back to article Brazilian president signs internet civil rights law

A bill guaranteeing civil rights on the internet was signed into law by Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff at the NetMundial Internet Governance conference today. Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff signs Marco Civil at the NetMundial conference in Brazil, 23 April 2014 In a theatrical flourish, Rousseff signed the "Marco Civil …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Bronze badge
Trollface

"From the country that gave you"...

...Favelas, Police Death Squads and Nuts...

3
15
Anonymous Coward

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

Instead of "from the country that gave you SUVs, wars and Kardashians"?

Or instead of "from the country that gave you burkas, guerrillas and sand?"

"Sneers, 35-hours-work-weeks and cheese?"

"Koalas, kangaroos and deadly spiders"?

What was your point? No country is perfect. Let's hope this really works and other countries decide on joining the idea.

26
1
Silver badge
Big Brother

"Let's hope this really works and other countries decide on joining the idea."

And what good would that do if the USA keeps braking the law ?

14
2
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

Dear A.C,

Brazil should be prioritising and sorting out its Real-World problems rather than its Virtual ones.

2
14
Silver badge

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

"Brazil should be prioritising and sorting out its Real-World problems rather than its Virtual ones."

So should:

The USA, UK, Rusia, China, France...

Your point?

20
1

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

> So should:

The USA, UK, Rusia, China, France...

Your point?

USA, UK, Russia, China, France are not signing this agreement, that is the point. It is a nice gesture, one that I wish could be enforced, but it is akin to signing a policy that politicians will not lie and bankers will not steal.

2
5
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

So, Mr A.C and Mr Godfrey seem to think that a publicity stunt is more important than poverty? And i thought i was shallow!

2
10
Anonymous Coward

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

Your first argument had nothing to do with poverty -- please read it again. And nobody said that it was "more important". Poor is the country where there is only one priority and everything else must wait until their government solves that (often impossible) task before spending just a little time with anything else. Is that what you're advocating?

Small steps, even symbolic, in a more-or-less right or just direction are important. If you believe that Brazil is all about favelas and death squads, sorry about that, but then we agree -- you *are* shallow. But we *may* agree on the extravagant costs of the World Cup.

11
1
Gold badge

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

Okay, let's turn your logic around: the USA and the UK need to sort out their shit before spying on the rest of the world and trying to get other nations to do their bidding by force. They have poverty, corruption and out of control public debt just as a start. After that we could look at the education issues, what with a significant % of the country badly misinformed about proper science and critical thinking and a huge % of both countries still believing that a theocracy is a grand idea, so long as it's their religion that is in charge.

Every country has problems. Two of the biggest bullies on the international scene are the USA and the UK, both of which have umpteen problems of their very own. Brazil is, in this case, doing something good for a goddamned change, and I daresay they are actually ahead of the almighty anglo-american power bloc on civil liberties here, which just goes to further illustrate that both of those countries have lost the moral authority to be telling others what to do.

The world is moving on without you, and now developing nations are starting to slowly get their shit together and even becoming the defenders of liberty you claim to be, bu aren't. Get used to it. The anlgo-american moral hegemony is done.

And good fucking riddance.

14
3
Anonymous Coward

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

Well, we should be working. Or sleeping. Or writing poems. Or feeding kitties. Or teaching in a community college. Or drinking coffee. Or beer. Or volunteering to some noble cause. Or scratching our balls (I scratch mine, you scratch yours). Or reading more and writing less. All that rather than trolling the forum.

Please sort accordingly to your priorities.

4
0
Facepalm

Re: "if the USA keeps braking the law ?"

Then things would move at a snail's pace through our legal system.

Oh, wait, they already do...

1
0
Bronze badge
Black Helicopters

It might help the Venezuelans

Something of the kind would prove what is going on there is due to criminals from the CIA. Especially if everyone had access to the internet. That is probably the greatest drawback their government faces. Someone is already cutting off the power in all the large cities.

That and some Snowden masks should help. Where can I get one?

0
2

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

Yup ...

Remember how we gave up the space race as a species so we could work on 3rd world poverty? That ended well didn't it. It was an argument I heard again and again as a kid. We shouldn't be going to the moon etc when people are starving down here on earth.

~40 years on we still have poverty, war disease and no damned Moon/Mars base.

Dammit where is my fly car and get off my lawn :)

8
1

Re: "From the country that gave you"...

Meanwhile, in the land of the free

http://www.theverge.com/2014/4/9/5597074/inside-comcasts-shaky-fcc-defense-of-time-warner-cable-takeover

TL/DR - Comcast is trying to buy the internet...

