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back to article New HDS array: It's a G1000 Jim, but not as we know it*

HDS has updated its 2010 vintage high-end VSP array with the VSP G1000 and a new operating system, together providing the "highest performance and most available unified storage system in the industry," and claiming it's "the most reliable hardware on the planet." There are three mainstream high-end enterprise arrays; EMC's VMAX …

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Anonymous Coward

"There are three mainstream high-end enterprise arrays; EMC's VMAX, HDS' VSP, and IBM's DS8000"

I wouldn't exactly class IBM as mainstream these days. They are a dying boat anchor vendor:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/technology/as-ibm-disappoints-ceo-rometty-feels-the-heat/story-e6frgakx-1226887679548#

When their midrange business started being eaten alive by Wintel, instead of leveraging that ecosystem they tried to counter it with investments in Linux - which has been a massive fail for them. No one wants to keep the UNIX type Dev Ops legacy complexity that was part of the boat anchor model when given the chance to move away to a lower TCO, more modern and less complex world.

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Anonymous Coward

You wouldn't, but every bank, government, utility, etc would.

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Silver badge

Lots of smartphones had hardware keyboards

Of course the good ones had essential keys like the escape key. It's a rather smart idea since you can but the buttons a lot closer together than you could do with an on-screen keyboard while still keeping it usable, plus you don't waste half your screen for the keyboard.

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Re: Lots of smartphones had hardware keyboards

I agreed with you up until "plus you don't waste half your screen for the keyboard". Yes you do. You use up space on the phone that could otherwise be used for a screen, and permanently instead of only when you *need* a keyboard.

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WTF?

Acronyms much?

I've read this and have only a limited clue what the content is about, this despite having implemented some of the acronyms used in the story. May I suggest a summary paragraph for the less technical?

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Anonymous Coward

100 per cent data availability ?

"It has a 100 per cent data availability guarantee."

This is a bold claim... The big iron storage units obviously build a lot of redundancy in, and clearly strive for this goal, but this gives no leeway for failure, unlike a n 9's statement that is largely not provable either way...

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Gold badge

Re: 100 per cent data availability ?

Sure it is. Shoot it. Does it still work? If not, I heartily disagree with the claim. I deploy storage to my SMBs where I can pick any arbitrary storage node and shoot it with the array still working. If the thing can't even survive that test...

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Bronze badge

Re: 100 per cent data availability ?

last I recall the HDS guarantee was 100% protected against data loss with the array causing the loss of data. Maybe HDS expanded it further but they can't really guarantee 100% data availability all it takes is a simple power outage(of all circuits) to take the system(s) down. But they can protect you against permanent data loss due to software bugs or faulty hardware.

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J.T

Re: 100 per cent data availability ?

It means if you lose data because of a hardware failure they'll write you a fairly large check. They're not saying it can't fail, they're saying they are willing to back up their reliability with a checkbook.

And they already had that with the VSP.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 100 per cent data availability ?

Well you could shoot the old one.

http://h20621.www2.hp.com/video-gallery/us/en/4771fb6e6ae03e45534d08bfbe17cade6656025b/r/video

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Gold badge

Re: 100 per cent data availability ?

With a list of caveats that lasts longer than the movie itself. I'm somewhat less than enthused, though willing to give it the old unit the benefit of the doubt. Now about the new unit...

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Non-disruptive microcode upgrades are completed without affecting application quality of service

HDS have been do that for a while... back in 2000 HDS delivered a new array where I was working; I asked them to do a FW upgrade while we ran a test load on the data warehouse that it was backing.

Damn thing didn't miss a beat. I realise it's pretty much par for the course these days. But I do like the HDS kit; calm, steady, reliable is what you want in back-end storage

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Anonymous Coward

So what?

This all sounds well and good but some details seem to be omitted such as what granularity is offered with the auto tiering? Sounds expensive too.

"This latter item provides "multi-system and multi-datacenter active-active capabilities without the need for an appliance." Generally, HDS says, an appliance like EMC's VPLEX is needed to provide failover between high-end enterprise systems in a data centre and between data centres."

Or a Dell Compellent which offers this natively with Live Volume.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: So what?

Why compare only a single relatively minor feature such as tiering, you need to look at the whole package and live volume as a feature doesn't even pretend to be in the same class. Sounds expensive, so ask for the same performance and data availability guarantee from EMC or Dell and see how expensive they become.

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