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back to article BBC goes live... over Wi-Fi

No telly in your office? No problem, because the BBC has launched a live TV service for smartphones. BBC_Live_TV The BBC's Live TV service (left) also supports live radio (right) Although still in beta, the Live TV service is designed to let you watch a selection of TV channels, including One, Two and BBC News, live over a Wi …

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Umm...

To all those saying it doesn't work, you may also wish to check that whatever streaming software you have on your smartphone is set to stream via wifi/the internet, rather than WAP/any other option.

That's all it took to get it working on my Omnia.

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Cannot be watched outside the UK

Won't work in Ireland :(

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Blackberry Bold...

...Working Well :D

Just a shame about wifi only. Unless I get bored in a Starbucks, is a little pointless! Give it me over 3G, and we'll talk!

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License...

So how does it work then, i mean I have a TV license at my home address but say i connected to this via WiFi at my work address, where we don't have a TV license, am i breaking the law, or not?

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Jon

license

You do not need a license if its not live. So iplayer is exempt (at the moment) I would have no trouble if they made you need a license for iplayer as us license payers pay for that content you want. However I do think if you don't view live bbc or iplayer on your PC the bbc are entitled to nothing even if you watch 4od.

Also wit hregard to battery power devices being excempt. False: They are different in that wherever you watch them you are covered by the persons licenses not where you are, but a license is still needed somewhere.

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N96? Don't Think So.

For N-Series people, you need a hacked phone, python and the user agent changer thingy.

Google it.

Then again, my phone is set to be an N96 (its an N82 really) and it doesn't like it (although I can use the iplayer app fine!)

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To the anti-BBCers

The TV license is used to pay for all the BBC's UK services - TV as well as radio. At some point in future they may be able to adopt a subscription model, but because they're still the UK's premier PSB, they could only do so if free subscriptions were handed out to the poor / elderly etc. who couldn't afford the £200+/year (accounting for inflation and a bit extra for those that decide not to subscribe) - besides which, you can't easily do encryption on analogue services.

As for the alternative - allowing advertising - one of the reasons those who like the BBC like the BBC is that programming isn't interrupted every 10 minutes by 5 minutes of advertising. OK, so they fill the space between programmes with about 5 minutes of trailers, but that's a policy also followed by the majority of TV / radio channels - including non-BBC commercial offerings (e.g. 4Music / TMF).

The BBC currently has to walk a very narrow tightrope between PSB commitments (which politicians like but only attract a small audience share) and populist programming (which politicians hate but attract a much larger audience share) - hence the recent 'brainwave' of wrapping science documentaries up in dramatic reconstructions, thus killing two birds with one stone. But one thing the BBC can do much more quickly than a commercial broadcaster is interrupt the schedules when there's an event of major (inter)national importance (e.g. WTC attacks, Di's death), because they don't need to worry about losing revenue from the adverts in between programmes that have been dropped.

With the recent controversy over BBC Worldwide (err...how big is Lonely Planet's market share amongst travel books? How could the BBC owning it impair competition, when competition presumably wasn't impaired when it was in other hands?) they could perhaps stop advertising BBC Worldwide publications on air, and / or if necessary increase the price of some magazines to make them less competitive (e.g. the Radio Times is significantly more expensive than most other listings magazines - but then again it is a more weighty tome than most...)

Bear in mind that the license currently costs a meagre £11.88 / month or 39p / day - significantly cheaper than most subscription packages, and you get 9 TV channels, 10 national radio stations, 9 regional radio stations, and numerous local radio stations.

Although controversy and non-payment could be significantly reduced if it was possible to buy a license to cover all residents in a house of multiple occupation (e.g. student halls of residence) - evidently the cost would be higher than a standard license but it could be recouped by an extra few pounds on the rent :)

And just before I sign off, another potentially good idea: charter renewal should be carried out by a completely independent body rather than the government of the day. The BBC is supposed to be independent of government interference, but as its charter is renewed by the government of the day, it tends to toe the government line in case their charter is meddled around with too much at renewal time (e.g. forcing them to hand over part of the license fee to rivals - the fee is already subsiding digital switchover).

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Works beautifully

....working beautifully on my Blackberry Bold! Although, it does have to be said - only Ceebebies and BBC2 are currently broadcasting (To me anyway!)

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I've got it working on 3G...

It seems the Beeb have had an oversight - it's working beautifully (As before) over 3G on my Blackberry Bold (Vodafone)!

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Happy

Showing Blackberry Bold without WIFI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xk4sSjastZ8

Blackberry Bold 9000 (Vodafone UK) showing 3G or GPRS use only. No WiFi connection.

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ipod & nokia 5800

No luck on the iPod Touch - Not Compatible (Surprise surprise)

Works on my Nokia 5800 although its terrible quality

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