* Posts by Chika

959 posts • joined 2 Oct 2007

Page:

Microsoft picks up shotgun, walks 'Modern apps' behind the shed

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Windows RT users – both of you

Hmm... I tried that as well on Windows 12 server for a little while. Then I tried installing Classic Shell on it. Got my sanity back.

0
0

It's FREE WINDOWS 10 time: 29 July is D-Day, yells Microsoft

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Free for Vista Users?

Vista was EOL'd a long time ago, no free upgrade for you my friend

Vista EOL is April 11 2017.

Not that I expect M$ to consider a free upgrade for something that failed that hard though, for your sake at least, I hope I'm wrong.

3
2
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: My Windows Upgrade Benchmark

Will I still need Classic Shell after the Win10 upgrade? That's the only real question I need answered.

It really depends on how you want to use your system. Microsoft have returned most of the function and functionality of the start menu to W10 - they just amalgamated TIFKAM into the second column of the menu that was used in XP, Vista and 7 for all the pinned/recently used applications.

However Classic Shell was used for more than just giving you a start menu...

3
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: @dogged

Bullseye. In all that I've read and heard so far, this is one of the biggest reasons to be cautious about this.

  • How far can we go to maintain our previous installation in case the new one goes pear shaped?
  • If I were to use the licence for a Windows 7 machine but install W10 on a clean drive, could I drop back again if I don't like what I get?
  • What are the overall requirements for rebuilding should a W10 installation from free need rebuilding after the first year is up?
I suspect (and certainly hope) that details like these will come forward before the release. What I don't want is a system that is effectively bricked because W10 didn't go in as planned yet I'm not allowed to drop back to whatever came before.

4
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Loving the free upgrade

Time is money.

Does that mean that time is evil?

Time to take the backup

Which some folk won't bother with because it takes time.

Time to install W10

Time to feed the fish.

Time to find out that it is a POS

Time to clean the tank.

Time to restore the backup

Time to swear like a sailor because you couldn't be bothered to take a backup (see above)

At $150/hour then yes it does become expensive

Is that the going rate these days?!?

0
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Loving the free upgrade

Yeah, but I can imagine the rush to get it at the start. I can afford to wait a little until the initial rush dies down and the opening bug gambit has at least made itself known.

Just remember; every new version of Windows had problems somewhere. Quite often it was driver issues and non-supported hardware, often it was all the problems of inherited code when you tried to upgrade, sometimes it was software incompatibilities, and we don't quite know about some of the new features that might go boobies up in a fully working environment.

Of course there will always be those that insist on having the code on day 1 - these are important people as they do all the suffering through these problems which the rest of us can then pick up on when we finally get around to doing our upgrades.

0
0
Chika
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Re: Windows 10?

Basically, this whole "alternating versions" meme is bullshit.

Not to mention boring. Every time they wheel out a new version, somebody revives it.

4
0

Microsoft's Surface 3 is sweet – but I wouldn't tickle my nads with it

Chika
Bronze badge

Well I can honestly say that I want nothing to do with any laptop or fondleslab that has been used to tickle anyone's nads!

More seriously I still have little use for a Windows Surface at that sort of price. I already have a tablet that does what I need it to do and it cost me considerably less than the asking price here. Until M$ (and Apple in places) can be moved onto something that bit cheaper, I suspect that they will find it difficult to get into the market.

Unless Google (and Apple, possibly) do something really stupid, of course.

0
0

Kiwi company posts job ad for Windows support scammers

Chika
Bronze badge

There's some bloke from India calling about a copyright claim...

1
0

'It's not layoffs, it's operationalising our strategy'

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Operationalising our strategy

There's only one problem with this. It comes in the form of that age old saying - it takes one to know one.

0
0

Microsoft sniffs around Xiaomi Mi 4 smarties with Windows 10

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Mmmm.....Xiaomi !

Aren't Xiaomi those sour tasting sweets from Scandinavia ?

Apparently the word means "Foxtail millet". Doesn't sound particularly sweet to me.

The Chinese need to think a bit more about naming before tackling Western retail markets -- e.g. the Vodaphone drone who strongly recommended the "Hawaii" Ascend.

Depends on the actual model. I used an Ascend G330 for a couple of years with little trouble though I can't ever say that I used Vodaphone at all. As for marketing, even western corporates don't always get it their own way. Anyone remember the N-Gage?

