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back to article El Reg posse prepares for quid-a-day nosh challenge

The countdown to this year's Live Below the Line challenge has begun, and next week, the elite El Reg Quid-A-Day Nosh Posse will attempt to survive for five days on a food budget of just £1 per day. I did the challenge in 2013, and raised a good wedge of cash for Malaria No More UK. Magnificently, five brave souls have agreed to …

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A few bob in the jar from me

Good luck to you all.

Paddy

PS Does roadkill count? (just asking)

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Re roadkill

Maybe, if you didn't kill it deliberately.

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Re: A few bob in the jar from me

PS Does roadkill count? (just asking)

Only if you're not the one that ran it over. Otherwise the cost of petrol has to be factored into your procurement.

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A meagre amount added in the jar from me - now dance monkeys dance!

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I still need to investigate how I can get some protein on the cheap.

I hear flies are one way to survive.

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Re: I still need to investigate how I can get some protein on the cheap.

The cheapest source of protein is probably milk, especially if you can manage to buy it at farm gate prices. Tesco want 89p for two pints whereas my uncle the dairy farmer gets 19p per litre.

Ask nicely and I'm sure he could give you 5 litres for a quid. Already pasteurised, too.

Your cheapest carbs are almost certainly potatoes. Veg probably goes with a big-ass bag of frozen peas.

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Re: I still need to investigate how I can get some protein on the cheap.

The cheapest source of protein is probably milk,

Far from it. Pulses are a whole lot cheaper: a 90p bag of lentils will expand to sufficient protein for a week.

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Pint

Would have joined in but...

...blah, blah, excuses nobody cares about.

Instead have some cash to the worthy cause and maybe next time I won't be in the fortunate position of having a conflicting event get in the way.

(beer, waiting for each of the team at the end of next week!)

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I was on the dole once.

I was told by the job centre words to this effect:

"The government has calculated you need £35 per week to survive. We are going to give you £27." WTF?

I only survived because a friend worked the night shift at a local petrol station. He gave me all the food that went out of date at midnight.

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I wonder if my €48.00 a month food bill would count? Yes I will admit to having a friend that works in a fruit and veg shop that brings me some of what they are throwing out on approximately weekly intervals.

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If you buy your eggs at farmfoods, you can squeeze in an extra few p. its £1 for 15.

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Bargains galore!

Well, I buy 800g loaves of fresh bread (that have reached their conservative sell-by date) for 10p each in the evenings at Tesco. So I have easily beaten £5 A WEEK on all food, and that includes joints of roast meat and salmon (all 80-90% off) Asda do similarly.

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Re: Bargains galore!

Doesn't quite follow the spirit of the challenge though does it.

Only a few people can do that - and in the places where £5 would be considered luxury - they don't have supermarkets literally throwing food away...

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Re: Bargains galore!

Wait even longer and you can "buy" it for nowt in the bins round the back.

Sadly, the big supermarkets are now padlocking their bins for this reason, and charging people with theft.

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I live on a farm

Would eating my own stuff be cheating?

I get a dozen eggs a day, plus duck eggs.

And there's a fox I need to shoot...

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Re: I live on a farm

Wouldn't be cheating, as long as you incorporated the cost of the chicken feed in your £1 a day :-)

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Re: I live on a farm

Bah, I only feed them chicken food in the winter.

In the spring/summer it's "Get yer arses outside and forage!"

That's why I need to shoot the fox.

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Re: I live on a farm

One you've shot the fox you can eat it too, just remember to account for the cost of the bullet and a (very small) percentage of the rifle.

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It always surprises me

That the food most folk buy for these things seems to come mainly from supermarkets. If you're really on a budget then scouring street markets or, at a push, the likes of Aldi and Liddl (mostly for what's on special offer) seems a better bet. Shopping direct from farms, foraging etc also seem to be ignored. Your third world inhabitant doesn't have to feed the same number of middle men that we do.

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Re: It always surprises me

It surprised me too. I did a lot of searching to see where I could get variety, cheaply - I had expected, for example, to get vegetables from my usual market stall who usually have lots of 'all these veggies in the tub for a quid' but this week everything seems to have increased to thirty bob.

Aldi turned up trumps on the veggies, milk, and eggs; well under half the price of the market. Some beans were from my local Turkish/Indian/Chinese supermarket but surprisingly Waitrose had the cheapest black beans. And the bacon was hideously expensive compared to what is available, but it's good free range bacon, properly cured, and *not* 20% water. I have to have some standards! The butcher did offer me pig's trotters which might have made more sense, but there are SPB traditions to be upheld.

My intent here is not to prove it can be done; it is to see how it can be done while still making a range of flavours and textures - hence different beans and a lot of spices. I can't enumerate those; they're all from the cupboard and we tend to buy in large quantities of which I will be using a tiny fraction. Jam is from last year's garden and woodland fruits, so there's just the sugar cost - and I make low sugar jam as I'm diabetic. And the slow-grown sourdough bread is not only better for me but it tastes a damn sight better than the sliced flannel that has been wished on this country since the Chorleywood process was invented. I could have used a cheaper flour but the taste and texture would have suffered.

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Re: It always surprises me

Last time this was on some foraging was done.

There as a fascinating tour of the local woods and examples of edible fungi were found.

God. If I had to live off mushrooms I might prefer to starve.

I hate mushrooms...

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Re: It always surprises me

Thing is, supermarkets know that you're not going to shop around on a weekly/"big" shop, so bargains in one area are offset in others. Often they sell stuff below cost, knowing they'll make it up elsewhere.

