* Posts by Chika

923 posts • joined 2 Oct 2007

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UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan

Chika
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Re: So fork, then

How many years did it take good coders to fix that clusterfuck?

You mean they fixed it?!? I normally switch it off for the sake of my own sanity at least.

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Chika
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Re: So fork, then

I agree with that, mostly because I fell into the same trap years ago with openSUSE 12.2 (12.1 was a waste of time as systemd was so buggy on that version and replacing it with sysvinit was the only solution). Since then systemd has crept like a huge slug-like creature into so many parts of the system including a mid-release change in oS 12.3 which killed a number of applications without notice. To this day I still keep 11.4, the last version of openSUSE not to have systemd in it and a bloody good version IMHO going in various places and may well do so beyond the death of its Evergreen support demise seven months hence rather than Poettering about with the broken dross I see more recently.

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Linux systemd dev says open source is 'SICK', kernel community 'awful'

Chika
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Re: What's to say they can't BOTH be right?

To put it bluntly, Poettering needs to be sure of his ground first before he criticises either LT or the community in general.

Having been on the end of a sizeable amount of work to resolve problems with more than one piece of software broken by the imposition and obfuscation of systemd (not to mention other problems with other Poettering outpourings), I've been less offended by the foul mouth of LT and others. As things continue, Linux is slowly turning into systemd rather than systemd is providing a service to Linux.

Of course Poettering can only shoulder so much of the blame - the various distros that use his work made a decision to do that. The people behind these distros are as much to blame here.

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Chika
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Flame

Oh how I've waited for somebody to back up my views on systemd. If it were any good, I wouldn't have half the headaches I've had with upgrades and installations over the last couple of years or so and any bad words from LT about this were, IMHO, well deserved. systemd is a great example of somebody rewriting from scratch something that already existed (and did the job reasonably well but just needed a bit of fettling) and now, because everyone + dog wants to be "up to date" (i.e. using the latest fad), it's headache time for everyone that has to use the damn thing.

I'd say more, but it wouldn't be safe...

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BOFH: Santa, bloody Santa

Chika
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Happy

Thank you

I have had a really shitty week so far this week. I needed this...

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BOFH: Capo di Capo, blah. I'm having CHICKEN JALFREZI

Chika
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I see the plunder seeds have sprouted, then...

Actually, my sympathies here are for the Boss. Who would want to be in the crossfire of that battle?

Or possibly the ultimate aim would be to kick the HR bods that pretty much started this whole thing. Fascinating!

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Happy 2nd birthday, Windows 8 and Surface: Anatomy of a disaster

Chika
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Mushroom

Apology accepted?

To be honest, this article sounds like an apologists' reasoning for all that happened with Windows 8. Yes, there were improvements under the bonnet but this ignores the fact that the main reason why people objected to its use was the wholesale change of the front end and the blanket refusal by Microsoft to provide any half way solution despite the fact that such a solution existed early in the development lifecycle. We heard the company chants of "cloud first, mobile first" and knew that all was not well. Sinofsky and Co. deserve credit? No freaking way!

This was just yet another example of Microsoft playing it safe when the legwork was being done by others, in this case by Apple and Google and their contractors, then attempting to swan into the market to try to cream it off. In that respect S&C don't necessarily deserve all the blame, but they can't avoid some of it.

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Ten Linux freeware apps to feed your penguin

Chika
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Re: Linux?

.deb != Ubuntu

I wondered how long it would be before that came up. Yet again it appears that an article written for El Reg has forgotten that Linux is not one source or distro but all of them hence, as was rightly suggested, Linux is NOT Ubuntu. Having said that, however, .deb, just like .rpm, is a packaging system. The code must be out there somewhere and if it is freeware or gnuware, a plain old tarball probably exists. Or...

I just had a peek... http://github.com/byhestia/springseed. Don't know if it would work on my openSUSE boxes but it might be worth a try.

