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back to article AMD unleashes savage bird of prey on Internet of Burly, Brawny Things

AMD has released the second generation of its R-Series chips, code-named "Bald Eagle", aiming them squarely at the high end of the embedded market. What segments might those be? How 'bout arcade and casino gaming, medical imaging and imaging-assisted surgical systems, ultrasound, industrial control and automation, military and …

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"Not every embedded use case needs a GPU – unless you play games on your router"

But some kind of parallel processing could be handy. e.g. transcoding video for your shiny new smart TV that doesn't support many(any) formats. My router already supports USB HD and serving files, not a big leap really.

I suppose that's what AMD are trying to get at, no-one would put a graphics card in a router, but including an embedded GPU in the main processor might be handy for other things.

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Pint

molecular.....

dynamics and other computational tools...!

100TFlop chip please....

P.

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Ummm, a router with a built in VPN endpoint could probably use the GPU instead of a separate chip. Oh wait, would that count as playing games with the NSA?

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Only if you can massively paralellize your stream, single message will very slow compared to a CPU - there is areason why GPUs haven't displaced CPUs...

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Holmes

The other 17 per cent, Aylor said, are "legacy architectures like PowerPC and MIPS that are on the decline."

Actually, 2013 MIPS sales are up 23% from 2012. It's getting attention from markets where everyone else is using ARM and there is little differentiation in the firmware, so they are going with different hardware. MIPS has better bit manipulation than ARM which gives MIPS an advantage in control oriented code.

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