* Posts by Bob H

563 posts • joined 20 Sep 2007

Page:

Boffins map Netflix's Open Connect CDN

Bob H
Bronze badge

They moved their processing, not their Open Connect delivery network.

0
0

Netflix picks fight with internet exchange industry

Bob H
Bronze badge

It seems a strange argument from Netflix, the majority of their traffic doesn't even pass through the IXPs. Any ISP who has a decent number of Netflix users will be using a Netflix CDN appliance inside their network. You might argue that this is necessary because of the limitations of the IXP system, but in reality for any larger ISP most of their traffic is through private peering to Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Netflix and the various CDN providers. Public internet exchanges are just there for the sizeable minority of more unusual routes.

https://openconnect.itp.netflix.com/deliveryOptions/

2
0

Meet the 1,000 core chip that can be powered by an AA battery

Bob H
Bronze badge

Reminds me of the Epiphany-IV 64-core Microprocessor by Adapteva, sure it has less cores but the architecture seems similar. The problem with the Adapteva and I imagine a similar problem for this 1000 core design, the on-core memory is tiny and so it is difficult to fit useful workloads in to them. So you spend loads of time on an external CPU with a bigger core scheduling the tasks to the tiny cores. The architecture is really hard to programme for.

http://www.adapteva.com/products/e64g401/

0
0

Who shot JR (that great Dallas broadband)?

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Get the facts!

I think one of the questions with Google is: what do they do at the edges? How do they decide when to stop laying fibre? Most importantly: who gets left behind?

0
0

Our CompSci exam was full of 'typos', admits Scottish exam board

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: By design?

@Tom 7

Indeed, twice been down the road of hearing from a tame person on the other side that it's a stitch up and we have no chance. Once my MD put in a bid below cost just to ensure that it caused problems for someone down the line.

0
0

O2 chief techie: Light up dark fibre and unleash the small cell army

Bob H
Bronze badge

Spare wavelengths.

It's not just about dark fibre, there is lots of under-utilised fibre which could be exploited. I worked for one company where we found that we had just a 2Mb E1 going to one site and we wondered what else we could use it for.

Lets look at what other wavelengths could be better utilised around the country and put them on the market.

2
0

England just not windy enough for wind farms, admits renewables boss

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Nuclear

We also need to explore more innovation in nuclear instead of relying on designs from the era of the atomic bomb. I like the Thorium designs and I don't think they've been given nearly enough investment. The Indians and Chinese are starting to invest in Thorium reactors and I think it would be really good if we didn't get left behind.

21
0

African IP address body exec half-apologizes for 'Whites are taking over' race-row email

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Email privacy

Busted... so make a quick half-apology.

2
0

You don't need no STEEENKING GPU, says Intel

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Or no doubt..

At $450 this chip costs as much as a decent GPU and I haven't seen a GPU that can do 15 HD AVC transcodes yet. Certainly there is nothing from the GPU market that can do this at such a low TDP.

0
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Bloody 'Ell

This chip really suits IPTV providers, streaming companies and broadcasters. Previously you bought an appliance that cost tens of thousands of pounds to do transcodes using ASIC chips, they provided excellent quality but the cost hurt. Many encoder and transcoder companies have been moving to software and cloud solutions in recent years which has hit the video ASIC market. With chips like this providing over a dozen transcodes in a 45W TDP for $450 I can see it being very attractive in my line of work.

The VDI business is interesting, but look beyond that to the encoding space and there will be people jumping on this chipset when it hits the street.

0
0

Google-backed solar electricity facility sets itself on fire

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Predicting Problems

It was a misalignment, so some of the mirrors that reflect light were off-point and no one noticed until it was too late.

0
0

Inside Project Loon – Google's megaplan to build a global internet

Bob H
Bronze badge

Sorry Google, Facebook has it right with Aquila. Your balloons are just hot air.

0
0

Smartmobes in spaaace: NASA deploys Android nanosats

Bob H
Bronze badge

I always wonder why Android needs to go in to devices like this? What value does it add compared to Debian or something similar?

The mantra of "Android all the things" seems wrong to me.

0
0

El Reg Quid-A-Day Nosh Posse spared chickpea ordeal

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Sorry to hear the project is on hold

@Lester,

In the article it wasn't particularly clear as to why you had suspended operations, perhaps you could look at the text to make that clearer?

1
0

ExoMars works! 2 Mbit/s link established and camera snapping

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Astounding !

@Mage

There are a variety of different DSL bandwidths/profiles depending on the customer need. There is however a 2Mbps/2Mbps profile which is called SDSL (and there is also SHDSL).

Also ADSL2+ Annex M allows for uplinks up to 3.3Mbit/sec, <sarcasm>but what would someone want with that much bandwidth is beyond me.</sarcasm>

0
0

South Korea to upgrade national stereo defence system for US$16m

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: What is the point of this?