0
0
Silver badge
Happy

Re: i like crisps Re: "From the country that gave you"...

"...Favelas, Police Death Squads and Nuts..." And the hilarious Mensalao corruption scandal, a truly ironic case of the Left losing all their vaunted morals the minute they get into power. But it's not like Dimwit Rousseff was a part of it, right? No, she was just the Minister for Energy in the government in charge, and a member (now leader) of the "Workers Party" that was at the root of the corruption. And I'm sure her position as Minister of Energy meant she had no insight into the dodgy dealings involved in energy companies like Petrobas. And she wasn't herself actually involved in any of the dodgy business dealings, right? No, she was just a board member for one of the biggest companies involved in the corruption scandal, Petrobas. No, we can all rest assured that Dilma Rousseff is an unparalleled paragon of political truth, unstinting in her quest for an end to political corruption in Brazil, and her rage at her coms being tapped was purely righteous indignation and nothing to do with her fear of possible evidence of her being involved in corruption. Now, has anyone seen my unicorn, it's got my box of hens' teeth?

1
0
Bronze badge

Re: i like crisps "From the country that gave you"...

My wife happens to be from Brazil, and often tells me how corrupt it is.

Then we were watching the news a few weeks ago, and the Royal Mail sale was in the headlines. So, the government decides to sell the RM, and goes to some banks to get a valuation. And they pull one out of their backsides, which the government accepts. They also negotiate a huge tranche of the shares at that price, with a gentlemen's agreement not to sell them immediately. And then the shares go on sale and promptly double in price. And the banks sell immediately.

And then of course, David Cameron, Vince Cable and all the others responsible for gifting the banks billions will one day lose their jobs, and then promptly walk into absurdly highly paid consultancy jobs (half hour a week, few million a year) with the banks whose pockets they filled.

And my wife's response? If this was Brazil, they'd NEVER get away with that.

Our politicians are just far better at making deceit and criminality look like incompetence.

1
1
Bronze badge
Meh

NETmundial: unclear

" it is unclear if anything substantive will end up in the meeting's final document."

How true, although the organizers took it upon themselves to write the conclusions in advance. Slogans, not substance.

2
1

Going, Going, Gone?

"Any data collection or treatment should only be carried out with full agreement of the parties involved"

Agreement and *understanding* of the Ts&Cs? How long before the biggest serial privacy abusers (FesseBook, Goggle, et al) announce they are no longer doing business in Brazil - or get caught should the law actually get enforced?

2
1
Bronze badge

Re: Going, Going, Gone?

"How long before the biggest serial privacy abusers (FesseBook, Goggle, et al) announce they are no longer doing business in Brazil"

How the hell can that possibly be a bad thing?

3
0
Silver badge

Re: Going, Going, Gone?

> "Any data collection or treatment should only be carried out with full agreement of the parties involved"

How much do you want to bet she's lying?

I bet the Brazilian police like to monitor suspected criminals' email and other digital detritus just as much as other countries do. I'd be surprised if the the Brazilians don't ever spy on any other countries, even if they don't do it to the same extent as the NSA/GCHQ its probably not due to a lack of ambition.

Can't see any government on the planet signing up to that statement, at least not without their fingers firmly crossed behind their backs.

3
0

A couple points that could have been mentioned

Brazillian reader here. I think there are two more things people should know about this bill, besides what's already in the article.

The first is that there is a clause that says the government now has the power to remove from the internet anything that they find to go against "national interests". That is a very vague clause and is basically a way for the government to censor whatever it doesn't like.

It works like this: suppose Alice posts something about how she does not like the way federal government is handling a program or its expenditures. Government issues a note to the host (like Facebook, Google, Wordpress etc.) "asking" for the content to be removed, and possibly the user banned. If the host does not comply within seven days, then all brazillian ISP's must block that host .

The other thing is that by our constituion, no one has the right to anonimity. Freedom of speech is a constitutional right, but you only have it as long as you identify yourself. Every brazillian host, virtual store or service provider of any kind that is located or providing services in Brazil MUST be able to provide the government with at least its users full name, email address, living address, identity number and "physical person register" (something akin to a social security number), within a "reasonable timeframe" whenever requested. Otherwise they may suffer legal sanctions. The user who posts anything that the government finds against "national interest", should they post anonymously and then later be identified, may face a lawsuit or even jail.

But wait, now we have a written promise that privacy will be protected and equality will be preserved! Go freedom, right?

3
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums