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Online retailing can be a rough sport. The competition is rabid, customer loyalty is fickle, and IT expenses can go through the roof. That's why The Register can appreciate an e-tailer with a unique business model. A hawk-eyed El Reg reader points out that UK online retailer Ebuyer.com appears to be cutting costs by running …

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What's The Big Deal?

Even if the site did run on an amalgam of those old machines, what's the big deal? You can implement enough of the TCP/IP and a webserver on an 8-bit system to do just that. Have a look at ContikiOS.

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How could they miss

The jupiter ace

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Silver badge

Re: Cripes!

"Even my computer is better than these things. Heck, my computer could quite possibly do more than most of those combined."

I should bloody hope so! :-D

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Of course...

Of course there's no Gibson, don't you know how easy it is to hack the Gibson?

I'm sorry, I couldn't resist.

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I am reminded

That back in the day Easynet's core routers were called things like Centipede and Galaxian, which made traceroutes slightly more interesting.

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It brought tears in my eyes...

... someone correcting the article on exact (PAL) clock frequency of ZX Spectrum, A500 and Sensible Socker (Kick Off was better, I think), C64 and one cycle per instruction (kind of) processor (which is slightly faster then beloved Spectrum's 4 cycles at least), writing on border by changing background colour and TCP/IP stack for Amiga...

Gosh, it all reminds me how old I am!

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Now I see

I've worked out why their site can be such a pain at times then.

I'd have used a reliable BBC Model A or B - maybe upgrade it to a BBC Master (maybe even add the 65C02 co-processor)...........

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Anonymous Coward

They encourage me...

...to host my own website on my cell phone, since it is some 20 times more powerful than all those machines combined, at least.

Too bad it will a bit exposed to viruses, worms and such, since it has enough memory to load and run a virus code. These vintages probably can't even load viruses in their tiny memory, which kinda explains why they keep up and running since 1983.

Nice hoax, though. I bet, in fact, there are some chunky clusters behind the fake names. It is something like labeling 'salt' on the sugar container so the ants won't find it.

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Anonymous Coward

Server Masking

Nothing special about this it doesn't even deserve a news peice to be fair. Its a simple case of some little 12yr old utilising the masking capability of Mod Security or some such add-in for Apache.

Get a life you sad gits and stop with the shameless self-PR.

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Forgotten? Not by me..

Will no-one spare a thought for the Atari-800, I may have been a cmd fanboy in my youf, but that atari had some wonderful graphics...ahhh.

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Anonymous Coward

Was I the only one to get...

...a TI99/4A back in 1979 when Uncle Clive couldn't deliver a Speccy in time for christmas... Sadly, it turned up a few days before christmas and had to go back. Still, I learned to do more than LOAD "", and Parsec was class :)

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All work and no play...

"Nothing special about this it doesn't even deserve a news peice to be fair. Its a simple case of some little 12yr old utilising the masking capability of Mod Security or some such add-in for Apache.

Get a life you sad gits and stop with the shameless self-PR."

All work and no play makes for a very miserable individual. If you can't at least *try* and have some fun in IT occasionally, you might as well crawl back into a darkened room and order some more pizza. Mmmmm... pizza....

Obviously as this thread is read by folks that were around in computing the same time as me... does anybody remember the computer that was touted as "being the worst ever"? Was it the Oric Atmos, or something like that - I vaguely remember it being an attempted ZX Spectrum knock off that was built and designed so badly that it started occasionally and when it did it just crashed for no reason at all. Some things never change... :0

We seem to have missed out the Commodore +4, Commodore 128, Amstrad CPC, Spectrum+ (or whatever it was called, after sinclair sold it)... the others seem to have been mentioned. Would including such delights as the Sharp computers count as well?

As for the C64 "Executive" - glad I'm not the only one to remember that "luggable" piece of kit - portable is just the wrong kind of description!

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Duh

They're using an ISAPI plugin to put off would be hackers. Lame trick as a proper vulnerability scanner will see past this advertisement.

Tools here: http://www.port80software.com/support/articles/maskyourwebserver

Was mentioned on a Security course I was on a while back.

