Feeds

back to article Russians turn Raspberry Pi into fully-fledged autopilot

Anyone with an interest in Raspberry Pis and autopilots – in common with the Low Orbit Helium Assisted Navigator (LOHAN) team – should nip down to Indiegogo to check out the Navio: an impressive-looking autopilot shield for the diminutive fruity computer. The Russian team behind the Navio is already well on the way to raising …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Anonymous Coward

As long as

they don't start using them in Aeroflot.

2
1
Bronze badge
Devil

Re: As long as

Probably better than what Aeroflot have used in the past...

3
2
Bronze badge

Re: As long as

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the inflatable autopilot they used in Airplane, which is the same model as the one used by Aeroflot.

11
0
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: As long as

Yup - if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

2
0
Facepalm

Re: As long as

As long as you don't have to re-inflate it!

2
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: As long as

given that the pi autopilot can't drink...

0
0
Bronze badge
Go

Awesome!!

Hope they get it working, I would certainly use it.

4
0
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Awesome!!

Yes, it's a good bit of kit. I suspect people will use ArduPilot software.

2
0
Silver badge
Joke

So this is a Raspberry Pilot?

Thank you, thank you, I'll be here all week.

14
0
Coat

Absurd...

The entire project is Pi in the sky.

11
0
Anonymous Coward

black

helicopters

0
0
Silver badge
Happy

Re: black

Beaglebone Black helicopters?

Don't go there...

0
0

Don't consumer-grade GPS chips stop working when they detect you're travelling above a certain speed and/or altitude, to stop terrorists from making their own guided missiles?

1
1
Silver badge

If your Raspberry Pi starts going 300mph at 12,000ft, I will personally shake your hand and buy you as many beers as you like.

13
0
Bronze badge

@James 47

I heard that too - someone told me a non-military GPS unit must have a design ceiling of 60,000 feet for exactly that reason.

So I just had a look at Wikipedia and apparently it's true:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System#Restrictions_on_civilian_use

0
2

Re: @James 47

That's one reason you need a GNSS receiver for serious work.

1
1
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: @James 47

You mean for re-entry?

Mirv, can you hear me? Mirv? Mirv? Oh, there you are...

0
0
Thumb Up

@James 47

The restrictions only seem to apply to GPS units coming from the US. The project is Russian, and they're using units made by the Swiss company "U-blox", so I don't think this is going to be an issue.

6
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: @James 47

You mean non-GPS (NAVSTAR if you will) GNSS, but good point. :)

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: @James 47

> The restrictions only seem to apply to GPS units coming from the US.

Unless it's changed in the last decade and a half, one of the licensing conditions the Americans imposed for building GPS kit was that a) you should have a "manufacturing facility" (which for non-American companies has always been a nominal one) in the US, and b) that you should comply with the aforementioned speed+altitude restrictions.

Details are hazy though and things might have changed. In any case, U-blox incorporate this restriction.

2
0

700+ mph at 36000+ ft. Unmodified raspberry Pi + Raspian + some custom software.

I like most premium lagers, thanks.

1
0
Thumb Down

Re: @James 47

You mean for something other than lobbying the Government to protect itself from its own weakness?

"We're so frail and weak against the terrestrial-demons.....and we do serious work, so please Godverment help us!" Yes, thank the Godverment for GNSS, and their serious work!!

The "Tectonic" quake would have been so disastrous, for you! Ummmm......exposing your own Denial of Service vulnerability? Nice.

0
0
Boffin

Re: @James 47

The wiki article specifically states that non-US made chips can be free from this restriction and be marketed as such. And this shield is made in Russia, with components probably sourced in China.

2
0
Silver badge

"one of the licensing conditions "

What licensing conditions?

Anyone can build a GPS receiver and listen to the signals if they have the time and technical inclination. There are no enforceable licensing conditions.

There are various projects on the www using either FPGAs or sw to do the correlators so there really is no need to even use commercial chipsets.