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Chika
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Re: LibreOffice

I normally find that the malformed XML comes from trying to open the ODF file itself rather than opening a docx file converted from an ODF, though YMMV. There is a plug in for Office that allows it to open ODFs directly which has been known to save my bacon occasionally.

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Chika
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Re: Nice article

I can thoroughly recommend SMPlayer. I have been using this on various openSUSE machines since oS 11.1 and it has developed out of all recognition. I just wish it was as stable on Windows boxes as I'd standardise on it like a shot (for now it's CCCP and/or VLC for Windows, no contest).

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Chika
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Re: I'm a big fan of WPS Office

LibreOffice is not stable enough for business. Use OpenOffice instead.

I'd say quite the opposite, really. OOo was good up until the big split but one of the biggest problems I get with it now is that what it produces doesn't sit well with MS Office users. LibreOffice doesn't seem to have that sort of trouble and has been rock solid on many of my systems, Linux and Windows alike.

Any substitute for Visio ? Wanna sketch out my network.

Not sure. There are libraries that can be used to parse Visio formats but I've not really looked into what can be used as a front end for them. The closest I ever got were with graphical front ends for nmap or the mapping tool in Nagios. Not really sketch tools though. You could always consider LibreOffice Draw if you don't mind doing all the template sketches yourself.

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Chika
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Re: Amarok as good iTunes replacement?

Just recently I have been using Clementine which seems to keep much of what was good from Amarok in the KDE3 days.

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Chika
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Re: Please don't feed the troll.

But the poor thing seems so hungry!

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Chika
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Re: GIMP

Sadly that can be said for a lot of stuff these days. You could even say that GIMP has been gimped. Why is it that developers don't have the balls to actually say how bad systemd actually is? Or is it that they have been sucked in by the hype? We need an LT rant here, STAT!!!

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Chika
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Re: Hmm. Geany could be worth a look...

I liked !Zap but I eventually moved to !StrongED for some reason. As I recall, much of my text editing was HTML and I preferred the way !StrongED worked though I eventually shifted to Quanta Plus on Linux, usually running on KDE3. For much of my ordinary text stuff, I use KWrite, though I do have Kate installed and have dabbled on occasion.

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Sinclair is back with the Spectrum Vega ... just as rubbish as the ZX

Chika
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Re: RS-232

And are they going to develop a new version of the microfloppy to go with it?

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Chika
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Re: Where are all the keys?

Complete with rubber keys?

Goo!

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Chika
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Re: 1000 copyright violations

I really hope they have done their homework on this one. The whole business smacks of the Hyperkin Retron 5, a console that could play games from many of the old consoles of the 80s and 90s using emulation and control software that, so it seems, they should have asked about first.

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Chika
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Re: Indiegogo Warning

It does seem to be a software emulation on a 3 chip ARM board, but it looks practical in both cost and technogy.

Heh. An ARM board. Given Acorn's link there, this seems somewhat ironic.

The point is that given the number of Speccy emulators out there on so many different platforms, is there really a need for this?

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Chika
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Re: Kewl!

Ah yes. No doubt you are referring to that business with the Brown Boveri Company who took umbrage at the use of the term "BBC" to describe Acorn's beast back in the day, hence the hasty redesign of the logo on the Beeb. I think that company were taken over a couple of times since then so their use of "BBC" is likely to have lapsed by now.

As somebody else pointed out, however, there's still Auntie.

HEY!!! Who's been taking all my umbrage?

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One year on, Windows 8.1 hits milestone, nudges past XP

Chika
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FAIL

Cauliflower

OK, OK, I hear ya. Lots of Windows H8tred to be had, and I agree with much that has been said. As I see it, Microsoft are yet again under the thumb of their marketing folk and the beancounters that infest them, trying desperately to market their latest poop despite the poor opinion that is generally to be had of it.

The giggle I get is, and you can check back through comments I've made on this very site if you want, I can recall specifically stating that tablets were a fad. While I have nothing against tablets per se, the push by some for these devices has led to the development we now see in Windows 8.x.

