Feeds

back to article Hackers crack Ubisoft always-online DRM controls

Hackers have overcome Ubisoft's controversial DRM system that relied on constant connection to the internet for games to function. A crack for Ubisoft’s anti-piracy system published by a group called Skid Row allows gamers to circumvent the controls for games such as Assassin's Creed II. A message from the group on a gamers' …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

45 minutes....?

We suspect these pirates may have methods of mass production.

0
0
FAIL

Planes, trains and automobiles

Same. No more games that I can't play where I choose. If it's an MMO, I can live with having to be online because that's the point. For single player games, I want mobility.

Lower prices, shift more units. Don't raise prices and add restrictions.

0
0
Bronze badge
Flame

Out of balance.

I can see the point of DRM that stops the disks being trivially copied

If I have to be on the internet to play the game? I know my internet connection has been down twice in the past month, by the look of it my ISPs side of things. If the game needs the internet--other players to communicate with--it's part of the package. If the internet is needed to check the install. there might be updates and other advantages for me.

If Ubisoft, or whoever, need to massage executive egos, why should I pay? They can get their own whores.

1
0

Gaming industry slow on the uptake

The games industry is soooo slow on the uptake here. Any IP can be copied and made to work without paying for it, be it a game, app, film, song etc. Tech isn;t the key - changing ppls minds is.

Example - have you noticed how they'd stopped showing those despicable "you look like a thief" ads at the cinema now (well, that's what they feel like to me). I go to the cinema almost every week (sometimes we';ve seen everything except Alvin and the Chipmunks and we have *some* limits). I pay to do that obviously. To then be told that "copying films is naughty - don't do it" having made that payment is bloody galling.

I turned to my lass once and told her it made me want to d/l the thing just because of that ad.

They don't do that anymore 'cause (1) it pisses off ppl that pay, and (2) the pirates just delete that bit from the file before uploading it so the ppl that don't pay don't see it!!!!! Huzzah! They caught on! Now they give you a little "awww, thanks for paying - we lubs joo" which makes me feel fuzzy inside (that could be the blue slush tho)

Games houses need to catch up - telling me they don't trust me and think I'm prolly a thief MAKES ME WANT TO TORRENT IT. Out of spite. Giving me a small benefit (even one that costs them nowt) is going to be far more effective.

4
0
Flame

will never buz ubisoft games ever

My last experience with ubi soft so quite bad :( The game didn't work because I have an emulator installed (which for the record I use only with legal ISOs - I have a MSDN Pro Subscription and the only way you download the software from it is as ISO).

Anyway why buy a game if in the end I still need to find a cracked version to be able to play it? I refuse to pay them money just so I end up looking for cracks and warez and exposing my self to viruses because Ubisoft tries to dictate what I can and can't have installed on my PC? If they would say all these restrictions on the box, so I can see them before I buy this piece of crap yes, but I just hate surprises and no refunds! No more buying from Ubisoft for me!

0
0
Pirate

Full text of Crack

is shown here:

http://nfomation.net/info/1272339111.rzr-set7.nfo

Razor 1911

they are quite mocking of Skid Row's crack.

it's an interesting read.

0
0
Badgers

@vladimir

Step away from the computer and go outside.

1
0
Thumb Up

Vote with your wallet...

I stopped buying consoles a few years ago because once they became internet connected I saw this coming... I refuse to buy any product with such draconian DRM. I refuse to buy a perfectly good product that was split into 3 products for the benefit of the publisher's pockets (Starcraft 2). I also recently canceled my WoW account because Blizzard is just getting greedy with the combination of micro-payment items AND a subscription fee. Cheers to the folks who cracked this proving yet again DRM has a 100% failure rate.

0
0

PC gaming dieing

Been gaming on the PC since 1989. But I think games creators more and more don't want to develop for the PC. I understand why, with the extra difficulty of make the games work on all the different hardware configurations, for less sales than on a consoles.

It is just not an attractive platform. There will still be smaller or start-up companies that will develop for the PC to show off their new game engines, without having to pay Microsoft or Sony console royalties. But once they have a successful engine or franchise the PC will then get dumped for more lucrative console opportunities.

The increased amount of 360 games ported have helped, but the trend is obvious.

What annoys my is the companies that blame piracy for them stopping PC development (eg epic for Gears of War II and III). That is not the real reason but what I mentioned above and games publishers should be honest about not wanting to put in the extra effort to make a good PC game. The conspiracy theorist in me also thinks that it is part of the games makers plans to put huge amounts of DRM on PC games saying if you don't like play the game on a console. I do think some games makers would be happy to not have to develop for the PC anymore.

Dice got a lot of praise for their support of the PC gaming recently with Battlefield Bad Company. But I have all the previous versions of Battlfield and like to try a demo before deciding if I want to buy. And guess what, this time, no demo for the PC, but there is for the 360.

As for me, when gaming on the PC dies so will my playing computer games, as I have never had much fun on consoles and I refuse to use a joypad to play an FPS. PC snob? Yes.....

2
0

BF:BC2 PC Demo

Admittedly they may not have a PC Demo (though one may be in the works - hard to say, as they do have both X360 and PS3 demo's)... they did run a beta for about a month or so prior to release which you could have participated in to get a feel for the gameplay. It was actually quite decent.

