back to article iSlate? I spy more control from Cupertino

Apple is probably going to launch some sort of tablet PC next month, probably on January the 26th, but is this a revolution in computing or a revolution in control? The iSlate will take the iPhone concept into a decent-sized package, but more importantly for Apple it takes the security and control model into the realm of laptop …

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Bronze badge
Troll

Or..

"If you want an open platform, buy any one of the dozens of other tablets that will appear on the market in the 6 months after Apple announces a tablet computer"

Or any of the decent ones that are around now and, knowing Apple - inevitably cheaper.

Put whatever OS you want on them, even OSX is easy to do.

Microsoft's concept slate looks better than anything Apple could dream up given infinate resources and the best minds anyways. Granted it's a concept but all indications are it's pretty much ready for the big time anyway, so it might be worth the wait.

Regardless, Appletards will buy this in their millions anyway without caring what it costs or if it's even any good (evidence: the iPhone, the iPod), so why should we expect the iYawn to be any different?

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Pirate

Developers, developers, developers...

"every single developer event I have attended in the last few years has shown 50-75% upwards of participants to be running OS X on a Macbook of some kind"

I'd ask what sort of events and where.. North America, probably, I've personally seen nothing of the sort - indeed they usually get laughed out, or abused.

The only places you tend to see them are in large groups of management types. People who actually write code, not at apple events.. Nothing of the sort.

That's what I've seen anyway.

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Yup, lots of Macs used by software dev...

Well, for the last 2-3 years, I have seen the same thing. A LOT of developers are using Macs, not because they are fanboys but because they are Unix machines with a lot of functionality for fitting into corporate networks out of the box. Yes, some people throw Linux on x86 laptops (I have one laying around), but a lot of open source developers who just want to get stuff done use Mac's. Never seen anyone getting laughed at for using one, must be one of those childish British rituals, like getting into fights at sports events....

And, a Mac's used by management types? Now that's something I'd like to see, because I've never seen it.... Almost everyone I know who has a Mac is either a graphic designer of some sort or a software engineer.

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Anonymous Coward

Apple kit

"Almost everyone I know who has a Mac is either a graphic designer of some sort or a software engineer."

Or an academic. Apple kit is very popular in universities (teaching and research staff, not just amongst the students).

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fgp

Actually

all the events have been in the UK (mainly London/South East) aside from a couple in Germany. These were all (mainly web) developer events and very few non-coders present. How about the last Open Hack London as an example? Those that weren't on macs tended to have netbooks running linux. MSDN events at MS in Victoria have shown a different picture but still a surprising amount of Macbooks evident.

I too have never really noticed any 'management types' using Macs. Dell, mainly. There are a lot of architects and designers around where I work and most of these are on Macs by and large, at least when out and about.

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D'oh

turns out I have two accounts here. fgp and Thom Sanders are one and the same so was responding to Martin Nicholls' reponse to my earlier message.

As I'm sure everyone was desperate to know...

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FAIL

Fail, fail fail...

And this is why I will never by an Apple netbook/tablet/thingie. With the iPhone, Apple replaced several small walled gardens with one larger one of their own; one so big (once the app store arrived) that most people could ignore the walls altogether. With the tablet however they are producing at least a netbook equivalent (possibly more powerful) and it would appear taking control away. I won't buy a device of that kind of power if I don't have the sort of control I have over my current desktop and laptop computers. I think it will sell in the US, it may do well in education markets, but there is no way I'd buy one for personal use with an iPhone style lock-down.

With regards to the question "who wouldn't want a desktop computer free of malware" the answer is again, for the average non-tech user, if the walled garden is big enough that you can't see the walls, who will care about the restrictions? I would expect most 'hands dirty' developers to be extremely reluctant to go down this path though because of the degree of freedom that is being sacrificed.

This is an excellent example of Apple's core business practice - build a device that does something well, but also has a built in source of downstream revenue. The real question is, can they get away with this level of control in the area of the marketplace they are entering?

Finally, I'm a keen OS X fan but any attempts to move this into the hardware I use will be met with an immediate and irreversible move to Linux. Although hopefully still on Apple hardware. OK, not that hopefully.

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Troll

@ Martin Nicholls

Microsoft's 'concepts' alway look good. They NEVER come to fruition, however. Sad but true.

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umm...

I know it's fashionable to bash MS, but I've got to call you on this one:

"They NEVER come to fruition"... except, obviously, for their desktop operating systems, which have obliterated every competitor in the last 20 years, and their current offering looks set to continue this trend. You say they only look good as concepts, but Win7 looks just as awesome in the full release as it did when they started showing it... And then there's the Xbox, which also looks awesome in the flesh...

Good use of the troll icon though.

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More rabid El Reg paranoia

Ask the vast majority of people if they wanted a computer that didn't have viruses and on which applications just did what they said they'd do and I bet they'd say yes.

Tell them that they could only buy software from a single place that ensured that the software would run and provided them with a single place to go and find things and I don't think they'd have a problem with that.

Say that it worked in the same way as the iTunes store or the iPhone App Store and, again, I don't think you'd have many dissenters.

Ask the same thing of the luddites that inhabit El Reg and you'll get a different answer. Isn't this the problem with computing? At some point we are going to have to listen to the users instead of trying to tell them that we know best.

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