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back to article Sony pulls plug on cabled power

Sony claims to have proven that reaching around the back of your TV to find that elusive power plug could, one day, become a problem of the past. The electronics giant has trialled an in-house “wireless power supply system” in Japan, which the firm claimed enabled a 22in LCD to wirelessly receive around 60W of power sent over a …

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Tin Foil Hats

And i'm supposed to believe wireless power isn't going to give me brain cancer.

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Terminator

I smell bacon

Reaching around the back of your TV to find that elusive power plug could, one day, fry your hand.

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Welcome

Re: who wanders round their house with a 22 inch TV?

I have heard that in Japan the housewife carries a portable TV around the house as she does the housework much as your British housewife might used to have carried a small transistor radio around (in the days before personal stereos, or DAB sets' need for mains power).

Besides the general issues of such wireless power transfer (like the RF magnetic field exceeding internationally-recognised human-safety standards by a factor of several hundred or more - in the case of US university demos a year or two ago), with LCD modules you've got the additional problem that you'd normally have large areas of sheet metal, which will act as a shorted turn and sap all the power. I expect they had to do some major redesign of the TV assembly to make it work at all.

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Coat

@Nikola Tesla

>"is rolling in his grave."

Quick, wrap a coil around him and turn him into a dynamo!

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Solves the age old problem

of the manufacturer knowingly and with malice aforethought suppling a power cord that is either between 1 and 6 inches too short, or has a box on it that is a few mm to wide to sit beside a piece of furniture - or is supplied with a "handed" plug (ie cord comes does not come out of the bottom) which is always the wrong way round - or all of the above

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Headmaster

Stunning Levels of Ignorance

Often, I enjoy the comments on TheReg as much as the article itself. But when it comes to this new technology, the level of ignorance about fundamentals of physics is just stunning.

I won't link you to anything that might assume you're got more brainpower than a slug, so here is a really pretty, simple, straight-forward demo for you all:

http://www.ted.com/talks/eric_giler_demos_wireless_electricity.html

The URL name speaks for itself.

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Happy

Did nobody read this one...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/10/02/tv_licence/ ?

If someone can just sort out the efficiency of wireless power to your TV, then you won't have to pay a TV licence...

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FAIL

Are splashpower still around?

Back in the early years of the 21st century, an outfit at that time called Splashpower were trying to use inductive coupling for power delivery for small appliances.

Some readers may remember it being reported here on El Reg:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/06/19/battery_makers_to_try_splash/

The technology was so succesful that in May 2008 they went into administration (as do a great many new businesses), as again reported here on El Reg:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/05/06/splashpower_fulton/

See also the non-product WiTricity.

Quite how this doesn't warrant a mention in yet another article on the non-product which is inductive coupling, especially at non-trivial power levels over non-trivial distances, is left as an exercise to the reader.

See also:

Wireless Power Consortium:

http://www.wirelesspowerconsortium.com/technology/index.html

"Short distance power transmission is usually based on the principle of magnetic induction. With this technology, power is transferred only if the receiver is close to the transmitter."

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@Don't tell you're insurance company

Psst! I'm an insurance company. But shhhhh, don't tell; it's a secret.

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Wright vs Boffo The Clown

"Do you mean to say Mr Wright that you can't get across the Atlantic? What an incredibly expensive and impractical waste of effort your Flyer is, you must be bonkers!"

Do you mean to say Mr Boffo that your invention cannot reach <insert-bad-country-du-jour>? What an incredibly expensive and impractical waste of effort your Custard Pie Cannon is, you must be bonkers!

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Magnetic fields are not a health hazard

The earth's magnetic field here at the surface, where we all live our whole lives (practically), has a field strength of about half a gauss. If a microgauss device like a cell phone can induce cancer, it's about 4.5 billion years too late to do anything about it.

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