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back to article Microsoft's high-risk Windows 8 .NET switch

Microsoft spooked .NET developers earlier this year by emphasising HTML and JavaScript as the programming platform for Windows 8. Any questions were met with the answer: "Wait until BUILD." Well, BUILD took place last week, so what is happening with .NET and Windows? You can frame the beginning of this story in various different …

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@ json

Sorry, when you say .NET, are you talking about Silverlight?

Are you aware that you need something on the serverside and that .NET, especially with ASP.NET MVC is actually a very good choice here?

.NET is fine for online apps, if you're saying bespoke browser plugin based solutions like Silverlight and Flash are shit then yes I agree with you however, but Silverlight is not .NET, it's just a technology that utilised .NET.

FWIW in separating concerns the biggest problem there is HTML5, which fails epicly at this. Microsoft for it's part is one of the better vendors out there are ensuring you have good tools to separate things like persistance, web services, business logic, and server and client front end stuff. A decent alternative is Java with libraries like Spring, other technologies like PHP and Ruby are pretty hopeless in these respects though - that's precisely why Microsoft does so well in the enterprise, even for web apps because for all their faults, they know what developers need to follow good practice software development, even if they're not so great at doing it themselves, just like the Java world understands this. The PHP world is still dominated by kids who really don't get even simple things like MVC and has yet to grow up, some projects make an effort to fix this like Zend, but others like CakePHP and Symfony create their own bastardised versions of MVC instead amongst other thnigs because they just don't know how to get it right.

Yeah .NET has it's faults, but it's still one of the best choices for doing really good quality online application development right now alongside Java. Silverlight, like Flash, and like Java applets though, is indeed shit.

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Anonymous Coward

and writing and consuming web services is such a piece of piss in .Net

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3

makes sense

It makes sense for MS to code the core framework in native code. You do not want the native stuff to have a 2x performance penalty because it runs on a managed VM. You can use this framework in .NET and you have good performance too. I think it is a good choice.

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I am probably not fair..

...but for Metro it looks to me like Microsoft threw its own existing frameworks out the window, created some heavily limited Frankenstein out of them, and now expects their tablet-only environment to be successful.

I was not sure that using Silverlight for Windows Phone 7 was a great idea, but this is just sad. And if they succeed regardless, that will be even more sad. Apparently Microsoft needs a Vista-styled wakeup-call every two OS versions. :/

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'tablet-only environment'

FYI - Windows8 can run in 2 modes: 'Metro' and traditional desktop.

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Wow. I recognised almost all the words but have no idea at all what that article was about. I sure hope that Microsoft's documentation does a better job of explaining their platform than this article does.

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Anonymous Coward

Confusion reigns (for a while!)

I'm confused, if the future is html 5, when are the standards going to be agreed? How much will they change in the next couple of years and what will that mean for applications developed now?

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Compatibility fail.

All this pollyanna wankfesting about Metro is nice, but it glosses over an important point: if you write a Metro app it will not run on Windows 7 or Vista or XP or any version of Windows other than 8. Are any ISV's going to release software *only* for 8? I don't think so.

By the way, if you haven't seen the preview of 8 yet -- despite Microsoft's posturing about the traditional desktop being relegated, all they *really* did was to replace the Start menu with Windows Phone. That's really all it is. When you click Start, the whole screen turns into a Windows Phone. If you select a non-Phone application it switches back to the desktop.

One might argue that Linux and Apple could counter this by simply replacing their Start menus with fully functional Android and iOS environments.

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No, the new "programming model" isn't COM, or anything similar. Actually it is called WinRT and it's basically a replacement for Win32. The thing is it's for Metro, the phone and tablet UI (which, for whatever reason, you will be able use on your PC as well). It's not replacing the Windows desktop and is not meant to. And programming apps to run in the Metro UI using WinRT is not the end of .NET. Hell, even Win32 isn't going away. So don't you all get your hopes up. Metro isn't replacing the desktop, and nor could it for the foreseeable future (what? Don't think being able to fondle your PC will increase your productivity?)

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Pint

Win32

forever.

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