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back to article Kids as young as FIVE need lessons in online safety - NSPCC

Kids as young as five should be taught how to stay safe online, with tips and advice coming from their mates as well as teachers, a UK children's charity has said. The NSPCC said that online abuse was one of the major child protection issues today, as kids see more and more porn and are encouraged or coerced to make their own …

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Re: Oh dear

Draytek Vigor routers have parental controls built in for web filtering but I believe it is a paid for service which is why I have not tried it out on my router. Damn good router but expensive when compared against that free TalkTalk shite.

The problem is, how many parents who are not working in IT know how to configure their router.

When building laptops for parents, I install K9webprotection from Bluecoat. It's free for home use and works brilliantly for stopping kids access areas of the internet. You only need 15 minutes to show the parents how to login and adjust the settings.

www.k9webprotection.com

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Oh dear

Routers with a form of built in Filtering exist, but as most people want broadband for 50p a month with a free router thrown in don't expect to find it on any of the cheapo models that seem to be the most used.

My Fritz 7390 has both black and white-list facilities. which can be assigned to any/all individual machines on the network, but as ever with many lazy parents that is too much effort - they just want it done for them. If only breeding had been too much effort for them as well!

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Facepalm

Re: Oh dear

But its all rendered spectacularly pointless by a browser in privacy mode using an https google image search :-(

It'll even get through your work firewalls without being detectable or leaving a footprint.

And it's even better now you can get proper big sized images up :-)

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Trollface

Re: Oh dear

Get the Fritzl 7390 router and prevent your daughter from having any contact with the outside world.

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Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Oh dear

MITM certificate, but maybe for home use that's using a sledgehammer to crack a nut.

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Silver badge

Re: Oh dear

Blame Intel

They should be responsible for filtering out the porn - its their CPU that is in charge

And since they have the deepest pockets - they are the ones to sue

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Re: Oh dear

I'm going to burn in the fiery depths of Hell for that, aren't I...

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Anonymous Coward

Parents need to take responsibility, teach kids how to be safe online..

Its parents who would punish a child that are the problem, if a child thinks they will be punished for whatever they are being blackmailed with, then they will listen to the blackmailer, but if they trust their parents to be fair, and know they can talk about anything with their parents, it is no longer an issue...

Online or offline, if a child can trust their parents, they are safer...

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Anonymous Coward

NSPCC drumming up business using FUD - nothing to see here.

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Unhappy

Their fight to turn every human into either a victim or perpetrator of sexual abuse goes on...

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Coat

Lucky

I wish I'd been given lessons in how to find porn when I was in school.

I had to figure out all the good keywords myself :P

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Boffin

"ChildLine is sending workers to every primary school in Britain...

"...to talk about the issues affecting each age group"

I hope the parents are going to be there, because *THEY* are the ones who are responsible for their childrens' safety. Not the schools, not the ISPs, not the Government, not you or me, but *THE PARENTS*!!

Still, there's one possible good outcome of this, perhaps when this generation of kids grows up and some of them go into Government, we'll start getting rid of some of the ludicrous laws that have been introduced by the "We don't like this, so you aren't allowed to see it" brigade...

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Re: "ChildLine is sending workers to every primary school in Britain...

Yes to the first idea, I think that if ChildLine is going to be going into schools they should have two classes, one for the kids and then one for the parents. Educate everyone rather than enforce everyone. For some parents they have had no IT training past your basic Office functions for work or what they have picked up themselves, so generally have no idea about how to set up any kind of filtering. To be fair a lot of parents also use the computer as an electronic child monitor, if the kid is on the computer he is not annoying me is a great response.

However I think you are suffering from an excessive amount of hope if you think this generation of kids will grop up, go into government and change things. I think we are more likely to have another generation that just expects handouts from that government. If we can start bringing the education back to school, and the parenting back to the parents then maybe the next generation or the one after that may have the moral fortitude required to get off of their collective arses and change things for the better.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "ChildLine is sending workers to every primary school in Britain...

"I think we are more likely to have another generation that just expects handouts from that government."

Well, people will treat their kids like little prince/princesses and not teach them responsibiliy/accountability/vaue.

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Anonymous Coward

Kids don't need much training

The parents need a serious education. If your child can see porn from your home network, how is that any different to letting them watch a grumble flick on a DVD?

Both are failures of the parents to exercise their duty. Fixing this does not require draconian legislation that affects us all - it requires parents to get their fingers out and start giving a damn.

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Strange.

