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back to article IT workers grumble about lack of career path

IT workers feel frustrated by the lack of career development opportunities on offer, a new survey has found. More than half (54 per cent) of the 693 IT employees and contractors in the UK surveyed by recruitment agency Hays expressed dissatisfaction with their career path. Unsurprisingly, their response was markedly different …

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Paris Hilton

Moan whine moan whine repeat to fade

Choose Life not Drugs

"I want my employer to map a career path out for me"

Which reality are you guys living in?

It's up to you, no-one else. Leaving your whole career in the hands of your feckless boss or useless HR departments??

I thought IT guys were supposed to be smart.

It's a recession. you've got a job, quite moaning

When the economy picks up, go freelance, make more money, pay for yoru own training and stop moaning

Shees, anyone would think the universe owed you a living.

Now, where did i put the plans for the Improbabilty Drive?

Paris- cos she takes her future in her own hands

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IT's got a career?

f*cking hell - so what have I been doing wrong for the last <counts> 30 years?

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trade

I agree with the earlier post that IT is now more of a trade - just like plumbers, mechanics, etc. At the end of the day computers are a tool so IT workers are just glorified tool makers or people who know how to use that tool or repair it. I even knew plumbers back in the Y2K boom days who picked up some IT knowledge and ended up as Sys Admins or DBAs, and then went back plumbing after the crash - shows how easy it is for fellow trade workers to join IT if need be. It would be difficult for them to do the same in a medical or legal profession. In the old days - 70s, 80s - computer techs were seen more as scientists or engineers - remember the images of guys in white coats hovering over an IBM mainframe, but now we're seen more as experts on now to use and implement tools. Knowledge on a product/tool is king today, and experience sometimes has no depth if you come up against someone who knows a new product better than you do. I've seen techs promoted to senior tech posts - and they tend to slack off a little and can't keep up with the latest technology and managers have even less of a clue of the products being worked on by their team members. My philosophy is therefore to keep ahead of the game and constantly update your knowledge in your niche areas, and you will get respect and hopefully be rewarded and recognized for that.

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Grenade

It's not just IT

I work in a major science and technology laboratory, Phds to the left Phds to the right in every discipline you can imagine and the biggest complaint regardless of technical or scientific background :- there is no technical career path, to move up through the ranks which is the only way to a decent payrise requires you to develop management skills.

That said IT and computer science, since they are different things, are not good careeer choices esp. the latter. Computing has been dumbed down by easy to use tools such as Visual Basic, Excel etc to the point that large models are being built by non-computer specialists. I was in one meeting when I asked a near board level person what they intended to do about computing support in the lab. The reply was to ask for everyone to put their hand up who had a copy of MS Office on their desk; 100% of course and Excel met their needs.

With that attitude establishing a specialist niche for a computing career is hard work to say the very least.

But at least this article has convinced me that it's not just me who's finding it hard going.

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