Feeds

back to article Latest exoplanet discovery is a virtual CLONE of Earth

Astroboffins poring through data from NASA's Kepler telescope have spotted what they think might be the most Earth-like planet yet discovered. The object has a radius 1.5 times that of Earth, which lumps it into the class of extrasolar planets known as "super Earths." That's not so unusual, in and of itself; scientists estimate …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

so when is the elysium leaving for tanis, and where do i sign up? :)

1
0

well the first thing is to point a radio telescope at it, surely?

2
0

depending on the distance it might fall within astroarcheology (which radioastronomy is a subset of)

(listening to stuff that happened "distance" years ago)

we don't have the tech to listen/communicate instantly yet (it will be probably something based on quantum entanglement)

0
0
Silver badge
Meh

Depends...

...upon how far away it is. If it's say 1,000 light years away, then all we would hear is any radio noise emitted from where it was 1,000 years ago. We would only see its star as it was - and where it was - 1,000 years ago.

We would have to study it for some time and - if possible, calculate where it is now and point a radio telescope all along the track from its observed position (where it was 1,000 years ago) to where it is calculated to be and hope that in the intervening time any inhabitants had developed the technology to send radio signals in a recognisable way, and they would still be 1,000 years advanced from when they transmitted. Any reply would give an effective response time of 2,000 years between transmit & receive response assuming we pointed our response in the right direction.

Of course, if it's a near neighbour, say 20 - 30 light years away, then the signal/response time might be only 40 - 60 years...

0
2
Headmaster

Re: Depends...

You do know that radio wave propagate at the speed of light don't you??? Da

So light and radio will be 1000 years old when it get here. the true present position id immaterial

0
0
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Depends...

No it isn't immaterial:- If there were any intelligible signals received from a star system, our reply would need to be aimed at where that system would be at the time our reply reached it.

1
0
Silver badge

Re: Depends...

No point sending signals.

If there was anyone over there who could understand, they'd be much older species than us and would already know we exist.

0
0
Silver badge
Alien

I for one welcoe our space dolphin overlords!

And I remind them that as a marketing professional with opposable thumbs, I am ideally placed to feed them fish in return for a little tail-walking.

I'm still hopeful about the sexually curious amazon overlords too!

0
0
Silver badge
Pint

Re: I for one welcoe our space dolphin overlords!

Marketeers have opposable thumbs?

1
0
Silver badge
Alien

Slightly frustrating article.

So, we know the orbital radius of the planet, how long its year it, how big it is, the type of star and what we've decided to call the planet...

but for the life of me, I can't see anywhere where it says which bleedin' star it's orbiting!

Do you think there's something they're not tell us? Where's the tin-foil hat icon when you need it!

0
0
Alien

Re: Slightly frustrating article.

Would it help if I said it's extremely remote, and no human being will ever, ever see it?

1
1
Silver badge

Re: Slightly frustrating article.

I hope you're wrong, and it's merely "no currently-living human being".

Even then, if we pick up intelligible radio transmissions from Them it would have a pretty big impact on our culture anyway, regardless of what They actually said.

(Probably the alien equivalent of Radio 1)

0
0
Pint

Re: Slightly frustrating article.

It is irritating that it doesn't mention which star it orbits; however, as Kepler points at the same bit of the sky all the time, it must be located in a 115 square-degree region around where Cygnus, Lyra and Draco meet. So at least you can step outside with the Mk1 eyeball and look in the right place!

Beer icon because with this weather, there's no point in getting a 'scope out - might as well stay in the pub...

0
0
Go

I'm overweight as it is.

What would the gravitation be like on a rocky planet with a radius 1.5 times Earth's?

0
0
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: I'm overweight as it is.

Depends how dense it is I guess.

0
0
Megaphone

Universal suburban neighborhood watch

I am rather concerned that such proximity will have a negative affect on the current market value of our home planet. Given the vastness of space this potentially makes us semi-detatched, or, at the very least, end of terrace. We should be very careful during the initial phase of contact with anybody who is in at the time and see just how many shiny new space stations they have parked in orbit first. Perhaps if we asked to borrow some sugar it would help to encourage harmonious neighborly relations. Close the curtains now!

1
0
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Universal suburban neighborhood watch

Odd- that's just what they said...