0
0

Dear departed Internet Explorer, how I will miss you ... NOT

Chika
Bronze badge

I'm not totally in agreement that IE11 was any good. IE10 had some points to it but in more than one place I have seen IE11 deployed only to see it have to go back to IE10 as it broke too much, especially when it came to portals and the like.

You could always argue that the blame there lies with the portals and the like but if it works with IE10, IE9, IE8, Firefox, Chrome, Midori, Opera, Safari, Konqueror, NetSurf or whatever, then you need to consider where the line needs to be drawn when apportioning the blame. It always seemed to me that each successive IE release broke something else, then sites had to adapt to allow for it when they finally ran out of patience waiting for Microsoft to fix their blunders. If Microsoft are now saying that the code has become too unwieldy to fix every time they try to integrate a new feature that nobody asked for or change it to allow for a new standard that just came in, I suppose that you can't blame them too much.

Of course there are some abominations out there posing as web sites that will kill a browser on contact or at least confuse the excrement out of it.

3
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: NetSurf

Ooo NetSurf! Mostly forgotten about that when I stopped using my Risc PCs to access the Internet some years ago. Mind you, back then I had no option on the Javascript side of things - they must have added that since then.

I missed out on much of that stuff back then anyway as I tended to use Acorn's Browse (or Phoenix for a little while) or Oregano. It was interesting (and sometimes annoying) to watch how things went on the web as Microsoft and Netscape slugged it out!

2
0

BOFH: Mmm, gotta love me some fresh BYOD dog roll

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Newky

D.O.G.

Dodgy Old Gear.

0
0

DANGER: Is that 'hot babe' on Skype a sextortionist?

Chika
Bronze badge
Paris Hilton

Open mouth, insert plod

Despite a number of international police busts...

Does Ms. Wong work for the fuzz then? Or maybe the lovely Ms. Hilton now works for the filth?

1
0

Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW

Chika
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: We've just rolled out Windows 7

Actually, looking at what W10 (or WX if you prefer) looks like, you'll have a lot less of a problem retraining users for that than W8, so you may be correct in holding your ponies.

But we haven't seen the release candidate yet...

2
0
Chika
Bronze badge
FAIL

Re: People are still using Windows 7?

Bit of an obvious troll, don't you think? You aren't even trying.

3
0
Chika
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Re: 711

Yes please, let's have UI fragmentation just like Linux, that's the way!

And do you know why there is so much UI fragmentation in Linux? Consider GNOME 3, KDE 4 or Unity, for example. The predecessors and many of the successors such as Cinnamon or MATE ended up the way they were for exactly the same reason as why people bitch and moan about Windows 8.x - the people behind the UIs didn't listen and instead went on their merry way without realising that the design used in classics such as KDE 3 ended up that way because people were familiar with them. They did what users wanted them to do. When you look at KDE 3 you may notice a certain similarity with the XP/Vista environment. Heck, I even still use KDE 3 myself, mostly because of the crappy job that the KDE team did with KDE 4 IMHO. GNOME is the same; if it wasn't, Cinnamon and MATE would never have come into existance.

So it is with Linux, so it is with Windows too. Same cause, same effect. Microsoft had Sinovsky, Linux has Poettering. Same shit, different packaging.

17
2

Global PC market's not dead, it's just resting – Gartner

Chika
Bronze badge
Trollface

Actually, it's pining..

I've said it on a number of occasions. It really gets my goat (poor thing hasn't had a moment to itself lately) that so many people insist that the PC is in decline. There's a lot of reasons why people are not buying new PCs right now yet few seem to take any notice. Even this Gartner person isn't considering all angles, or perhaps he is but the reporter isn't interested in reporting them.

Tablet infiltration into the market is only one part of the whole situation. Corporates are being scared off even now because of the whole Windows 8 fiasco, not to mention that some are still rolling out W7 despite today's coming of age of that system (i.e. moving to "extended coverage" which usually means "we'll fix it if we can be bothered or if it is likely to make us look bad"). Generally people are getting a bit sick of changing their hardware every few years because it won't run what they need anymore. It's exactly how it was back when Vista came out and yet Microsoft and the various hardware players still ignore this.

And so, if this report is complete and unabridged, do Gartner.

0
1

What do UK and Iran have in common? Both want to outlaw encrypted apps

Chika
Bronze badge

Hmm... It's 31 years late, but Big Brother Dave is out to get us, it seems. I'll have to go look at this TOR thingy; that's supposed to have been designed for accessing the internet from oppressive regimes, isn't it? ;)

4
0

Microsoft: How to run Internet Explorer 11 on ANDROID, iOS, OS X

Chika
Bronze badge

So, if I use it to go to a web site that's infected by a zero-day vulnerability, whose machine get's hacked? Mine? Microsoft's? Both?