The pressure to put everything in a server farm controlled by a corporation or other faceless body, euphemstically referred to as a "cloud", is the next fad and we can already see some of the effects on the development of operating systems (not just Windows 10 either) and some of the fallout resulting from poor design, poor security and the very fact that not everyone wants to be on the net every minute of the day. A good example was the suggestion back before Microsoft caved in that users wanting to play games offline were better advised to buy the XBox 360 rather than the XBone; W10 is the same thing, so it seems.

Until Microsoft stops doing things like this and actually starts listening to its users, that is unlikely to change.

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Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK

Chika
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Re: What an absolutely horrible ugly car

I agree that the B-Max is an ugly car (I had reason to consider this first hand at the start of the year when I changed my Ford Fusion, the car that the B-Max replaces, for a slightly younger Ford Fusion!) but that's no reason to remove the article. People won't know how totally ugly this car is unless they see reviews like this one or my own take on this -

http://mistie710.livejournal.com/92686.html

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BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?

Chika
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Re: Secretaries hate network printers!

We had a similar problem. The solution was to ask them what they needed the personal printer for then allow them to keep it, but only on the condition that they stocked and supported it themselves as the moment it failed, we would remove it and would NOT replace it. Very few folk took us up on that one!

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Chika
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Re: Purchasing live in a different universe

Not only are Purchasing living in a different Universe, it is probably the same one as all the people who decide IT Policy for HMG.

Can we blow it up please?

What, purchasing or HMG?

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We have a winner! Fresh Linux Mint 17.1 – hands down the best

Chika
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CFnM4SYQC8

Warning: It's loud!

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Chika
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Trollface

Re: Security

Ah yes. The world of the service desk has a word for this: "PEBCAK".

Problem exists between chair and keyboard.

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Chika
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Re: The article does say

Well, that's one point in Mint's favour in my book. systemd is one of the biggest piles of manure to ever infect Linux.

You'll have to excuse me - I don't have quite the way with expletives that LT has!

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Chika
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Re: Upgrades

Lucky you. To be fair, though, upgrades on openSUSE depend heavily on the hardware you are using. The machine I had 10.2 on upgraded fairly easily to 10.3 but 11.0 didn't happen without a shove due to hardware support issues and I eventually installed 11.1 clean on it to sort all that out. That system was decommissioned after that and the successor went to 11.4, the last version of openSUSE that I have been completely happy with. Personally I always prefer a clean install to an update.

There are lots of reasons why keeping your /home partition separate is a bloody good idea. That is one. :)

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Chika
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Re: mousepads...

I'm also an opensuser but I don't mind having a peek. My biggest problem is the intense dislike of KDE4 and more recent GNOME, so Cinnamon is certainly a possible contender for a replacement.

My only concern is for what lies underneath - the reviewer admits a Debian bias, so I'll be a little cautious for now but I would be sad to see the back of Zypp in favour of something inferior so I need to be sure of what lies within (given that this means Ubuntu, well, that's why I have my doubts).

It's one of the bigger strengths of SuSE; the adaptability and configurability (albeit this is something which the pushers of systemd seem determined to undermine) so whatever Mint has in it needs to at least match up with that. If it can, then I could be sold on Mint.

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New job in 2015? The Reg guide to getting out and moving on

Chika
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Oh, do I ever hear that one! I'm just being pushed out onto the job scrap pile with a similar set of credentials for the second time thanks to short sighted downsizing and I am finding the whole thing humiliating, depressing and degrading. My own thoughts?

Shoot all recruitment consultants

OK, I could go on with a whole plethora of niggles including ads that ask for over-qualification (yeah, like you really need a degree to be a phone jockey on a helpdesk) or give a shopping list of obscure application requirements, but that one thing would make it a whole lot better given the sheer number of RCs making a buck out of your job hunting misery.

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Ofcom tackles complaint over Premier League footie TV rights

Chika
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Re: Asparagus

I strongly suspect the teams in the prenmiership don't want to negotiate individually. They know the current arrangement allows a bidding war that brings in huge revenues.

