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back to article Sony and BBC clash over PS3 problems

Sony has sent the BBC a stinging rebuttal after the broadcaster's Watchdog programme investigated an alleged PlayStation 3 problem dubbed The Yellow Light of Death. Watchdog launched the investigation because, according to the BBC, over 150 PS3 owners had contacted the show after their Sony consoles broke down without warning. …

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@Grumpy console engineers two cents

Your prediction is already true as reported in the show. Of the five consoles repaired in their state of the art repair van, four had failed again as mentioned on the show and were being 'repaired' again there. This sort of 'repair' and pathetic reporting from Watchdog needs to be stopped. Half truths and blanket claims for things like this are stupid.

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@Mike Bird

Thanks for those links to the Sale of Goods Act, it really helped. I recently bought a laptop and it had a dead pixel. I complained about it but the retailer stated they could only do anything if it had five or more dead pixels (even though there is no mention of this anywhere on their web-site). An e-mail containing suitable references from the SoGA and an offer of accepting a partial refund for the fault (one of the remedies the act provides for) and they've totally changed their tune.

Skizz

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Anonymous Coward

Actual failure rate is higher than 0.25%

Notice that Sony are only admitting that 12,500 (i.e. 0.5% of consoles sold) died with the yellow light problem.

What they're not admitting is how many are dead overall- i.e. completely dead, or failed with other problems.

The real failure rate of the PS3 is actually much higher than 0.5% then, and there's nothing to say those not included in this 0.5% didn't start with the yellow light of death.

This is a much bigger issue than Sony is making out by only admitting the 0.5% without admitting the rest of them. Sony's rebuttal shows the BBC has unearthed a major problem that Sony has managed to keep under wraps so far. Ironic really, but explains why Sony hasn't been crowing on about Microsoft's RROD for a while- because they have their own, equally bad issue.

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@ Mike Bird

What you say is pretty much what I said, but longer. I simply paraphrased it.

For what it's worth, all electronic goods imho should be guaranteed for 25 years. You know why? Because that's the industry standard lifetime for all semiconductors that have passed qualification. To pass as a qualified part they have to pass stress testing the equivalent of 25 years use. So people who seem to think a PS3 should last 2 or 3 years before it goes bust have a very low expectation. For any failure outside of pouring water inside it, wrapping the entire PS3 in plastic so it's airtight or dropping it from a height, then there must be an inherent fault with the goods. It could be a weakness in the silicon, or a poorly bonded wire, but that fault is inherent. In fact about the only thing that could fail and be even reasonably expected to fail is the fan bearings.

And before anyone says it, I was an electronics engineer, my job was testing semiconductor components before then moving to optical components. The most common cause of failure is bad design, not bad products. Don't buy a Ford from 1998-2000 ;)

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@ a 0.5% / 2 year failure rate is unacceptable

... get a grip

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Joke

who is this ...

"General Hardware Failure"? Any why is he reading my disk???

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@ShaggyDoggy

""Disk swaps are not possible on a PS3 since the disk is encrypted with a machine dependent key"

And they get away with that ?

I'd love to hear Sony's overriding technical rationale for doing this."

else all we would need to do is 1 person buy loads of download games and then just clone the HDs....

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dont forget your credit card company too

your CC company would also be part liable in these cases too under CCLaw

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People pulling figures....

out of there arse?

"Microsoft on the other hand have 60% failure rates."

Just one (the most extreme, granted) example of it. 60% failure? Oh my days.... I have no idea what it is but are you telling me that (for example) well over HALF the X360's failed? Wow! My mates and I are VERY lucky bunch then! We have four between us all and not one of them has failed. Lucky us!

Unless you were talking about another MS product, would be glad to know about it so I can avoid it! (with evidence of course and not just wild accusations and hear-say)

No wonder you posted as an AC.

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Watchdog are clearly in the wrong here...

A failure rate of 0.5% is totally acceptable and expected. I have had a ps2 in the past where is broke and physically broke a disc that was in the drive (laser burn). It was out of warrently phoned sony up told them that it destoryed a game as well 3 days later a courier turns up with a brand new unit with the replacment game that broke and all the leads were swapped.

How can you get better service than that. Not sure what happens with the ps3 because it hasn't broke yet...

As for for the xbox dont you have to send it back yourself and wait a month to get it back and they don't replace any games it's broken. Thats what I call service...

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@edwardecl

"How can you get better service than that. Not sure what happens with the ps3 because it hasn't broke yet..."

I'll bite. My xbox had the dreaded RROD. After filling a form on microsoft's website and the UPS website, a courier picked up the console the next day. After 3 days, the console was back with a replacement motherboard.

Dontcha love hearsay and wild assumptions!

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