2.6% of defectors were apparently in military service at the time of their departure from the North.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Korean_defectors#South_Korea

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-southkorea-northkorea-defector-idUSKBN0OV04W20150615

http://edition.cnn.com/2012/10/06/world/asia/north-korea-defector/

0
0

Your broadband speeds are up by 6Mbps, boasts UK watchdog Ofcom

Bob H
Bronze badge

Further proof that measuring success by "average" numbers isn't relevant, it is all about the distribution.

0
0

Bristol boffins blast 1.59 Gbps down ONE 20 MHz channel

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: “5G breakthrough”

There is plenty of spectrum, it just needs operators to use it better. They need to invest more in femtocells and other small cell architectures to off-load capacity at a local level.

In my view 5G is technology m*sturbation, operators need to work harder with what they have.

0
0

Ofcom wants to crack down on pisspoor BT Openreach biz lines

Bob H
Bronze badge

Until BT has competition they don't really try.

3
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: The whole thing is a crock of s**t for everyone

OpenReach doesn't have a KPI which includes reliability at any sort of fine level. As long as the bit of copper works when someone from OpenReach tests it then Schrödinger's cable is alive. We need OpenReach to be accountable for uptime as well.

3
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

I believe I've seen BT deliberately not upgrading cabinets to FTTC because they are primarily business customers and they know they'll loose BTNet fibre business. That is one of the bigger crimes here.

7
0

Swede builds steam-powered Raspberry Pi. Nowhere to plug in micro-USB, then?

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Loop much?

A sterling engine?

1
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Voltage Drop

Bigger capacitor?

2
0

Dropbox slips 500PB into its Magic Pocket, not spread over AWS

Bob H
Bronze badge

I believe it relates to how much data is "lost" through bit-rot or other data loss factors, rather than just being unavailable.

0
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: In house

I read a posting by some company who had some hosted hardware in NY, I can't remember who it was but I think I found it through El Reg though.

Interestingly their argument was that if you could justify the headcount to manage hardware and you had predictable capacity then outsourcing your servers doesn't necessarily make sense. Every argument I have seen about going cloud either boils down to two things: scaling/flexibility and/or administration overhead. Whenever I hear the administration overhead argument it is put forward by software people because, understandably, software people don't want to care about hardware.

But simply put, the costs of hardware and hosting can be cheaper than the cloud if you have the right economies of scale. But people should be doing more diligence than just saying "put it all in the cloud!" because they might not be doing the best for their business.

0
0

Google cloud wobbles as workers patch wrong routers

Bob H
Bronze badge

'Disaster recovery' is an over used phrase, in my view DR is like insurance: it shouldn't be needed but you have it just in case. If your day-to-day processes need DR then you are doing it wrong. You should have good processes with appropriate monitoring and roll-back, in this case they didn't seem to have that.

2
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: it took them 45 minutes...

I remember when things went off-air at a previous job it was standard procedure to yell "Nigel!!!!" in to the racks. It was probably him who had broken something.

2
0

Institute of Directors: Make broadband speeds 1000x faster than today's puny 2020 target

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Gigabit broadband please!

Multiple 4k programmes? How many 65in TVs do you have anyway?

2
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: London ... poor ranking compared to other capital cities."

The hydraulic pipes are already full of fibre, but the core route doesn't cover as much of London as people expect because it really focused on key buildings.

0
0

Hands on with Xiaomi's Mi 5: Great smartphone, but when do we get it?

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Great smartphone agreed but

I loved the irony of talking about the 'okay' camera just below a terrible shot of the phone.

0
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: That looks a lot like a Samsung phone...

Yes, I love the price vs spec (dual SIM in particular) but the fact that it looks like a Samsung clone makes me more reticent.

0
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Dual SIM

Take a look at the Lenovo K3 Note which is about £150 from DX.com.

0
0

Norks stabilise non-threatening space speck ... for about five minutes

Bob H
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: '... for about five minutes'

Reminds me of that misunderstanding in a bar in Koln...

0
0
Bob H
Bronze badge
Gimp

Dirty bomb

Perhaps it's a dirty bomb.... a dirty, dirty, filthy, dirty, naughty, oh... my....

11
0

Uh-oh, no mo' dough to 'slow-mo' GoGo: American Airlines aims ammo at Wi-Fi pros

Bob H
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: Shooting itself would be an even bigger improvement

And the Mrs Grace L. Ferguson Airline and Storm Door Company

...waits for the first person to get that reference

0
0

Silent Nork satellite tumbling in orbit

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: No telemetry

I am confused by the qualification that it is silent, how are people so sure that it isn't transmitting anything? Is it just because it isn't transmitting on Ku-Band, C-Band, L-Band or UHF? Have people checked the entire EM spectrum and found nothing? I would expect the NSA/GCHQ to have done that but it isn't easy if they aren't using standard mechanisms. It could even be using some exotic UWB communications are are very hard to spot and are easily mistaken for noise.

4
7

Dell PowerEdge R730: Reg rack monkeys crack smiles over kindness of engineers

Bob H
Bronze badge

Redundancy

Argh!

Redundant: adjective - not or no longer needed or useful; superfluous.

The power supplies aren't redundant, they are resilient, if they were redundant you wouldn't need them but I am fairly certain it doesn't have its own generator inside.