0
1
Happy

My pink half of the worm hole

Jolly good, I'm glad to hear it. Obviously it is a true clone of earth. On the plus side, I am looking forward to potentially more exotic jams and cakes at the annual Universal Neighborhood Watch jamboree - there's only so much that can be done with quince and greengage you know. But, hang on a minute, as it's an annual jamboree, is it still our annual, or theirs, or somewhere in the middle ? Would this mean we get more than one jamboree a year ? I'll email the vicar and see if there's a conflict with the steam rally. TTFN.

0
0

One of Slartibartfast's perchance?

...and will the fjords have crinkley edges?

1
0
Boffin

How far?

So people (including me) keep asking how far this star is. Here's what I've found so far:

According to the NASA database at http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/cgi-bin/ExoTables/nph-exotbls?dataset=cumulative - rowID 1509, this star is at ra 293.260925 dec 44.868889

I found this using Stellarium (a lovely little tool for the amateur, though I had to download the smaller magnitude maps to find it) at RA 19h 33m 2.62s / Dec 44 52m 7.8s but unfortunately it doesn't seem to have a name or a distance. Magnitude matches at 13.8 though, so I think it's the right one

I leave this information here for anyone with more time to dig than me.

1
0
Bronze badge
Boffin

Re: How far?

The apparent Magnitude and the spectral type are enough to make a guess at the distance. This blighter is a really long way away, somewhere over 2000 light years according to the back of this here envelope.

0
0
Unhappy

Re: How far?

Time was I could have made that calculation without an envelope, but no more, alas.

Science aside, there's also something strangely satisfying about seeing it on the sky, even if it's a virtual sky (easier to zoom in on the right place as well then, plus you can draw pretty pictures over the constellations)

0
0
Pint

Re: How far?

So I don't need to get the holiday brochures then (and Scott Broukell can give the estate agentsa miss too).

Beers all round to those who found it never the less

0
0

I hope it's been sysprepped.

Otherwise we're going to have all sorts of SSID issues if we ever meet up.

0
0
Silver badge

Oxygen-rich atmosphere

Is not a pre-condition to life - it's a consequence of life.

Earth did not have oxygen-rich atmosphere until life developed photosynthesis and started producing oxygen on large scale AND most of the exposed iron on the surface has been oxidised (about 1.7 billion years ago).

I'd say if we ever find an oxygen-rich atmosphere around an exoplanet that would basically guarantee that there definitely is organic life on that planet.

0
0
Unhappy

Clone? With chavs and everything?

Please tell it ain't so. It's depressing enough with one chav-infested planet.

At least it'll be easy to tell, just look for the beige chequered pattern in the shadow the planet casts.

Also, when we meet, we can recycle the same jokes like 'what do you call a chav in a box? innit'.

0
0
Go

How far means how long....

The question of how far away it is matters not because of when the next GSV swings by to take us there, but of how soon until THEY GET HERE. We are fresh from the cave, but the probability is that they have been around rather longer.

Supposing that the above guess of 2000 lightyears is correct, and that we on Earth started producing detectable radiation 150 years ago, our signals arrive there in 3862AD? A lightspeed return signal gets back to us in 5862AD. Of course, if they have figured out FTL then we might get a visit a bit sooner than that.....

0
0

"Hang on, I thought we were first?"

I think that's what basically happened in '69 but we haven't been told yet

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re. "Hang on..."

Apollo 18 ?

Actually one theory doing the rounds is that the Roswell aliens originated from this system.

0
0
Happy

Distance to KOI-712-02 is 1010ly

KOI-712 is the name of the star, aka KIC 9640976. The -02 indicates this is the second unconfirmed planet orbiting the star. KOI-712-01 was discovered in 2011. Johnstonesarchive/astro/extrasolarplanets/html gives the distance for the star at 1010 ly plus other information, after -01 was discovered in '11. The star also has the 2MASS designation as J19115789+4621247. Scroll down Johnstones list of planets to 1010 lys and you will find KOI-702.

rex

0
0

No Moon or Magnetism?

Has this planet got what it takes? I ask because I understand that planets need a magnetic field or some other form of energy shield to stop all the inhabitants frying in the cosmic stream? And don't they need a gyroscopic moon to stop them flipping end over magnetic end?

Finally, on a more serious note, I understand that Apple has already patented this planet and all its subsidiary technology but that the picture has been clouded by the discovery of a Samsung dolphin allegedly very closely related to the species claimed by Apple in its patent documentation. Apple's lawyers are on the case as I type.

0
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.