 isn't a good comparison

By the beard of Zeus... you're right. I guess this is the tech news equivalent of the Angry Joe Show on YouTube.

Probably closer to the AVGN, I would have said.

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