This is a beta product (yes, I know that Muckysoft don't like the word "Beta" but stuff it, call a spade a spade). You never really know until it happens.

0
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: missing the point

The chance to surf wherever you want no matter what local rights you have on your PC, no matter your skill level and no chance to get hit by a drive-by. I've been thinking about doing this for our users - creating an airgap for the browser. Malware immediately becomes less dangerous.

Firstly, I can surf where I want, when I want, and I don't need a cloud based browser to do it.

Secondly, given that I saw a story about Azure outages on the same page as the link to this article... well, you get the idea.

As for the idea that malware becomes less dangerous, I suspect that this would be a short term condition, if indeed it is true.

0
0

HTC Desire Eye: The Android superior selfie shooter

Chika
Bronze badge
Coat

You are without Honor

I've now been using my Huawei Honor 6 for about a week and I'm pretty impressed with it. I'd suggest that despite only being available online and have a very slightly smaller screen, it really outdoes this HTC. And it's cheaper. Methinks that the Chinese are slowly tying this market up.

How about it?

0
0

Hawking and friends: Artificial Intelligence 'must do what we want it to do'

Chika
Bronze badge
Coat

AI isn't the problem

The thing that worries me isn't that AI will obtain conciousness and take over the world. It's that an unscrupulous corporate will insert its agenda into the machine and take over the world by proxy. Anyone remember the original Robocop? Think that it couldn't happen?

This agreement hasn't solved the real problem, IMHO.

0
0

It's 4K-ing big right now, but it's NOT going to save TV

Chika
Bronze badge

4k is the new 3D

Let's face it, folk. This all smacks of the same sort of thing that was around a few years ago when all + dog insisted that we all need to go 3D. OK, it's not quite as bad since none of us will need a stupid pair of glasses to watch the thing but we still have the problem that most of the television programmes that were any good were originally made for 625 lines and even the more recent stuff won't look any better on 4k than it did on 480p unless you have an extensive Blu-ray collection. And that always supposes that the stuff you are watching is going to make 4k worth the effort.

To be honest, the market that is more likely to take to 4k will be the computer market where 4k is already beginning to make a small mark, though even there the games out there that will work at 4k aren't that thick on the ground yet and little else actually requires that much depth of resolution. It's going to be a few years before it really catches on and the various sales types will no doubt be itching for the next new thing to sell sets long before that.

2
1

Broadband isn't broadband unless it's 25Mbps, mulls FCC boss

Chika
Bronze badge
Trollface

Re: 11? But for what percent their customers

Hmm... It has been a while since I last watch "This Is Spinal Tap"! :)

As for what does and doesn't constitute "broadband", given that the term was half-inched anyway, who actually gives a toss?

0
0

Microsoft patch batch pre-alerts now for paying customers ONLY

Chika
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: foot shooting

Yeah, MS-DOS in that era was a bit of a pig. Especially if you only had one floppy drive. Disc swapping was something of an art form back then.

1
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: foot shooting

But no one will ever need more than 640k anyway :-)

Oh yes! I remember that one! Brought to you by the same person that, allegedly, when presented with an example of an Econet network in the dim and distant past, asked the school student that presented it; "What's a network?"

That's our Billy!

0
0

Huawei? Apple and Samsung's worst nightmare, pal

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Whose worst nightmare? Samsung's! Not Apple's.

Well, what about Apple - inventor of stuff that people actually want.

What about them? Actually, no, let's consider that Apple, despite having invented a few things over the years, aren't that much better than a number of other American corporates who invent a few things then spend the rest of their days sitting on their IP, filing countless lawsuits to back themselves up. While other corporates like Samsung and Google can stand up to this sort of thing and will give as good as they get, the people that suffer are the small fry who often do the real inventing work.

As for phone sales and such, I took delivery of my Huawei Honor 6 this week. I've been a Huawei user for a couple of years now and though I often get odd looks when I tell people what I use, they are often impressed by the phone and, more notably, the price I paid to get it. I look at the cost of Apple and Samsung devices and realised long ago that paying that sort of money just for a badge cannot be justified unless they have a must-have functionality that is worth that extra cost. If not, I'm quite happy to let Huawei, Xioumi, Oneplus, ZTE or whoever tout for my business. They have proven themselves to me.

