back to article Interview: Cisco's security supremo on the Internet of Everything

Among his many responsibilities, Chris Young is the Cisco executive charged with leading its security challenge. Last week at Cisco Live! Australia, Vulture South talked to Young about securing the Internet of Everything. El Reg:Cisco has put a $19 trillion value on the Internet of Things: how do we stop it becoming a $19 …

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Base Camp One on Everest?

With IoT we don't even know which mountain we're climbing, let lone which camp we're at.

All the network bods and the people trying to sell components etc. All the buzz on IoT is from vendors pushing solutions. Unfortunately the problem has not really been identified yet and there's no real value in it.

Sure, there is value in a whole lot more sensors monitoring traffic, weather, and other real time data but that is only a tiny fraction of what the IoT industry is pushing.

Where is the value in your washing machine having a network connection? Is it going to tweet its mates about how many undies it washed this week?

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Re: Base Camp One on Everest?

"Where is the value in your washing machine having a network connection? Is it going to tweet its mates about how many undies it washed this week?"

Of course not, but it will automatically update your Facebook page with that information.

Seriously, with a connected washing machine, you could expect an e-mail from the health authorities saying that they noticed you have done less loads of underwear this month than last, and that they're concerned about that.

Worse, the manufacturer could lock the machine because they don't believe it is safe to operate it after the warranty runs out. Could we be moving to "hardware as a service"? Anything is possible.

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Re: Base Camp One on Everest?

When someone talks about the IoT being kettles, fridges, washing machines or toasters, it helps to stick your fingers in your ears. On the other hand, if someone starts talking about internet connected sensors attached to major infrastructure helping to simultaneously improve services and reduce costs, you might be able to see some value in it.

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Anonymous Coward

Wow.

Finally someone looking for hoopholes in the Net.

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Typical behavior (or behaviour, if you like)

Seems that the "business model" will drive this. So one had to look at where's the costs and where's the profit. There's no profit in updates or even good security. It's probably assumed that everyone's toaster will end up on a botnet.

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I gave up after the first two questions and 'answers'

Did I misread the article or did the first two questions not actually get answered?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: I gave up after the first two questions and 'answers'

I tried to power through it beyond the first page, but the amount of non-sense this guy spouts makes it hard to actually figure out what he wants to achieve.

Meh, this seems to align pretty much with the amount of puff pieces/pro Cisco articles I've been seeing lately on El Reg. I wonder if the tiny disclaimer at the end had anything to do with that.

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Anonymous Coward

tried to power through it beyond the first page

I didn't even get that far, too much marketing buzzword bullshit for me.

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Whatever the problem is

Sticking an £350 (minimum) Cisco security product in front of a 150p appliance is not the answer you were looking for.

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I am afraid

Just like it is an unnecessary risk to use a Target credit card, it is too risky to have your stuff connected online. Even if people do not steal or ruin your possessions, accidents can happen. Use the on/off switch instead.

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Given the track record of Cisco when it comes to securing their own products...

... this does seem like a blind person talking about colours.

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Anonymous Coward

What a Tit! Welcome to commodity/OS networking. You will have to fund your skiing trips/daughters private education from something else FuckTard!

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Anonymous Coward

This Cisco dude...

...really didn't say anything. I could have speculated more interestingly. Even then, the speculation will not be what happens. The IoT will come to you. At first you will have to connect everything up. After a couple generations of devices, they will connect automatically. You'll have to tamper will all electronics to disable their networking abilities. Many will not run without calling home. We are watching you for we are many.

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Stop

Re: This Cisco dude...

Agree - as consumers / users of home equipment we will effectively be forced in to joining and using the IoT.

You will find you have to connect your fridge, cooker, lights to get them to work at all - they just won't function without a connection to your "smart" meter. You'll have to agree to get a reasonable deal on your power bills, and the "reasonable" deal will mean your power company can switch off your applainces / heaters etc when they like. Washing, heating or toast on demand will be the preserve of the rich.

The appliance manufacturers will work out they can make money by making their warrantees more restrictive, conditional on them being able to monitor your use of your cooker, washing machine etc.

Just like your iPhone has a water sensor to see if it's been down the WC, the washing machine will have a load sensor to see if you put too many y-fronts in at once, the oven will know if you left the grill on overnight too many times after a session and grass you up, the toaster will record if you were a bit heavy handed - sorry mate, no guarantee any more, no refund when it craps out.

The excuse will be it's for your benefit, saving you money, when really it will be about allowing power companies and appliance manufacturers keep their profits going up at your expense.

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