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back to article Boy racer cuffed for 140mph YouTube jaunt

An unnamed 19-year-old has been arrested on suspicion of "having posted a video of himself on YouTube driving at speeds of more than 140 mph", Reuters reports. The alleged Ford Escort incident took place on the single-carriageway A76 in southwest Scotland. Sergeant Scott McLachlan, of Dumfries and Galloway police's Roads …

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Anonymous Coward

Hmm

1/3 of fatal accidents involve men under 25. If you assume an average of 2 drivers per accident that means 1/6 of drivers involved in fatal accidents are men under 25, which tends to imply young drivers are just as responsible as old. While I agree my assumption is not very accurate neither is a figure of 1/3.

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Silver badge

Re: Speed Kills?

"If this guy had been driving at 140mph on the German Autobahn, he would have been doing nothing wrong. Why does his being on a road in Scotland make him a maniac?"

Could it, just possibly, be that German Autobahns are designed for these speeds, but single carriageway 'A' roads aren't?

"There's nothing inherently unsafe about driving a car at 140mph.". On a track or a road specifically designed for those speeds, no, probably not. It is, however, decidedly unsafe on any UK road, including motorways, which are NOT designed to cope with it

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@Bemused

The phrase "souped-up" has origins both in cooking and food technology advancements. Specifically, standard models of a car are referred to as "cooking". When someone adds stripes, large exhaust, then it's taken to simmering. Once the engine is uprated, it's "hot" - although this terminology also applies to inexplicable thefts of 1988 Metros from sink-hole estates by 15 year old morons.

To further expand upon this, the 1920s hot-rod community fuelled by prohibition and the need to run moonshine great distances fast in rural USA adopted cooking terms for their modified vehicles, but had to distinquish between these terms and the terms they used for their moonshine production - where boiling, simmering, hot, cold etc. would also apply (also fermenting, but that's more likely to apply to the stale vomit and spilled milk in the back of any Scenic/Picasso/Zafira middle-class virility badge these days).

Pop culture was taking hold - it wasn't long until Andy Warhol was to be born - and his influence was already coming through. The 'shiners adopted soup terminology with varying degrees of success - supercharging and skimmed heads were no longer "compression", but "condensed", as you got more bang in a smaller space (remember that early American cars had engines approaching 20 litres per cylinder, so like the process of making the power of Univac pocket sized, engines also had to be miniaturised - early days! I remember when the first Youngsmobile (they renamed them Oldsmobiles later) was released you could stand a full grown man in one cylinder bore!).

"Cream of" was an early form of water injection. "Noodle" was used to refer to the practise of adding additional leads from your magneto to the ignitors. "Won Ton" was the target weight and load capacity. "Cullen Skink" was the practise of getting in touch with the well known tuner/'shiner, Skink "Arthur" Rogers.

So, clearly the term souped-up doesn't involve actual soup, but does have origins in food production.

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Hmm...

... even if he changed the wheel size or tampered with the speedometer the police can still do him for being on the road. Last I heard the law permits a speedometer deviation of no more than +/- 10% from actual speed. Any more and the car shouldn't be on the road.

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speedo overread

For those who do not know: speedos are allowed to overread by up to 10%+6.25mph for true speeds between 25 to 70mph. There is no limit for how much speedos over-read when above a true 70. In my experience with GPS devices, the factor of speedo over-read usually increases when above 70mph. 87 is a bit too far out.

That ford could well have been doing around 120 – the driver is still a muppet for sharing the video though!

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Speedometer accuracy

Analogue speedometers are rarely accurate; early digital ones are nearly as variable due to the drive mechanisms, though in recent years instrument packs have become fully electronic even when the display is analogue. A good example would be a car like the Ford Focus, where a control module reset (if you've removed the battery, perhaps, or reflashed the PCM) will result in all dials sweeping.

My RX8's speedometer is an accurate instrument. It could be utterly accurate; the level of error (at least checked against GPS, which itself isn't 100%) is a constant 2mph overread; this increases slightly with tyre wear.

Older cars which have been messed with can be insanely inaccurate; they usually take the speedometer drive from the gearbox via a (non electrical or electrical) cable to the mechanical dial. Changing anything after this point in the final drive will result in an inaccurate reading, regardless of the technology - wheel sizes, final drive ratio, speedometer head (some have different internal gearing, others just have different markings and assume that the gearbox output speed will be appropriate to the model of car they're fitted to). Some modern cars take the speed from the ABS sensors, which would only be inaccurate if the wheel diameter were changed.

Due care and attention - using the mobile phone camera whilst driving, for example - is a fair prosecution based on available evidence. A further examination of the car would verify constructions and use validity - if the instruments are over-reading, under-reading (not supposed to under-read at all - a common thing to get boy racers on when they shove oversized wheels on their cars), tyres are of the correct type, etc. However, if an outright, clear cut speeding conviction results from the evidence as reported here, then someone should have sought legal assistance.

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Anonymous Coward

GLF

If you wanna go fast (particularly past primary schools and the like) - get a warrant card.

Only one *unt in the story, and he was the one with the pointy hat

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Anonymous Coward

So then "souped"

is nowt to do with adding a super-charger and then being careless with spelling. Loved your response. In fact it was so good I couldn't figure out if your tongue was cheek-bound. :))

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Speed Kills?

Speed makes an accident worse but personally I think tail gating is way worse. 50mph on a motorway is safe but not 15 foot behind the car in front. From what I recall don't most accidents happen on slow roads not fast roads?

Isn't the most dangerouse part of a motorway the hard shoulder?

Speeding is easy to prove, easy to catch, brings revenue and makes solved crime rates soar. A camera is cheaper than an officer, can't phone in sick. Sadly the car owner is an easy target for everything even taxes.

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Willy-waving

I'm so glad no-one got my point...

That the internet is nothing more that another vehichle (geddit?) for exhibitionists and extroverts to participate in some willy-waving. (Of which car-owners are the worst type.)

Or at least that's what it's become.

DYS?

:rolleyes:

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