back to article Amazon Fire: Who needs a WAREHOUSE when you have a global ADS PLATFORM?

Amazon could use its new Fire phone to help fight its way into countries where it doesn't - or can't - operate warehouses, says an industry analysis firm. That's the opinion of an analyst at tech beancounter Canalys who believes Amazon's new Fire phone offers the opportunity to roll out a global advertising system of potentially …

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Anonymous Coward

First problem

finding someone stupid enough to buy a Fire phone.

Who wants a phone saddled with Amazon crap, and lumbered with Amazon's rubbish app store..

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Re: First problem

The same people who buy Kindle Fire tablets?

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Re: First problem

@big_D:

People buy Kindle Fire tablets, because they are good value for money.

The Fire phone is no such thing. Obviously Amazon has a different target group in mind. The clueless and rich, I suppose.

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Re: First problem

I've already met a couple of Fire tablet owners who can't wait for it to come to Germany.

I'm guessing it will end up on 1€ down contracts, like the iPhone and Samsung Galaxy. That said a lot of people are switching away from contract phones and buying outright, which is why budget phones are very popular.

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Yawn

Yet another lacklustre wannabe phone.

"Hey, you can get ads on this phone. No apps, but ads!"

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Anonymous Coward

Vertical integration

While lots of people have correctly identified cloud as an example of technology going round in circles (mainframe with terminals, then discrete PCs and servers and now 'cloud') it's really interesting to me that vertical integration is back in a big way.

In the good (for IBM shareholders) and bad (for everyone else) days before the 80s big IT firms mostly competed to sell you a fully integrated stack and lock you in to using them for everything short of the brand of tea you serve.

Then a combination of anti-trust and disruptive upstarts like Microsoft (wow that feels like a long time ago) gave us a splintered world in which providers competed at every level around a set of standards which came into being without being owned by anyone. Innovation and choice flourished, but so did the number of incompatability errors and blue screens.

Of late it feels like we're moving back to the monopolist era, though from a slightly unusual angle (Apple are a consumer electronics firm, Google make most of their money in ads and Amazon sell tat but they're all trying to acheive broadly the same thing).

Their empire building strategies are really fascinating, especially Amazon's (Jeff Bezos' ego must be justifiably gargantuan) but I can't help but think that the moment one of them really gets dominant in all of the areas they're trying to integrate the anti-trust lawyers will step in before they can really monetise it (and that especially goes for Amazon, as both of the others are making pretty large profits at the same time they plot world domination, while Amazon just pour money into new ventures and cut prices while shareholders hang on for the ride).

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Hope springs eternal

Saw "Amazon" "fire" and "warehouse" in the title, and desperately hoped my FC had done an ASOS. Shame, the weather's really nice at the moment too.

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Tat emporium?

I thought that was Reg-speak for Ebay?

Amazon (to be fair) does shift a lot of stuff that isn't tat. Books would be a bit of a prime example.

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