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back to article GCHQ to share threat intel – and declassify SECRET inventions

Blighty intelligence and security bods at GCHQ will share classified info on cyber threats with organisations running the UK’s critical national infrastructure as well as declassifying some of the spy agency's intellectual property. It's all part of a series of moves designed to share its expertise. The agency used its IA14 …

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Anonymous Coward

Backdoors anyone?

Call me a cynic, but open source software from those who we know spy on us

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Re: Backdoors anyone?

Better or worse than closed source software from companies based in countries known to spy on us?

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They don't do this already?

" Blighty intelligence and security bods at GCHQ will share classified information on cyber threats with organisations running the UK’s critical national infrastructure"

Huh? See subject.

As for sharing with us things they've invented with our money, well, how nice of them.

To be fair, that's one thing a lot of American departments have been good at (NASA and its photos,documents; Darpa and the internet etc.)

What does Uk.gov ever give back?

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cmp

Re: They don't do this already?

> What does Uk.gov ever give back?

Reg:

All right... all right... but apart from better sanitation and medicine and education and irrigation and public health and roads and a freshwater system and baths and public order... what have the Romans done for us?

Xerxes:

Brought peace!

(ok I'm fairly sure uk.gov has never given me a bath but you get the point...)

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Re: They don't do this already?

I think we do baths better than the romans ever did, they were filthy buggers in the baths (well according to Horrible histories anyway)

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Re: They don't do this already?

"(ok I'm fairly sure uk.gov has never given me a bath but you get the point...)"

What? You don't pay taxes?

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FAIL

Bullshit!

Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit. Bullshit.

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Re: Bullshit!

And here was me thinking this had the smell of public relations and marketing. - My mistake.

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When the need to share trumps the need to know, new things happen!

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Anonymous Coward

I wonder what it'll be...

If they had public key encryption under their hats (brilliant bloke that ellis), what else do they have sitting on the shelves they didn't want to let anyone else have?

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Don't get your hopes up that it'll be anything cool. They'll surely have some cool stuff, but they aren't going to share that with anybody. I've posted about 'black patents' before, the entire concept is flawed and counterproductive. It's an invisible gravy train that finances countless small and medium size boutique companies and has fuck all to do with secret technologies, it's a commercial slush fund generator.

The whole thing operates like 'national security' issues and the flimsiest of pretexts are used to lock the information away and grant access to preferred commercial partners. None of the things I worked on during my days at ORNL is available to the general public, but not because it's scary stuff. Because it provides a commercial advantage for US companies and the the companies of our 'special friends', if we decide to share it with them.

People tend to think that simply adding a 3-5x cost multiplier to government work is the only benefit from landing those contracts, but they're wrong. You get access to an enormous body of IP that has been squirreled away specifically for sweetening deals. The 'black patents' are also used to close off contract bidding to anyone not on your list of preferential vendors. Jim's Software House (or whatever) is never going to get the gravy contracts because the costs of vetting that company for security purposes are simply too high, better to give it to someone with a proven track record of keeping secrets secret.

Besides, it would look just terribly suspicious if Jim's went from writing network admin software in VB.NET to churning out massively complex, embedded network traffic management tools and data mining system based on a proprietary architecture they figured out over a few beers. Look at all the ruckus caused by Palantir getting that kind of special access. It's going to cost a fortune to pad enough Boeing contracts to acquire Palantir without anyone noticing the funds moving around.

Like so very much of any governments operations, the 'black patent' practice is nothing more than a way to scratch backs. It sucks, it's stupid and taxpayers end up paying for the same inventions over and over. It's shit. That's the best way to describe it, shit.

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"cyber" security

Is this really becoming the accepted term? It just sounds terrible - whoever uses it, I can't help think they are just trying too hard and jumped on a bandwagon from the mid-90s, 15 years too late. What was wrong with calling it computer security or network security?

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Re: "cyber" security

I'm afraid you've got it backwards. Jackasses in places of authority have been using that term for over two decades. The train bound for Not Stupid Government Vocabulary left long ago.

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WTF?

Basicly another Cameron freebie for major industry whilst the SME's get screwed

Must be nice to get all the benefits from government be it money or diplomatic promotions.

Now Cameron gives them a free service whilst the SMEs and citizenry have to suffer or pay for their own help..

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