back to article Migrating to Windows Server 2012

What are you doing on 14 July 2015? Mark it in your diary: it’s the end of support for Windows Server 2003. Unless you start migration planning soon, 14 July next year might be a bad day at the office. Migrating to the latest version of Windows Server isn’t just a case of installing a new OS. You need to discover which servers …

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I can just about cope with the absence of a Start menu on a touchscreen laptop. But on a server?

You can take my Windows Server 2008 R2 when you pry it out of my cold dead hands!

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Agreed. Our experiences of just the UI on server 2012 were bad enough to sour us on it. It might have some good stuff under the skin but it's not enough to make up for a stupid, disruptive, timewasting interface. Server 2008 R2 suffices.

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Or....

just don't use the GUI?

KIDS!

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Re: Or....

Isn't that what Core is for?

The fun of migration is finding all the business critical systems that talk in a protocol that was in one OS, but replaced in another, then finding a way to hook them up again.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Or....

No problem, give me a working shell like bash or something like that, not that scrap of "powershell" and i'll be able to do my work without the GUI

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Anonymous Coward

Blood pressure rising

Just installed two identical servers today, but I have to do differnt things to each server, why can't you rely on windows server to do the same thing twice? It should also be called windows wait as it's click, wait, click, wait.... For those who say user powershell, I /cantbearsedtouseallthestupidlylongoptions /yesreally /Iwantyoutoexecutenow /yesisaidnow /ffs

Why did the save a few pixels on the start button and then waste vaste swathes of them in the rest of the UI? I could do with an MS puchbag round here, I wonder if Ballmer's available.

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SVV
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I'm, kind of struggling

with the combination of the words "virtue", "necessity" and "Windows Server" in the blurb for this article. However, I'd guess about 50% of SMEs will upgrade and hte rest won't bother, and the resulting license revenues will not be as good as MS expected, as they annoy yet another group of theirr customers with yet another episode of their end-of-support-and-force-an-upgrade tactics.

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I think there are a number of people on this thread who haven't actually used server 2012...

Granted, the lack of a start menu is a shock to the system and makes getting stuff done a little slower at first. But as soon as you discover the server manager, things soon pick up.

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Anonymous Coward

Ah Server Manager

where vast acres of whitespace on all the GUI screens make having a 27in monitor almost mandatory for using it.

We are in the process of moving from Server 2008R2 to S2012 and it is an almighty PITA. Lots of things have been moved and at times, I'd like to kick Balmer and the team responsible where it hurts.

I also agree that installing it on identical hardware is another PITA. After the install, we find that there are a different set of drivers missing on each system. WTF!!!!!! The systems are identical. Server 2008 on the same kit didn't have this problem.

Then there are the changes to AD. Grrrrrrrrrrrr. Much gnashing of teeth here. Group Policies that worked before no longer work in a totally S2012 setup. If we revert to S2008 for the AD then the problems go away. I wonder why? (The policy works on S2012 if the AD is S2008). What a lock of cock.

Is it little wonder that S2012 will be our last Windows server system. We have raised the white flag. Sure moving to RHEL will have its own problems but it is far more consistent in its behavior than S2012.

It is a shame because the underlying OS works very well but... for ease of use? Fail, mega failure.

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2012

I've installed close to 100 2012 servers replacing a lot of SBS 2003 and vanilla 2003 servers. If the start menu is a problem, Start8 works just as well on server as it does Windows 8 so that solves that problem.

Performance wise it's much more modular and less bloated than 2008, I find it quicker. I use powershell scripts with a CSV file of user details to quickly populate the AD for a new domain and cloudy Exchange most of the time.

And when it's all configured you can drop it down to core to stop people fiddling with it locally, and take it back to full fat GUI when you want to, something that wasn't possible in 2008. Overall I like it. But what do I know I only have hands on experience :p

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Re: 2012

Thank god, a sane post at last...

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Re: 2012

After working with Server 2012 for a few months now I can say 2012 (R2 for me) is actually a pretty good OS and has a lot of nice features if you just stop be adverse to change.

As for PowerShell, right, like various *nix scripting languages are a walk in the park. PowerShell actually makes a lot of sense and if you take the time to learn it you can do a lot with very little typing.

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