I suspect that this is the crux of the matter. What you have here is, in effect, a cartel. OK, getting each team to negotiate separately or, at the very least, getting the league to negotiate games rather than seasons may be more bureaucratic and there may be losers in the short term but anything that opens up the games, especially the sort of games that would get less coverage under the current scheme, is likely to be good for everyone in the long term.

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Chika
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Asparagus

It's something I've been considering for years. It's a setup that nearly killed more than one channel while draconian blanket agreements ensure that some teams and some matches never get aired which means that a selected few will always get the lion's share of the pot.

By allowing the teams to negotiate rather than just the Premier League or the FA, it can mean that more channels can take advantage of live football, bringing more matches to the public and more revenue to the teams themselves. There are down sides to doing it this way but it stops the middle men getting in the way and stops larger companies like Sky or BT effectively exercising a monopoly position which benefits only them.

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NOKIA - Not FINNished yet! BEHOLD the somewhat DULL MYSTERY DEVICE!

Chika
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Re: Don Jolly - Eat your heart out

I hate that ringtone.

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PHONDLESLAB-ULOUS: Motorola Moto X Android phablet

Chika
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Re: Fixed battery!

Totally agree. My current phone might be creaking somewhat, it does have the ability to have a new battery and a memory card as well as doing much of what I want it to do. Every time I see a possible phone that I could change to, the spec lets it down by pandering to current fads rather than providing a good, solid phone for a reasonable price. £420 for a phone with a limited lifespan? Puh-leeze!!!

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Japan develops robot CHEERLEADERS which RIDE on BALLS

Chika
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Happy

Re: Defeats the whole purpose....

I would have thought the answer was obvious. You get balls.

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DAY ZERO, and COUNTING: EVIL 'UNICORN' all-Windows vuln - are YOU patched?

Chika
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Coat

Re: Doesn't Affect Me

ISTR Microsoft did release a TCP/IP stack installation which was usable on all versions of Windows 3.1. As I recall, though, the biggest PITA was NIC drivers back then.

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Most convincing PHISHING pages hoodwink nearly half of you – Google

Chika
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Re: Hardly surprising

This is hardly surprising considering that many well known financial services organisatiions regularly send emails to their customers, with embedded HTML buttons inviting them to log in to their accounts and, presumably, enter their login details.

Totally agree with this. In fact this practice is not restricted to financial organisations. Generally I tend to never click on an email link no matter where it came from.

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Microsoft snorefest: For crying out loud, Nadella – just channel Ballmer!

Chika
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Trollface

Re: "snore" "boring" "contradiction"

You want a commentard? Trouble is that it's 'ard to comment on a non-story like this.

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Got an iPhone or iPad? LOOK OUT for MASQUE-D INTRUDERS

Chika
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I hate to say it...

The moral of this story is one that most realists will know very well.

If a computer, regardless of architecture or operating system, is connected to something else, then there is always a possibility that it will be able to download something that disagrees with it.

Apple systems are just as vulnerable as anything else. If anything, now that it has so much more of a profile in computing circles, it looks as if it is gaining some degree of notice from those that wish nothing but harm to online users in general. Any Apple fanboi that thinks otherwise is merely deluding themselves.

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Firefox decade: Microsoft's IE humbled by a dogged upstart. Native next?

Chika
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Trollface

Midori anyone?

Heh!

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Chika
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Well if you are running Linux, you are used to patching and compiling your own kernels, as well as spending hours on a command line fixing dodgy software.

I run Linux on a number of systems and have used Firefox in all situations. Yes, I have compiled kernels and worked on dodgy software but Firefox has not been one of those. Only twice has it ever gone wrong on me and in both situations it was because there was a fault in the underlying system which, when repaired, resolved any problem I had. Yet again somebody is spreading FUD based on age old experiences of Linux.

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Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...

Chika
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Re: How would you tell Drive wasn't working?

wtf is Google + ? Isn't it just that annoying login (I refused to use) on YouTube?

