back to article Homer Simpson 'nuclear waste spill' panic at nuke sub base!

National news outlets, citing "secret" Ministry of Defence (MoD) documents, are reporting that "serious safety breaches" and "leaks of liquid radioactive waste" have occurred at the Faslane nuclear submarine base. It's sort of true, but one would release many times more radioactive material into the Clyde by dropping a luminous …

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Unhappy

Is this like bird flu? Should I wear a face mask?

I read the Daily Mail/ Telegraph and Express all in one sitting and therefore believe any scare/horror story I read. I am currently awaiting a horrible, snotty death as a result of Swine fever (I spent the weekend in Wales on a dairy farm campsite), or the local hoodies will no doubt steal my kidneys or something.

Now this extra hazard to my innards has me scared me silly. Should I stop drinking mineral water or has death already got its steely grip around my ankles? Any advice gratefully recieved, though I should point out I do not respond to facts or common sense, only sensationalist outrage/ headlines

Isnt it time for our Glorious Home Secretary to set up some form of database to save us all, perhaps on a small memory stick for ease of use? Im no IT expert but im sure computers are the answer. Until they become self aware and kill us all that is.

Death awaits us all!!!

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Stop

Water and watches are not the same

Has is not occurred to anyone that radiation mixed with water might be different to radion in a solid watch face? Obviously fish swim around in the water and then we eat them.

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Joke

re:Is this like bird flu? Should I wear a face mask?

did you not read the daily scare the plastic in bottles water will give you cancer and shrink your testicles and leagley change your name to pudsey bare!! The only safe core it to boil all your water using your own wind farm (using mass produced electricity will make you physicality attracted to sheep)

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Pirate

"Nuclear" incident?

I think the point (missed, or not) is that by any sane measure, none of these incidents is a *nuclear* incident nor a *radiation* leak, it's just water FFS.

So if RN were regulated by SEPA it would still not matter in the slightest, if SEPA were competant, which one would hope.

It's the regulations that are an ass, as well as the scaremongering journalists.

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MnM
Go

desperate housewives

Being mid-refurb, I've had many a happy conversation about kitchen worktops lately. Apparently in the US, the secret is out that granite is actually, like, radioactive and will melt your children (to the great satisfaction of Dupont et al).

But then again my step mother invoked a 'blades down' policy for a year or two after it was reported someone slipped and fatally impaled themselves on the upturned cutlery in their open dishwasher.

All filed under entertainment!

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Boffin

This sort of thing happens all the time - media bias!

I worked for a time at an explosives factory in Derbyshire. Some daft bugger living locally got wind we had applied for a license to store radioactive materials on the site (low level stuff for a gas chromatograph - fairly standard testing kit!) and thought "explosives" + "radioactive" = "atom bomb". Needless to say it was whipped up a bit until someone saw sense and actually asked us what was going on.

Although we would have said it was safe, wouldn't we...

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Boffin

Nuclear FUD

It's crap. I have yet to meet anyone that can name the 3rd worst nuclear incident in history. We all know about Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, but in 30 years, those are the only ones with names; and no-one was remotely affected by 3MI (there wasn't even a "leak" as defined by a previous commentor).

...how many fires in coal plants have there been in the world, in the psat 30 years? And Nuke is not safe?

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Orv
Black Helicopters

@Scott: 3rd worst accident

Hmm. Now you've got me wondering. In terms of public exposure I'd guess maybe Rocky Flats, but it's hard to say, because no one knows exactly how much plutonium went up the stacks in that fire -- it seems no one had ever cleaned the stack filters, so no one knew how much dust was in them, and unfortunately unlike the Windscale incident the filters actually caught fire themselves.

I think a lot of the negative sentiment towards nuclear power comes from military incidents like Rocky Flats that were covered up. Often people downwind were simply not told of their exposure. That destroyed the government's credibility with the public, so now when the government asserts (quite correctly) that commercial nuclear power is safe, people are unprepared to believe them.

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@scott swarthout

the fire in the winscale piles that is as far as I know

and I only know that cos my dad worked on decommissioning them but I do not know of a 4th

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Alert

Media Panic-Mongering

The simple fact that protesters and campaigners seem happy to ignore is that for something to serve as a fuel source it must be energetic. And if it's energetic, it's potentially dangerous.

Scott Swarthout asks how many coal fires there've been. I'd add how many gas explosions; fuel fires in motor vehicles; deaths by electrocution... People simply don't understand that energy is dangerous, and if it's not handled correctly then it can easily do terrible things to you. Yes, even if it's been generated by friendly green wind turbines.

Still, that's an ongoing issue. The main problem here is, as most have identified already, the repulsive media and the delight they take in trying to frighten everyone stupid. Reading this item I'm put in mind of the TV reports - even from the once-respectable BBC - relating to the collision of the HMS Vanguard and French submarine Le Triomphant in February. There's no doubt that a collision between ships - and especially submarines - is potentially catastrophic for the crews. On this occasion, luckily, the collision was minor and the two boats suffered no more than 'dents and scrapes'.

But how did the BBC report it? They stuck a woman on a hill overlooking Faslane and had her make deathly-grave comment on how we only narrowly avoided a major nuclear disaster - both vessels being SSBNs. The item on the BBC News website quotes the CND chair*, Kate Hudson:

"The collision of two submarines, both with nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons onboard, could have released vast amounts of radiation and scattered scores of nuclear warheads across the seabed"

Well, I suppose it's vaguely *possible* - but it sure as eggs isn't terribly likely, as anyone with even a casual interest in naval or nuclear stuff would probably realise. But then, I can understand it's in CND's interest to create as much fear as humanly possible - given that it seems the mere knowledge of what a nuclear weapon correctly used can do isn't quite enough to convince people that the damned things should be dismantled.