I find it strange that they expect tips from other 5 year olds on what not to do and what to do safely online. Those 5 year olds with a rounded experience of life @5 are in for major dissapointments in life as they grow up.

Most boys discover porn, in the old days your dads stash of mags, these days I guess clothing manufacturers commercials........

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Anonymous Coward

All the protections kids need to keep them away from adult content already exist.

It’s the PARENTS that need educating, not just the child.

As for the NSPCC saying "It also called for internet service providers to "stick to their commitment" to give parents clear and easy blocks and filters for the net at home"

Maybe if parents "stuck to their commitment" to raise their child, and not use every excuse in the book to pass that responsibility to others, the issue would not be so prevalent.

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FAIL

Apparently, thanks to the Internet use of contraception is no longer enough to stop me having to raise kids. Everything from busy roads, to newsagent top shelves, to the bleach aisle in the supermarket is dangerous to leave kids unsupervised - so parents are expected to do their job of stopping kids having unsupervised access. The minute they get online, though, suddenly it's everybody else's problem: we all have to put our own resources into keeping feral brats away from anything not child-safe.

If I left a 5 year old kid unattended in the park to chat to every passing stranger, it wouldn't be the strangers or the park getting investigated - and rightly so. Why is it suddenly different with a virtual park and strangers from all over the planet not just the local area?!

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Love the analogy, if people stop thinking about the internet as a massive library where all the information that they could ever want (and a fair bit they dont want!) and used your analogy of a massive park full of strangers, they may think twice about leaving their children unsupervised on the internet.

But as people (inc me) keep saying if parents took responsibility for raising their own children and not expect someone else to do it for them, then this wouldnt be a problem.

Children have to be trusted to fuck up, but when they do fuck up they have to be able to trust their parents enough to talk to them and not fly off the handle Daily Mail style. If they cant talk to you for whatever reason then they are less likely to tell you when something goes wrong and you will only find out when it is to late to stop it from getting worse.

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Bronze badge
Headmaster

Smartphones

With all this talk of blocking routers, we forget that other great tool of stupidity the smartphone. The department blocks youtube, fb, twater etc for students at the poxy server, so when little Mary is facebook feuding with little Sally, they do by phone, ditto when little Johnny wants to watch something on youtube.

It should be legal to block mobile phone signals at school - it would make life so much easier for teachers

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Re: Smartphones

Believe it or not there are smartphone parental control apps.

Furthermore, what fuckwit of a parent:

a) gives a 5 year old a smartphone?

b) gives any child a smartphone and lets them use GSM data?

I mean.. are these kids on unlimited data plans or what?

Surely 90% of smartphone data goes through Wi-Fi anyway?

Which I suppose raises the question, should free wi-fis have restricted access? I can imagine some might find it frustrating if they could no longer get porn on hotel wi-fi but what about Mc Donalds? Who watches porn in Mc Donalds? Should anyone be allowed to watch porn in Mc Donalds? Probably not. If the PFY in the drive through is going to jack off into my burger I'd rather not make it any easier for him.

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Devil

Right class, todays lesson is about online safety. When you get older and attend university you must not, i repeat must not compromise the campus servers and steal free information else bad things will happen to you...

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Anonymous Coward

Never give money to the NSPCC again

I'm guessing tackling child abuse where it's known, by people the child knows is just too damn hard for them.

Fucking disgraceful.

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Silver badge
Childcatcher

Ok, so which civil liberty are we about to lose now?

Every time I see the media and children's organisations starting up about the need to protect children, my automatic assumption is that the freedom-destruction wheel is about to click over another ratchet.

So what's it to be this time? Is there a particular porn site that's been getting up some do-gooder's nose that needs to be added to the IWF blocklist? Or perhaps the police need a new invasive power that the public would oppose so some "think of the children" juice needs to be whipped up?

It is a sad indictment of modern society that such a noble goal as ensuring the safety of children has been so often abused and hijacked by powermongers with an agenda, that it has become a stereotype of assuming that more of our freedoms are to be taken away, rather than believing that someone somewhere is actually concerned about the well-being of kids with no other agenda behind the curtain.

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Thumb Up

Free sex-ed...

Look at it this way: porn is just "training tapes", and these "kids" are learning the essential basics that neither parents nor schools are teaching. And there's plenty of material for "advanced studies".

I think if I found my kid with a stock of porn, I'd make sure s/he secured it properly (to keep me out of trouble), and then make damned sure s/he felt comfortable enough to approach me and ask me questions, that I would answer honestly.

And I'd buy s/he a nice box of condoms.

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