0
0

HA HA HA FUCKING HA!

Instead of spending a fortune trying to protect their software with a system that would have its pants pulled down, they could have made the game cheaper and consequently sold more copies.

You may say that then more people would have downloaded it if it had no copy protection...that's rather moot now isn't it.

1
0
Alert

Thank Bob

Now maybe my mate, who was stupid enough to *buy* AC will actually be able to play it. Whenever the stupid lame-ass DRM kicks him out at a moment of high drama, the language is nothing short of disgraceful.

He gets slightly less pissy when it just won't start due to the DRM servers being down, but is still pretty insufferable.

Hopefully he already has a torrent coming down. Pirates will definitely be at a massive advantage to people running the uncracked one with any recent Ubi game.

Screw you, Ubisoft, your ridiculous DRM got me a lot of earache. I hope that you all get eaten by gaint zombie clowns.

0
0
Grenade

copy protection is a mixed bag

My Dad was an amateur into slow-scan TV and he bought an Amiga product which was a decoder board and some cunningly copy-protected software. He wanted to make a backup but the disk was unreadable by every amiga copying program around. I took up the challenge out of curiosity, I'd never tried to break copy protection before. It took a while but I was very pleased with myself when I cracked it - it was a fascinating challenge, and I received no commercial gain, but I did learn a lot about tricks with the 68000 CPU.

Roll on to a recent event where my wife bought some CAD software. The program generates a code when installed and you then get an activation key from the suppliers. She upgraded her computer and they reluctantly issued another key, and then that new computer was stolen, and they warned her that she would have only one new activation chance again! Rather than waste a future activation, I worked out how the program stored its activation details in the registry so I could clone it. In the meantime I am actively looking for a crack, because if something goes wrong and we need to do a fresh install and the company are not cooperative, a crack is the only way we can use software we bought legitimately.

My wife also had a Sony CD which refused to play because it had some copy protection. I'd never P2P'd music before, but the copy protection drove me to try shareaza and piratebay to download music we we'd bought^Wlicensed legitimately. Once I discovered how trivial it was, I downloaded other stuff too. I don't make a habit of it, but having felt ripped off by the music industry, my qualms were much more easily overcome!

My point is that copy protection can cause sufficient pain to legitimate users that they are driven into the arms of the "pirates", and any amount of DRM will be cracked sooner or later.

4
0
Happy

Dragon 32 cracked

I worked out how to crack Dragon 32 games (tapes) that gave perfect backup copies (not tape copying) and I also worked out how to change the text logo that a lot of the companies used - defacing as they call it now.

A few months later (I was 14) it was the summer holidays and we were at the local sports centre for activities when I got talking to a guy who lived 20 odd miles away (light yrs away as a kid) and we got talking about computer games. He mentioned the Dragon 32 and started talking about this guy who had managed to make pefect [backup] copy of games and said the moniker that I was using.

I felt quite humbled that my recognition had spread so far.

1
0
FAIL

Sim City (1)

As a Kid I had Sim City 1, it had a dark red sheet with shapes on, you had to match the shapes for the code given by the game!

If you didn't enter correct code the city would self destruct with constant fires, earthquakes, floods etc!

Only problem is I was too young to figure it out at first :(

Oh and FSX Gold is on Amazon for £20 only game you need :)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Flight-Simulator-X-Gold-PC/dp/B001E95V5K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=software&qid=1272474103&sr=8-1

1
0

Can't help thinking

that there's a sizeable market opening up here for some competent programmers to get into writing good games (, CAD, etc.). Just not for the companies who are forcing this cr@p down the throats of their users.

Screw me once, shame on you. Screw me twice, shame on me.

1
0
Coat

no...

Screw me twice, then at least make me a decent breakfast...

1
0
Pirate

harder pirating vs harder cracking

As always, security is a question of how big a hurdle it is for the determined individual to overcome it. So actually, it makes sense to make pirating games as hard as they can, even it won't be impossible.

Now, what does this mean for me as an aspiring pirate (assuming that a buddy of mine has the original)? With a game without DRM at all, there is practically no hurdle for copying. A DRM requiring a second DVD device and a bitwise copy program is a one-time investment which will pay off. Or just install the game and give the original medium back. It gets harder when it is combined with a cd-in-the-tray requirement. This needs a crack. To virtually all of the world out there, playing a game without paying for it isn't worth learning how to do reverse engineering in assembly. So I, as your average pirate, don't write my own crack, but download an existing one. I risk that the file is either malware or a decoy torrent planted to catch me infringing copyright over p2p. Clearly, this is going to deter more people than no DRM at all. So using such technology is (from the game studio point of view) a good idea.

As we saw, raising the hurdle benefits the game studio. So why not use harder DRM? So hard, it gives the scene boys a month of constant nerdgasm till they've conquered it. Studio implements it, scene cracks it. Our potential pirate has to decide whether to buy or, erm, "borrow a test version". A rational pirate bases his decision on the hassle caused by DRM (which is bigger than in the previous case) and on the difficulty and risks of pirating - which is exactly the same as in the previous case.

A riddle for our game studios: what would a rational pirate do? (Hint: if you don't know the answer, who the hell let you manage a company?)

0
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.