Still, if I didn't know better I'd say I expected more from the BBC than this kind of cheap scare-mongering. But having seen their handling of the EVIL TERRORIST PIG MONSTER AL-QA'EDA BIN LADEN SATANIST PAEDOPHILE COMMUNIST WITCH DEVIL FLU PANIC PANIC PANIC WE'RE ALL GOING TO DIE story I can honestly say I didn't.

A free press is, I'm told, an essential part of a healthy democracy. Well, frankly, I don't see a deal healthy about either our press or our democracy as things stand. Sure: it's fascistic and oppressive and totalitarian to gag the press. But does that REALLY have to mean that they can't be held to account for publishing blatant lies in regular and utterly transparent attempts to stir up public hysteria?

---

* Always makes me wonder what's wrong with 'chairwoman', to be honest, if there's a woman in the chair. Is she ashamed of her gender or her individuality? Or both? (And yes, I'd be saying the same if a man had been described as 'chair'.)

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@orv

http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff100/fv00071.htm

http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff100/fv00072.htm

says it best for me

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N

Eat Brazil nuts

They contain small amounts of Radium thus creating radioactive waste when you go to the loo.

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Silver badge

On scaring people.

When they first came out, what we now call MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) was called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, or NMR imaging. It was called that because the atoms at the nuclear level were excited by a large magnet. It has absolutely NOTHING to do with any decaying material that is associated with things like Nuclear power plants (or atom bombs). To have something called "nuclear" in a hospital providing images people thought of X-rays and the like and assumed that it wasn't healthy for them so they refused to take part, even though is was probably safer than a normal X-ray. With a small name change (removing the work "Nuclear") and Presto-Chango, no problem.

I am also reminded of a picture my brother-in-law took of a remote monitoring station that was unattended for most of the year. In an effort to reduce vandalism, they put up a sign that said "Danger xxxxxx Radiation" (I don't remember the xxx Part). It was a statement of the radiation from the Sun, but with a large number and the word "Radiation", it did the trick.

Normal people just don't understand. These things are ALL around us, and they aren't going away. Sure if you have ingested micrograms of Plutonium, you will possibly die, you can also die from other stuff, Cyanide comes to mind.

We never learn! The sad part is we probably never will.

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Those Civvies!

Must be surely just the alarm system went off, false. No panic, Homer.

A properly working civil monitoring, wide view, just theregister, thx.

+ page four of the article could contain information about if there are no any moleculas of cobalt and activated metals gone off the board. The poor sub should be removed to the shipyard in case if the [beginproc spin] delicate substance all the empires are in now isn't deep.

Can't hold the horse of making the remark. Some Dec 08 @ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1090400/HMS-Apocalypse-Deep-Atlantic-submarine-waits-alert-nuclear-missiles-end-world--.html?ITO=1490 , look what a nice code they have for somebody: "The moment they discover true power. Violent, yet beautiful. Possibly the last act of the British state. The point where doubts may creep in. There can be no weak link. Three minutes to fire." The article ends with "you’re no more than 30 minutes from the end of the world". And there was an attempt to tenderly knock at heart of the British govt by means of posting a comment about the LETHAL COMPLEXITY of so preciously targeted mechanical systems... the counter of posts under this article in dailymail is still at zero point.

"There can be no weak link"... hell yeah, a wink leak turns out to be.

How many of such basements of policies, internationally, like this sub, are left lounging down the waters? And what happens with the Self-Reliance for fulfilling the Plans for the Future if the Machine will suddenly go haywire one sunny day?

There is a good Russian proverb, it sounds quite poetically in natural language and translates nearly as "If the door to heart is closed, knock at liver". It strucks when somebody pops up from a black box and so widely broadcasts his point of view on a secret submarine or an aircraft, portrays her appearance in action as he sees it. Such action is a heart attack for the sub and a road to hell for this kind of national mechanics, if one knows anything about quantum effect.

I understand that some posts appearing here might seem kinda shockin' for Reg... though IT seemed not really delicate [endproc spin] yet.

Re: news of the day - Go, Africa! Make Sputniks, Not Missiles.

73

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To be correct...

Moleculas (-: BYP

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IT Angle

What a waste

This is a BORING non-IT related article. Reg stop trying to do politics. Or I and others will be going.

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Stop

RE: Water and watches are not the same

I wasn't aware they used washing powder in watch face construction (the other definitions I'm aware of all being either fictional substances or units of measurement, apart from application in quantum theory and even that's talking about a hypothetical particle).

I'd always thought it was Radium used in watches, and even that had been deprecated in favour of other methods of luminosity. Still I guess if it's got a granite face it might be giving off small amounts of radon gas.

This would have no noticeable effect on me of course, coming from Cornwall, where I must have through my child hood eaten the equivalent rads of several thousand luminous watch faces in granite dust covered worms whilst sitting at the bottom of the garden in my den surrounded by hills of granite. Not to mention camping and orienteering over Bodmin moor (also made mostly of granite, actually come to think of it so is all of Cornwall's landscape) .... Help I'm a radioactive mutant..

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