Can people please stop referring to things as being redundant when they mean resilient?

2
34

Remember Netbooks? Windows 10 makes them good again!

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: The facts!

My Samsung NC10 didn't perform particularly well with Ubuntu but I think Unity was to blame, I really need to find that machine and rebuild it with Mint.

3
0

Submarine cable cut lops Terabits off Australia's data bridge

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Microwave?

Actually you can do tropo-scatter but it is really hard, really noisy and doesn't give nearly the capacity of LoS microwave.

0
0

Lights out for Space Vehicle Number 23: UK smacked when US sat threw GPS out of whack

Bob H
Bronze badge

Good ol' MSF?

Has anyone compared the 1pps of GPS to the frequency reference of MSF? As far as I am aware the MSF signal is very, very accurate (10^12) and so it should make a good reference for the UK.

0
0

El Reg nips down to the Hewlett You Inn?

Bob H
Bronze badge

Recently I received a handful of SD cards, delivered in a tray that would hold 48 SD cards, in an antistatic bag, wrapped in bubble wrap, in a box, inside another box packed with foam.

Those blank SD cards were, at no point, at risk.

This was not HP and I actually received two sets in two separate and identically packed shipments.

2
0

Reg readers battle to claim 'my silicon's older than yours' crown

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Nuclear Power Station...

A foreign sounding voice at the end of the line, "we would like to come and study your computer-ma-bob"

0
0

BT scoops £100m network provision deal from the BBC

Bob H
Bronze badge

C&W

The contract used to be what was a facility that C&W set up as part of the Siemens outsourcing deal after BBC Technology was sold to Siemens. The national fibre network was part of the contract to connect every BBC location and largely about moving uncompressed video about. The London connectivity was a separate contract where huge quantities of dark fibre were on long-term lease and that preceded outsourcing.

BT has always provided video connectivity to broadcasters, they host the main neutral video switch at BT Tower that just about everyone uses. To conflate this as being an IT outsourcing contract is to confuse video with IT and the provision is very different.

4
0

'Blue light services will get 4G on London Tube!' Cool, how? 'Errrrm...'

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: What's wrong with TETRA?

But the TETRA equipment costs a fortune, they could use more COTS parts with LTE (if done correctly).

That saying I would suggest that in the interim, until LTE is ready, it would be easy to build a TETRA accessory module which has a emergency beacon button and links to the officers phone by Bluetooth or USB? That way you could use the LTE network for day-to-day operations but keep TETRA for emergencies and when LTE is unavailable.

0
0
Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: "Who's traffic gets priority?"

If this is EE, will they offer callers priority access if they pay an additional 50p?

0
0

Folk shun UK.gov's 'expensive' subsidised satellite broadband

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Satellite Broadband? @Mage

One of the problems with mobile coverage is that most of the the masts aren't owned by the operators, they are owned by Arqiva. If the government paid Arqiva to roll out more masts instead of putting pots into satellite broadband then the rural community might get somewhere. But the other challenge is: do the rural communities want more masts on their hills?

In late 2014 I was staying at the Snake Pass Inn in the Peak District and they were constrained to satellite broadband. I don't imagine many locals wanting the Peak District dotted with masts.

Fibre is great, but it is really expensive to dig roads and rural communities are more spread out, thus connectivity is more expensive. The government has tried to subsidise it but those plans weren't very successful. I believe enabling communities to manage their own solutions, which meet their particular local needs, with government support and subsidy, is the best approach. Enable local communities to petition Arqiva and enable small FTTC cooperatives.

Finally, OpenReach, they are over burdened and as a virtual monopoly there doesn't seem to be an adequate solution that doesn't involve restructuring the market.

2
0

Late night server rebuild led to 'nightmares about mutilated corpses'

Bob H
Bronze badge

Self-inflicted injury, no sympathy.

I actually started my career in the control room of a large satellite communications operator, there you get to see horrific and pornographic things on a regular basis.

9
0

Seagate floats out 10TB HDD filled with lifting gas

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Typo in cache size...

If that was an SMR drive then you might want that!

0
0

Fingers crossed tomorrow morning for Telecity's third repair shot

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: Impressive...

I wonder what colour temperature said carbonised human is currently at....

0
0

Broadband's frequency hunters denied Freeview patch – for now

Bob H
Bronze badge

Re: HEVC

Actually BT and TalkTalk both use Multicast for the delivery of YouView channels. But it isn't without complexities and getting the networks to do it with stability is a right b*tch. It is easy to say that all switches support multicast but experience says they get a bit delicate even in lab conditions when you throw a lot of traffic their way, also the equipment at the exchanges needs careful profiling and too many joins sometimes can break things if you aren't careful.

Then the channels want to charge the ISPs for the right to deliver channels instead of seeing the advantage of a distribution medium paid for by someone else. Then the channels also want encyption/DRM which I am sure many here would object to, even if the same channel were originally available free-to-air they still want DRM. Go figure.

Summary: multicast does work, it is in production, but it is more complex at very large scale (hundreds of thousands to millions of users) and channels want to charge ISPs for it.

0
0

Page:

Forums