0
0

Not app-y with VAT: Apple bumps up prices in Blighty, Europe, Canada

Chika
Bronze badge
Trollface

Apple traditionally claims this is down to the higher cost of doing business overseas.

Which is why Apple, like so many other Merkan corporates, charge £1 to $1 in so many places, at the very least. Bah...

1
0

Eight pocket-pleasing USB 3.0 hard drives

Chika
Bronze badge

WD My Shovelware

I own one WD My Passport which works OK. It comes, however, with shovelware installed, something I'd prefer to do without so my advice here would be to avoid My Passport and go for the Elements range instead. I tend to avoid the Seagate units as the last one I bought was Linux unfriendly, something I haven't suffered with any of my other externals.

Having said that, I've also got an Adata or two knocking about and I have no quibbles about those, though the one Freecom "gimpdrive" I ever owned had a flimsy USB socket which broke away from its mounting (it mounted directly onto the board inside the unit) which wasn't impressive IMHO.

0
0

X marks the chop: Microsoft takes axe to Nokia's Android venture

Chika
Bronze badge
Trollface

Re: They had to do it

But there's a problem with this sort of joke. It's difficult to get it unless you are aware of the context. That's why emoticons were invented, for example. :b

0
0

1,000mph ROCKET CAR project dogged by beancounters

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: The love of money is the root of all evil

Yes to all that. Shit workers, cars, management, the lot.

Pay peanuts, after all...

4
0

What you need to know about keeping your cloud data safe

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Warm feelings

Would I want a "random cloud person" to do anything at all to my data? The whole article smacks of an apologists' view, especially if the security in question is being supplied by the same people that provide the cloud. We come back to the basic question of trust, one that is applicable as much to the cloud provider as to the absconding sysadmin you talk of. Since the whole NSA business came up, my view of cloud storage and computing has declined drastically, and that's before we even consider my starting position.

Make no mistake, I know that the companies may well be as trustworthy as you like but, at the end of the day, you only have their word for it.

0
0

Solar-powered bra maker suffers 20,000 TITSUPs all at once

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: I bet Triumph Lingerie feels sheepish....

Quite so. In fact, I'd suspect that somebody is feeling a right tit just about now.

1
0

YEAR of the PENGUIN: A Linux mobile in 2015?

Chika
Bronze badge
Flame

systemd of a down

OK, so things have been looking up for Linux this year, but the last couple of years have also seen a number of things that have been incredibly annoying. One of those things appeared in a few places in this review; "The Desktop Is Dead!"

It's been in more than one story this year and the last, partly surrounding the advent of the Window system and partly because of the doings of some Linux distros, not to mention Android. "The desktop is dead, the desktop is dead, the desktop is dead..." yet in another report, I mentioned that the possible reason is that users are hanging on to their desktop (and laptop) machines longer than the market likes, driving down the figures when they do. Could it simply be that certain folk behind the scenes who have a vested interest either in driving the desktop system into the ground to allow for a rise in feelables, or the same sort of person who wants to panic the market into grabbing new hardware before it disappears, are simply pressuring the media (any media, not just El Reg) into a whispering campaign? I've said it here before - repeat something often enough and people will start to believe it.

It wasn't so long that a report here on this very organ stated that tablet sales had levelled out and that the desktop had started to rise again. Make up your minds! Or has Regina's eggsplosion distracted you?

And that's before I even get to Poettering and his systemd crap. But that has been discussed at length elsewhere.

2
0

UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: So fork, then

How many years did it take good coders to fix that clusterfuck?

You mean they fixed it?!? I normally switch it off for the sake of my own sanity at least.

0
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: So fork, then

I agree with that, mostly because I fell into the same trap years ago with openSUSE 12.2 (12.1 was a waste of time as systemd was so buggy on that version and replacing it with sysvinit was the only solution). Since then systemd has crept like a huge slug-like creature into so many parts of the system including a mid-release change in oS 12.3 which killed a number of applications without notice. To this day I still keep 11.4, the last version of openSUSE not to have systemd in it and a bloody good version IMHO going in various places and may well do so beyond the death of its Evergreen support demise seven months hence rather than Poettering about with the broken dross I see more recently.

1
0

Linux systemd dev says open source is 'SICK', kernel community 'awful'

Chika
Bronze badge
Flame

Re: What's to say they can't BOTH be right?

To put it bluntly, Poettering needs to be sure of his ground first before he criticises either LT or the community in general.

