back to article Cloudy CoreOS Linux distro declares itself production-ready

The developers behind the stripped-down CoreOS Linux distribution have pushed version 367.1.0 to the Stable release channel, marking the first time the project has delivered a production-ready release. Unlike other Linux distros, CoreOS is a minimal OS that ships each new version as a single unit, rather than updating individual …

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is this familar?

Sounds something like Beos packaging of applications. If not Beos, this has been done somewhere in FOSS before. Have to fiddle with it when bandwidth allows as I think it worth exploring. Seems like a way to bring microkernel stability to a monolithic kernel model if my limited understanding is correct.

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Re: is this familar?

I've had a (very brief*) play with it and from what I can tell it (ie: docker) is like a combination of the old BSD jails and puppet.

Basically it is a bunch of tools for deploying containerised applications automagically.

* I don't have an application for it so I haven't actually used it in anger. I might set something up in the lab should I ever find a potential use for it.

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Anonymous Coward

Linux devs/users idea of production ready is a million miles different to enterprise's idea of production ready, case in point - BtrFS is considered production ready...

Cannot compare Solaris' Crossbow / zones / ZFS integration to some shite like docker.

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Anonymous Coward

I gather you like Solaris' Crossbow / zones / ZFS integration.

Good for you.

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Anonymous Coward

BtrFS is considered a "technology preview" in RHEL 7, haven't checked on the latest Suse Enterprise yet. Yes, BtrFS is a bad joke compared to ZFS, but the OpenZFS project has made great strides and the 0.6.3 release has eliminated most of the SPL memory fragmentation problems. I have not tried Docker so I don't know if it is "shite". I do expect something that is just released to less mature than something that has

been around for almost a decade. However, if history is any indication, in a few years Docker will have around 60-80% of the features and reliability of the Solaris equivalent, and cost a helluva less than Oracle Solaris running on Oracle hardware.

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