back to article Customer sues Nimbus Data for 'breach of contract' over arrays

Flash array vendor Nimbus Data is being sued by a customer for breach of contract over two Gemini arrays that the purchaser alleges failed to meet "four conditions of sale". The customer is Maximus Inc, a publicly traded company headquartered in Reston, Virginia. It is an operator of government health and human services …

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Public testimonial

In the upper right corner of the quote it says "Quote contingent on a public testimonial within 30 days of installation". I wonder if Maximus supplied a public testimonial, or if that's what the lawsuit is supposed to be.

Also, it's nice to see an article about lawsuits that don't involve patents. Patent lawsuits seem like tedious, drawn-out flamewars. Breach-of-contract seems a bit more straightforward.

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Anonymous Coward

If you allow the IT guy who's distracted by the bright shiny object to make the decisions, you only have yourself to blame.

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It appears it's just the one item

It looks like the only function that's not available is the ability to upgrade HALO software and "observe controller failover." Perhaps Nimbus hasn't worked out how to seamlessly failover through an upgrade on an active system. I'm not familiar with Nimbus/HALO, but it's going to be an operation that's got to execute carefully. If Nimbus' configuratin is active/active, you'd have to first force all operations over to one controller, then upgrade the other, then force operations (these are live, active I/O controller sessions) over to the newly updated controller then upgrade the second controller, then go back to splitting operations between the two controllers.

Our NetApps do this OK, but I'll admit to being impressed by it generally working without much drama. Oracle can't support it with many of its database patches, even in a RAC - you have to shut down the database to patch. (admittedly disk I/O is much less complex than database transactions).

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Would that the UK history of failed IT projects within the NHS was handled in a similar way.

But the repeated incompetence of the NHS negotiating teams to properly specify a project and some real conditions of acceptance with penalty conditions is always matched by the greed of the IT companies to walk away from such badly described and negotiated projects.

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