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Not all toys

Please note there's a Cray in there - probably just front ending the important stuff

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Nintendo uses its own hardware

Check it out:

http://toolbar.netcraft.com/site_report?url=nintendo.com

Nintendo uses GameCubes!

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out headers...

Our pen testing suggested we do something similar. I am toying with making our IIS servers report as apache 1.0 on an apple ipod (see ipodlinux.org for feasability).

If it has a chip in it then someone will try to boot Linux on it so maybe my headers should read: Apache 1.0 running on a Cod Supper.

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Anonymous Coward

Web Pservers

There were actually two web servers available for the Psion 5 (and other EPOC devices), one of which was written in Perl, so presumably it would be possible to run a site like that using Perl or Python based CGI for all the backend stuff for real. The bottleneck would be the Serial link only going up to 115K baud, so it would be a bit slow for broadband users.

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Re: Nintendo uses its own hardware

OMG! They're running Solaris8 on a Gamecube.

T3H L337!!!!!!111one!11eleventyone!

Hmmm... I wonder if I can run *nix on my Amstrad PPC640?

640KB RAM, 16bit 8088 CPU (Yeah, I know I'm lucky.), crappy 9inch LCD monitor.

Now that was one helluva brick^w laptop.

My first computer was an Amstrad 464plus, 8bit glory... in a 16bit world.

PPC640 (16-bit) made ~1987. 464plus (8-bit) made 1990.

I wish it still worked... *sniff*

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Cray speed

In case some of you were thinking that the Cray might make up for the relative lack of MIPS of the other hosting machines, although the Cray series was good at doing vector floating point multiplies, I doubt whether its pipelines and functional units would give much of a boost to running Apache, though maybe its peripheral processors could serve web pages independently.

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Ah those days back in ....

High-School. They had a WANG 2200 and I was at home banging on a Apple IIc soon to be follwed by a salvaged Apple III and then a Mac Portable .... monochrome LCD but the battery life dropped to only 6 hours with the backlighting on.

Ran my BBS of a Apple IIgs with a LAVA drive card and a DEC cable to string together a number of 20 meg drives. This was long after running the BBS off a Apple III with its single hard drive, dual floppies and that disk pack thingy that switched 5 1/4" floppies for you.

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God I'm old

" I vaguely remember it being an attempted ZX Spectrum knock off that was built and designed so badly that it started occasionally and when it did it just crashed for no reason at all. "

No Nick your remembering the speccy. I had the 48k rubber key and after spending 5 minutes at a time loading ghouls and goblins a level at a time it always crashed a level from the end forcing me to start again.

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Anonymous Coward

Pointless

Even masking the server isn't enough to stop a hacker. TCP Fingerprinting would give you the "actual" OS right off the belt... Totally pointless kids playing with new toys! and at the same time trying for self-PR.

Ebuyer are indeed the sux. :-)

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Anonymous Coward

They missed the best...

My old TRS-80 Model I made everything else on the consumer market at the time look sick. 16K RAM as standard and if you got the expansion box you got 48K and could drive up to two cassettes and eight floppies. Home of my earliest experiments with Z80 assembler...

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I am not a geek

ahh, I still have a Commodore 64 with a tape drive, could plug into a decent sized television in it's day, *sigh* ah the nostalgia.

Someone once asked me if it's possible to get internet on a C64... to this day I'm still not sure.

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Anonymous Coward

@Andrew

"Anyone who hasn't had it tough won't have experience of the 40 character wide display of uppercase alphanumeric only!"

There was a rather nice piece of software you could get for the Dragon that gave you full screen display, mixed case with a few fonts and controllable sprite graphics. All ran in 2k, so left you enough RAM to write something usable with the features. Unfortunately, I can't for the life of me remember what it was called, although I think that the company that wrote/sold it may have been called Oasis????

I could never understand why Dragon Data didn't buy the boys who wrote this out and ship it in ROM. They'd have had a world-beater on their hands.

Still got the Dragon. Unfortunately, the box that I put all the manuals, tapes etc. in appears to have gone missing sometime in the distant past.

TeeCee

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Anonymous Coward

Nice one

Of course they're spoofing. They're actually running PDP-11s. (Sigh)

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