Yes and no. Google+ predates its integration with YouTube, this integration being part of Google's attempt to push Google+ on users that clearly didn't really want it just so that it could attempt to rival services such as Facebook. Despite the fact that Google+ is no longer the product of the moment (in Google's opinion anyway), YouTube users still have to put up with it.

And, like yourself, I refuse to use it. It's bad enough that I have to stop all the other Googlespy services from grabbing my info on site after site without serving up my details wholesale.

Google+? Just say no.

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A Norsified Linux for Windows and OS X wobblers

Chika
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Re: You lost me at "no minimize button"

To an extent, I agree. I like KDE and don't really have much inclination to move.

I'm not in full agreement, however, and here's why. I use KDE3. Not 4. I do not like the direction that KDE are going in and for that reason I like to see what else is out there, whether it's betas like this or slightly more mature stuff like Cinnamon.

I like some of what this GUI has to offer but I'm not sure if they are necessarily going the right way either. I do like that they are trying though. If nothing else, it may eventually show developers at KDE or GNOME the error of their ways. Or not.

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Chap runs Windows 95 on Android Wear

Chika
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Trollface

Re: Win95 on a 386DX?

Sounds like what we did to a manager who complained that he didn't have an up to date PC even though we knew that he never used it or powered it up. We had a spare old 386DX knocking about onto which one of my colleagues at the time managed to squeeze Windows 98SE! We then installed it and waited to see what happened. (For the record, it booted but it was veeeeeeeeeeery slow!)

Suffice to say that he never even noticed!

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Chika
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Re: nice

Wonder if could port RISC OS, or Amiga OS for fun

There are a few RISC OS emulators knocking about and at least one Amiga OS emulator that I'm aware of. Whether they'd scale down to a wearable is another matter, though.

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Windows 10's 'built-in keylogger'? Ha ha, says Microsoft – no, it just monitors your typing

Chika
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Re: Class action law suit

Actually, methinks this AC has a point as the EULA is liable to run into problems with privacy laws in a number of countries, my own included. Goodness knows that there have been enough security hack cases in places like the UK and Germany (the first ones that spring to mind) and legal shinanigans with various companies including Microsoft that would have made them cautious about this sort of thing. The EULA might have some legal standing but it is not above the law.

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Windows 10 feedback: 'Microsoft, please do a deal with Google to use its browser'

Chika
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Re: It's stupid but...

I wouldn't touch IE with a bargepole if I had a choice. One of the most annoying bits of kit there is, regardless of version 9, 10 or 11. For example, what twat came up with the idea of combining the search bar and the address bar?

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Vanished blog posts? Enterprise gaps? Welcome to Windows 10

Chika
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Re: Windows 7 with a flat theme

"This probably isn't the final theme. I imagine that they'll want it to look at least a little more different from Windows 8 to help distance it from that release. Perhaps there will be a new look ready to show off by the consumer preview in the spring."

I really hope so. My own theory (never been sure how true it was) is that Aero was sacrificed due to its resource footprint and possibly because the people programming the OS couldn't get on with it anyway. While some of that might be false (no doubt), the eventual outcome in my view was something that looked more like Windows 3 than anything else. And I wasn't W3's biggest fan. In fact, an even closer match was RISC OS back when it was 2D only but with some crippling extra bits that never troubled an Acorn user because Acorn were a lot better at handling the nuances of intuitive UI design.

IMHO that's the biggest hurdle that Microsoft face right now, even if the UI remains bug-ugly. They need to restore some of the intuitiveness that prior developers worked to bring to the mess that Windows was in its early days. Windows 7 wasn't perfect but it was a damn sight better than some of its predecessors. The W8 came along and killed it.

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Microsoft's nightmare DEEPENS: Windows 8 market share falling fast

Chika
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Re: Do they really care?

We were evicted from our allotment. We used to have to dig a hole int' middle o't road.

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Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really

Chika
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Happy

Re: It's actually Windows OS X

So you believe that it'll be a bit ruff?

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