Having been on the end of a sizeable amount of work to resolve problems with more than one piece of software broken by the imposition and obfuscation of systemd (not to mention other problems with other Poettering outpourings), I've been less offended by the foul mouth of LT and others. As things continue, Linux is slowly turning into systemd rather than systemd is providing a service to Linux.

Of course Poettering can only shoulder so much of the blame - the various distros that use his work made a decision to do that. The people behind these distros are as much to blame here.

0
0

BOFH: Santa, bloody Santa

Chika
Bronze badge
Happy

Thank you

I have had a really shitty week so far this week. I needed this...

0
0

BOFH: Capo di tutti capi, bah. I'm having CHICKEN JALFREZI

Chika
Bronze badge

I see the plunder seeds have sprouted, then...

Actually, my sympathies here are for the Boss. Who would want to be in the crossfire of that battle?

Or possibly the ultimate aim would be to kick the HR bods that pretty much started this whole thing. Fascinating!

1
0

Happy 2nd birthday, Windows 8 and Surface: Anatomy of a disaster

Chika
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Apology accepted?

To be honest, this article sounds like an apologists' reasoning for all that happened with Windows 8. Yes, there were improvements under the bonnet but this ignores the fact that the main reason why people objected to its use was the wholesale change of the front end and the blanket refusal by Microsoft to provide any half way solution despite the fact that such a solution existed early in the development lifecycle. We heard the company chants of "cloud first, mobile first" and knew that all was not well. Sinofsky and Co. deserve credit? No freaking way!

This was just yet another example of Microsoft playing it safe when the legwork was being done by others, in this case by Apple and Google and their contractors, then attempting to swan into the market to try to cream it off. In that respect S&C don't necessarily deserve all the blame, but they can't avoid some of it.

0
0

Ten Linux freeware apps to feed your penguin

Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Linux?

.deb != Ubuntu

I wondered how long it would be before that came up. Yet again it appears that an article written for El Reg has forgotten that Linux is not one source or distro but all of them hence, as was rightly suggested, Linux is NOT Ubuntu. Having said that, however, .deb, just like .rpm, is a packaging system. The code must be out there somewhere and if it is freeware or gnuware, a plain old tarball probably exists. Or...

I just had a peek... http://github.com/byhestia/springseed. Don't know if it would work on my openSUSE boxes but it might be worth a try.

2
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: LibreOffice

I normally find that the malformed XML comes from trying to open the ODF file itself rather than opening a docx file converted from an ODF, though YMMV. There is a plug in for Office that allows it to open ODFs directly which has been known to save my bacon occasionally.

0
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Nice article

I can thoroughly recommend SMPlayer. I have been using this on various openSUSE machines since oS 11.1 and it has developed out of all recognition. I just wish it was as stable on Windows boxes as I'd standardise on it like a shot (for now it's CCCP and/or VLC for Windows, no contest).

1
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: I'm a big fan of WPS Office

LibreOffice is not stable enough for business. Use OpenOffice instead.

I'd say quite the opposite, really. OOo was good up until the big split but one of the biggest problems I get with it now is that what it produces doesn't sit well with MS Office users. LibreOffice doesn't seem to have that sort of trouble and has been rock solid on many of my systems, Linux and Windows alike.

Any substitute for Visio ? Wanna sketch out my network.

Not sure. There are libraries that can be used to parse Visio formats but I've not really looked into what can be used as a front end for them. The closest I ever got were with graphical front ends for nmap or the mapping tool in Nagios. Not really sketch tools though. You could always consider LibreOffice Draw if you don't mind doing all the template sketches yourself.

5
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Amarok as good iTunes replacement?

Just recently I have been using Clementine which seems to keep much of what was good from Amarok in the KDE3 days.

6
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Please don't feed the troll.

But the poor thing seems so hungry!

4
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: GIMP

Sadly that can be said for a lot of stuff these days. You could even say that GIMP has been gimped. Why is it that developers don't have the balls to actually say how bad systemd actually is? Or is it that they have been sucked in by the hype? We need an LT rant here, STAT!!!

5
0
Chika
Bronze badge

Re: Hmm. Geany could be worth a look...

I liked !Zap but I eventually moved to !StrongED for some reason. As I recall, much of my text editing was HTML and I preferred the way !StrongED worked though I eventually shifted to Quanta Plus on Linux, usually running on KDE3. For much of my ordinary text stuff, I use KWrite, though I do have Kate installed and have dabbled on occasion.

0
0

Page:

Forums