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back to article Global cop co-operation treaties need cloudy reboot

International treaties that allow police forces and spookhaüses around the world to collaborate are starting to creak beneath the weight of the cloud, and will soon need a refresh, according to Tim Morris, national manager for high technology crime operations at Australia's Federal Police. Speaking at the CeBit Australia …

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Was landgrab

Now cloudgrab. My question would be, who sets the limits?

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Gone fishing

What bothers me is the potential for J. Edgar Hoover style fishing; the moment a name would come up in front of him, he would instruct his agents to pull up every they could find about someone in order to have the ability to lever the individual in Hoover's favour.

With all metadata stored and available to powers who may not be totally ethical, it gives them the ability to rake around retrospectively and cobble together bits and pieces that in the context they use them could be used against an otherwise innocent person.

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Easy when you know how.

" ...when Police try to access data stored in the cloud it will likely be harder to collar the bad guys as the nations involved try to figure out jurisdictional issues."

Not if you are the USA it isn't.

As in the recent case where Microsoft has been ordered by a US Judge to hand over data stored in Dublin. I think that the US authorities have already side-stepped this issue and have decided to treat the rest of the world as if US law was supreme.

Just impose the law of the US on everyone and bingo! Problem solved.

Not sure how well this will be received in other jurisdictions though. For some reason a lot of people seem to dislike this idea.

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Re: Easy when you know how.

Exactly, which is very worrying. It pretty much makes it impossible to use a cloud service in Europe, especially for business, if the cloud business has any business relationship in America.

I have to store my data following German data protection rules, which means "I" cannot give it to US authorities without a valid EU search warrant. If my cloud provider gives it to them, even without telling me, then I am liable to prosecution for breaking German law.

Such attitudes as shown by the US judge are untennable in cloud business: "It would cost the US Government time and money, so we want you to break the law where the data is held and give it to us without a valid warrant for the jurisdiction where the data is held.."

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"Media attending Franzi's speech were prohibited from “ tweeting, filming, recording or transcribing” his words.

And that fucking says it all.

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