Feeds

back to article Yes! It's the cardboard PC!

Green is the new black, or so it seems. So an enterprising designer’s inked plans to build a desktop PC that does away with the traditional metal and plastic exterior, in favour of… er… cardboard. Recompute_01 Recompute: sports a cardboard body The Recompute PC would – if it ever makes it to the shops – have a body …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

Boffin

EMC?

How do they handle EMC? This thing will radiate like mad.

0
0
Coat

It's for Cloud Computing...

... 'payper use' :-D

0
0
Anonymous Coward

How has no-one else noticed?

How will it pass emissions regulations?

Strange, I'd have expected someone to have mentioned that in the first comment.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Interference

I don't see how that's going to pass emissions regs.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

RFI

What about RFI?

0
0
Flame

This isn't going to end well

I've had components on motherboards fail, overheat, and set the component and MB on fire - to the point where the CPU and heatsink had burn marks from the flames. The case itself provides a "fire shield" of sorts, so imagine if the case was cardboard ...

Flames ... for the burn.

0
0

Cardboard Fibers

There are problems enough for the fan motor collecting dust and inhibiting the movement of cool air. But dust + cardboard fibers clogging the fan motor?

It appears that the cardboard case has corrugations to allow vertical movement of cooling air, but the securing straps appear to get in the way of that. Also, the cooling fan pulls the air to the bottom of the unit, near the power supply. Which is where all of that cardboard dust will collect. And overheat the computer.

0
0

Which way is up?

I'm just a bit concerned about the "this way up" signs in the bigger picture at the bottom. Seems that the PC is designed to be upside down.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Problems

* Vertical ingress for dust (that would be the reason very few devices are top-vented...)

* Internal PSU. An external "brick" would be safer.

0
0
Thumb Up

EMC testing goes like this

"See? Nothing! It's absolutely flat on the spectrum wotsit thingy!"

"Sir, that machine is switched off."

"I know that, peon. We don't sell them switched on, do we? Make yourself useful: Sign this and fetch that roll of CE stickers..."

0
0
Silver badge
Flame

Interference shielding? Pah

Interference shielding? Pah!

I used to live near a MW transmitter and I never, ever had a problem running naked PC guts in the open air, without any RF shielding. Of course, this was in the days of many volts and few megahertz. Modern kit may be more sensitive to RF interference.

0
0
Joke

Yay! HP take note.

Ohh, how about an HP server that comes in massive amounts packaging, you unpack it, only for you to discover you just disassembled the server?

Imagine the fun of trying to put it back together again! We all know that somehow, the contents never go back into the original box.

0
0
Silver badge

Less recyclable than a metal box!

How could we go green? I know, let's replace the only fully recyclable (as-is, no treatment of any sort needed) part of PCs with parts which need an expensive (and pollutant) recycling plants. Way to go!

Recycling an old metal box is as easy as screwing new parts in. Repeat as many times as you wish (or until makers change the standard dimensions for components. B*stards.). Estimated lifetime: infinite (on a human scale). This cardboard stuff will need frequent replacement, and used ones will need to be sent to recycling plants, to be recycled 2-3 times max I guess. Estimated lifetime (including recyclings): what, 5 years, 10 maybe, if you're very careful.

Kill Mother Earth, buy a "green" cardboard PC!

0
0
Coat

How will you be able to tell...

...the fake cardboard ones they use to display computer desks and entertainment centers from the real thing?

I want to see the whole line of cardboard laptops and blade servers!

0
0
Paris Hilton

Re: If you want to be green, stick new kit in your old box 8-)

No comment.

0
0
Flame

[Typing]

Dear sir,

Fire.

Fire.

Fire.

We have a fire...

0
0
Thumb Down

April 1st

When I read this I had to check the date... no, it's not April 1st. Wierd.

And to add to the collective viewpoint: fire, dust, heat, shielding, etc.

Fail.

0
0
Bronze badge

@A J Stiles

I rather think you have got this backwards - emmission laws are about stopping electronic equipment emitting unacceptably high levels of EMI, not to stop the equipment being interfered with (of course designers do include shielding in sensitive areas for that reason, but for technical, not legislative reasons), It all adds to the background levels of interference which can affect the legitimate use of radio communication. The reverse is not true - an office full of unshielded PCs could quite easily affect things like WiFi reception and mobile phone reception.

Of course MW waves work at radically different frequencies to PCs and the conductors in a circuit board are a tiny fraction of the length of radio waves at that frequency so it was extremely unlikely that it would have suffered problems. Also an MW transmitter, by it's very nature, transmits over a relatively narrow band of the EM spectrum - of much more concern is "wide band" inteference than blasts out over a wide range of frequencies.

Incidentally, whilst strong interferences at MW frequencies won't interfere with a PC, it can be highly problematical to ADSL. Faulty equipment (although, not usually PCs), can cause severe local problems with ADSL and that is clearly perceivable on MW radios.

0
0
Coat

I think you've got it backwards

<QUOTE>Interference shielding? Pah

By A J Stiles Posted Thursday 5th February 2009 18:11 GMT

Flame

Interference shielding? Pah!

I used to live near a MW transmitter and I never, ever had a problem running naked PC guts in the open air, without any RF shielding. Of course, this was in the days of many volts and few megahertz. Modern kit may be more sensitive to RF interference.</QUOTE>

Metal cases are as much, if not more, for preventing the computer from causing interference to other devices as they are for protecting the computer from interference.

Mine's the one with proper shielding built in.

0
0

Insert tab A...

...into US B

0
0
Bronze badge
Coat

2 x 4?

If it was made in Israel, they'd surely call it a "four-by-two" (Cockney for Jew)

0
0
Thumb Up

lol

Interesting concept but the thing that really made me wet myself was Eddie Edwards comment at the top about marker pens. So true!!!

0
0
Thumb Up

Dell???

Can't see this catching on at Dell, but a good idea.

0
0
Flame

@fire risk people

cardboard is good up to 233 degrees C (not counting any safety margins), people build solar ovens out of the stuff (not to mention packaging designed to cook food in)

naked flames are a lot hotter than this, so yeah, it can burn quite well, so no candles.

but if youve got anything on, near or in your computer that is likely to hit those temps (like say, the rest of your house being on fire, or phisically placing the box on top of the heating element of a space heater), you've probably got other things on your mind...

0
0
Thumb Down

Gimicky and counter-productive.

It looks kinda cool but cardboard will do more harm than good. It's a protective shell for damagable parts that aren't so easily recycled.

Cases are easily re-used, and they aren't subject to the usual rules of obsolescence. I ditched my 1st ATX case at the end of 2007, it had been in service since 1997 and I've plenty more machines running in cases of a similar age. The one I'm working at right now is a 1998 model. With the exception of monitors I don't think there's another area of kit that stands the test of time so well.

IMO cases would be better improved with easier access and replacability of the power switch and any front panel controls as they're about the only parts that ever get damaged beyond simple repair.

0
0
Silver badge
Flame

Liquid Cooling?

I hope they also use liquid cooling ... using petrol.

0
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.