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Eaiser to do as a group and in the USA

We are a family of 4 based in the USA so our budget would work at at $1.50 per a person per Diem or $30 total. Although the exchange rate with the UK £ is close to $1.50 the purchasing power of the dollar locally is far greater. At the local supermarket, which caters for lower income customers, I had a look today and can buy a 4.5lb chicken or 4lb pork loin (rib end) or 2lb minced beef for $5. A dozen eggs are $1.99 and a pack of 8 franks are 79¢. Rice and beans are similarly cheap. Prices for fresh vegetables are a little higher than normal at the moment because nothing local is in season.

A 4.5lb chicken normally lasts us 3 days with the roast, left overs and soup combination. If you are cooking for one and want to make things from scratch most of the packets are too big even when spread over 5 days. A larger group means that you can buy staples in a normal sized packets and still have enough cash for meat and flavorings to perk up the taste.

Good luck to those taking part, I enjoyed the reports from last years challenge and will look out for them over the next week.

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Happy

There is an error in the spreadsheet

In cell E23, to be precise.

Yes, I'm bored. Why do you ask?

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Re: There is an error in the spreadsheet

No error in E23 - 300g of a 500g pack is 0.6!

Besides, the plan has moved on from there...

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Re: There is an error in the spreadsheet

Using hidden columns is cheating! ;-)

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Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

50 pound bags of rice & beans and other dry goods for ~US$20. Go in on the cost with your neighbors if you think it'll go off before you can get around to eating it.

https://www.smartfoodservice.com/

Learn to bake bread. It's not exactly rocket science. My standard 1 kilo loaf costs roughly US$0.65 per loaf. Including heat, not including time. (My yeast & lactobacillus is wild-caught sourdough, from the old mining town of Columbia, California).

The herb garden I put in for MeDearOldMum 45 years ago is still alive & producing flavo(u)r. As is my own, started roughly 20 years ago.

Grow some veg. It's easy. People have been doing it for over 10,000 years.

I have enough space to grow my own animal protein (Eggs, milk, chicken, beef, pork, lamb, etc.). Not everybody has that option ... but I also have roughly 100 pounds of road-kill venison, turkey and wild boar in my meat locker. Make friends with your local sheriff, ask to be called in to remove road-kill, and learn how to butcher meat.

I doubt our food costs here are US$0.75/day/person for the wife & I, the foreman & his wife, and our four main field hands. Including fuel, critter feed & fertilizer.

I do admit to spending money at WholeSpice and SavorySpiceShop.

www.wholespice.com

www.savoryspiceshop.com

Proper pepper does not come pre-ground ... but proper spices cost pennies per day, if you know what you are doing.

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Holmes

Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

I have enough space to grow my own animal protein... ...Not everybody has that option

No shit, Sherlock! Have you seen UK's population density? 663 people per square mile!!!

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Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

I return the "no shit, Sherlock!", and remind you of the "but" option after the ellipsis. Please, do try to read for content.

As for 663 people per square mile ... It's not my fault that you lot have overpopulated your insular little island, to the point where you can't actually feed your own population. Sad, that.

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Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

An insular island.

Jake, the master of tautology.

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Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

One is a geological/spacial formation.

The other is an attitude (usually the second dictionary definition).

English is a precise language, when used precisely.

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Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

A Septic calling the UK insular?

And I thought they didn't do irony!

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@AC(whenever[1]) (was:Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.)

If you think that the melting pot that is the US is insular on a human level, you have clearly never been here. Yes, there are puddles of gunk scattered about that are embarrassing ... but that's not really how most of us actually think. Our biggest problem is that not enough people get off their asses and vote.

[1] Would you PLEASE fix the b0rken time-stamp, ElReg?

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Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

While Jake has admirable self sufficiency (though I am very quietly tip-toeing backwards from the roadkill butchery) I think his situation sounds to me to be far different from those whose plight this is highlighting.

It may well be possible to grow your own meat and veg and purchase the rest of your food needs wholesale - presuming you have enough land and a vehicle to pick up the wholesale goods etc. People who have farms or smallholdings in the 'Western World' rarely struggle for enough to eat. I imagine though that those in the world who have to feed themselves on a pound a day probably don't have those things. Or if they did they'd perhaps want to sell up and use some of the money for food.

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Re: Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.

Overpopulation is not the problem. Progress is, and it's not really a problem as such. If we all grew our own food there probably wouldn't be an online shop where you can buy nice spices. Neither would there be this commentards' section to exchange our views across the Atlantic and further.

jake, I admire your self-sustaining ability but a lot of people cannot or do not want to do the same. Of course, I could give up my job where I spend about nine hours in the office and another three commuting each day, save some time, earn less and grow my own food.

You mentioned Britain, but while the USoA might be able to feed themselves if they wanted, I'm pretty sure they couldn't without quite some imports, e.g. crude oil, while sustaining the current standard of living. Is it really that desirable to be able to feed the own population, to be self-sustained?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: @AC(whenever[1]) (was:Find a restraunt supply store open to the general public.)

Oh, I've been to the good ol' US of A quite a lot, jake, and often had to explain where the rest of the world is located.

And you, obviously, haven't been to the UK in quite a while. If you think the US is a "melting pot", you should try walking down the street in any UK city. You will see it is positively boiling over with different cultures.

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Bacon

You could of course buy the 500g of cooking bacon from T***o for 89p. A bit of a root around finds a back with decent(ish) rashers. It is not the best bacon but it is less than a £ a lb and for cooking it is fine.

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Nice one!

I skipped a takeaway tonight and popped the tenner in your tin. Been doing a lot of soul searching lately, this sort of thing is good to read.

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Re: Nice one!

Good man. Thanks for your support. I could go a takeaway right now, but will have to hold out for a simple bacon sarnie tomorrow morning.

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