4
0
Silver badge
Windows

Re: "one of the licensing conditions "

> 2014

> Using GPS to put a force package on target

Instead of honest-to-God real-time terrain recognition in a matchbox the way the original Tomahawk Cruise Missile was doing it via a baseball-sized computer back when Reagan talked about the Evil Empire on TV.

Youngsters. These days they just want to have it easy.

3
0
Silver badge

Re: "one of the licensing conditions "

You can build your own GPS receiver....no licences issues there....

http://www.aholme.co.uk/GPS/Main.htm

0
0

Re: "one of the licensing conditions "

Yes, anyone can build a GPS, and it might be the size of a pentium motherboard, or bigger.

The developers of the modern chips in the USA were told to incorporate 'envelope restrictions', which would stop aspects of operation of these conditions were exceeded.

Now with drones galore, what can they do?

Some aspects in this search to round out the topic.

http://bit.ly/1tKMH2v

0
0

may not be a fully functional autopilot code?

The team notes that "at the moment of shipment there may not be a fully functional autopilot code"

I think I'd rather have a) no code or b) fully functional code, anything in between is dangerous.

3
5

Re: anything in between is dangerous.

anything in between is interesting.

There, FTFY

6
0
Silver badge
Coat

If you sell them by auction...

is it a Raspberry Pilot?

2
0
Silver badge

To big and too expensive

You can get a device with built in GPS and a degree of Arduino compatibility (you can program it from the Arduino IDE at least) for less than $30 these days. It's called a NavSpark, and it has a 100MHz 32 bit core with FPU so it's quite fast enough for this kind of work. Add a 10DOF sensor and a PWM controller and you should have change out of $60, plus a much smaller and lighter system.

0
1

uBlox gps chips have a flight mode command switch which allows use above 12,000m as long as the speed of movement stays below a certain limit (300mph has been mentioned elsewhere)

different makers seem to have interpreted the gps restrictions in different ways,

ublox have taken the view that max height AND max speed = restriction

others have taken the view that max height OR max speed = restriction

1
0
Bronze badge

Weird

I've always thought that having an autopilot running on a non real-time OS wouldn't really be ideal ?

ardupilot runs on arduinos of course, and recently on 32 bit arms for more speed/timers/etc but it is still running 'on the wire' so to speak - no OS.

Is there a pi compatible realtime linux OS ? And if not, other than getting a bit more oomph, this seems a bit of a dead end imho ? better to have your autopilot running on a protected realtime chip and just interfacing to the pi when you needed the CPU power ? i.e. just buy a 40 quid ardupilot (accelerometer, gyros, barometer, gps, arduino, etc) and just interface to the Pi via SPI or I2C for whatever wonders you need the pi to do (e.g. say recording video, image recognition, etc)

1
0
Gold badge

Re: Weird

I believe that Moar Power will come, in the Next Generation...

0
0

Disappointed

32 comments and not one "Think in Russian" quip?

(Posted from Firefox)

3
0
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Disappointed

Firefox just crashed on me. Have an upvote.

0
0

This looks cool

At the moment I have a Pi with GPS/magnetometer/Sonar so it knows where it is, and I'm getting a servo board which will feed into my dedicated flight controller (KK), but a single board that does all this will be cool.

If this board is going to be an all-in-one solution (flight control and location/direction) it will be great, but depends on how much work the Pi is going to do (and how much IO is still available), I hope the board is going to do all the flight control (specifically stabilisation, level, altitude hold etc.) and leave all the CPU to do the actual navigation, operate a camera etc. (and with Rx input it should be fantastically controllable for manual override).

Price is going to be the biggie, a KK flight controller is £20, servo board £20, GPS £25, magnetometer £2, sonar £2 so $145 for an integrated bit of kit is good, not bite your hand off good, but probably the best bit of "all-in-one" for the price.

1
0
This topic is closed for new posts.