back to article FCC doubles 5GHz spectrum in prep for one-gigabit Wi-Fi

In a rare bit of bipartisanship, the Republican and Democratic commissioners of the US Federal Communications Commission have unanimously voted to loosen the rules governing the operation of Wi-Fi devices operating in the 5GHz band. "The new rules will make 100MHz of spectrum more accessible for use in homes and congested spaces …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Anonymous Coward

With 80Mhz bonding in 802.11ac already in play and 160Mhz optionally in Wave 1. Wave 2 will bring 160Mhz capability. Of course that won't really work under the previous spectrum as then you only have enough spectrum to two channels. Eve with the 100Mhz added and if another 195Mhz was added, the channels are still limited. The real gain will be in just using 80Mhz channels but for home use, 40Mhz is really all that is required. 802.11ac makes sense for people that have 300Mbps or more for Internet connectivity though which is where I fall, but even then, I really have to try to reach 300Mbps. Even if four TV's were streaming from Netflix/Amazon/etc. and downloads going on, 300Mbps is hard to achieve.

More spectrum is nice though as the 5GHz band starts to see more use.

1
0
Bronze badge

Re:

From what I can see the changes aren't quite as limited as you indicate.

From what I can determine these changes now enable the use of channels: 34, 38, 42 & 46; removing a number of holes in the existing spectrum (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels#5.C2.A0GHz_.28802.11a.2Fh.2Fj.2Fn.2Fac.29.5B16.5D ), so permitting channel bonding in this band.

0
0
Silver badge
Headmaster

I'm not sure what to make of that analogy.

While peanut butter and jelly are, at least in America, regarded as a good combination, oil and vinegar are also known as a simple but tasty salad dressing. Adding to the confusion, oil and vinegar usually are mixed when applied to food, though they don't stay that way, while peanut butter and jelly are placed in contact with one another, but with no effort to mix them. All I can conclude from this simile with certainty, is that the spectrum is more viscus than previously thought.

8
0
Silver badge

Re: I'm not sure what to make of that analogy.

At least he didn't suggest coffee and Tim Tams. While the Tim Tam Slam produces excellent results when implemented correctly, it can be tricky to get right and may result in a very significant failure, including browning of the trousers! As we all know, telecommunications implementations can easily tend towards the messy.

0
0
Silver badge

Re: I'm not sure what to make of that analogy.

I have never understood what the attraction is of peanut butter and jelly.

I like peanut butter (both crunchy and smooth) and I like jams (jelly? wtf is that about) including grape, but I cannot imagine putting them together in a sandwich, it's just wrong...

2
0

Re: I'm not sure what to make of that analogy.

Peanut butter and Marmite is the way to go.

0
1
Anonymous Coward

Re: I'm not sure what to make of that analogy.

"Peanut butter and Marmite is the way to go." Rubbish, peanut butter and brown sauce is THE sandwich filling of choice when using peanuts.

0
0

Re: I'm not sure what to make of that analogy.

Maybe, but bacon and brown sauce trumps all.

1
0
Silver badge

Re: peanut butter and jelly

Bacon and tomato sauce surely!

0
1
Bronze badge

Re: peanut butter and jelly

I can stomach either tomato or brown sauce, but not if you are going to call me Shirley.

1
0
Silver badge

Euro-law?

How does this compare with the European allocation? If they don't match there are going to be issues - hardware is made for a global market now, and with a lot of things being imported by retailers the 'euro-firmware-US-firmware' approach is already unreliable enough. I can imagine Europeans taking their phones to the US and finding they don't connect to some access points, because their phone firmware is configured not to use those 'license only' bands.

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: Euro-law?

I guess a lot of hardware can take a regulatory compliance overlay. The percentage of deviation for a few hundred megs at 5GHz is small so most of the RF side will be capable it's just down to where it's told to go. I have used Ubiquiti hardware and that allows the user to tweak quite a bit or to keep the EIRP compliance checked after selecting the country and antenna to have the device apply the channel and RF limits automatically

(to be honest I've never tried to see where it goes "disabled" but the scan option at least covers a wide frequency range)

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: Euro-law?

>How does this compare with the European allocation?

See table: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels#5.C2.A0GHz_.28802.11a.2Fh.2Fj.2Fn.2Fac.29.5B16.5D

So it would seem that US infrastructure devices will be able to make better use of bonded channels than the EU and won't be restricted to indoor use only in the 5.150-5.350GHz band.

As for mismatches between infrastructure (access points) and client devices; with WiFi the client typically takes it's lead from the infrastructure ie. assume the infrastructure is using a legitimate channel, so the potential for mismatch is very similar to that experienced today.

0
0
Happy

FCC sez: All Your Hertz Are Belong to US

Somebody set up US Da Bomb.

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: FCC sez: All Your Hertz Are Belong to US

What you say?

0
0

Wonder if this can be used to give decent broadband in rural areas.

Transmitter in each village, fed by the green infinity cabinet fibre link.

Receiver on the roof a few km away.

0
0
Silver badge

There are ALREADY Rural Fixed wireless using LICENSED spectrum. Using licence free WiFi spectrum for outdoor FWALA (Fixed Wireless) proved to be a disaster 6 years ago. Real commercial WISPs (Wireless ISPs) all changed to licensed spectrum years ago.

The problem is that Mobile Data is subsidised by voice and mis-sold as broadband. Hence there is now little investment in real Fixed Wireless Broadband. It's not a lack of Spectrum or Technology.

Also 5GHz band is really only line of sight. If you are going to be limited to LOS there is cheap good gear at licensed 10GHz band, much more capacity. Or if you need better outdoor coverage there is licensed 3.5GHz band which is much better than 5GHz.

0
0
Silver badge

Grey imports

Have they checked what everyone else is already doing with that band?

Once China starts producing the WiFi Airpoints and Routers and Dongles we'll be flooded with the gear in Europe. No-one sensibly polices CE mark

0
0
FAIL

Freeing up 195MHz in the 5MHz band? I don't think so.

So I can use anything from 97.5MHz down to -97.5MHz? That negative lower bound should prove interesting....

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums