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back to article Intel reinvents the PC as giant 'Black Brook' fondleslab

Intel has shown off its vision for the next generation of PCs, in the form of “Black Brook”, a reference design for a “desktop all-in-one” computer. The new class of device is a PC built into a touch-screen that appears to be up to about 20 inches on its diagonal dimension, packs a battery and nestles into a docking station. …

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Facepalm

That is so funny...

The only thing missing was the bit at the end when a kid drops it and mum & dad go ballistic.

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Eight cores looks interesting

...but the Black Brook demonstration makes me wonder why the people in the video weren't just using something cheaper and lighter like a 2560 x 1600 resolution Nexus 10 (AU$469).

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LDS
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Re: Eight cores looks interesting

Because it's so slooooooooooooooooow and limited compared to an Intel Extreme CPU and an high-end nVidia card....

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Meanwhile, the prices for huge 4K screens are plummeting...

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It's quite funny watching the actors carefully passing the demonstration object to each other.

I do suspect we're going to get connected screens on a range of devices as prices come down for embedding them - adding an electronic recipe book to a kitchen work surface for example - you certainly won't be lugging something big and heavy and not waterproof really doesn't appeal. Having screens in situ would mirror existing patterns of having radios around the place or more recently wifi connected sound systems. Intel will only be part of this if it is prepared to sell the components for a couple of cents.

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LDS
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All-in-ones are not for the desktop power user.

Intel fails to understand the all-in-one are not for the desktop power user - they are good for receptions and secretaries, lthough it could be delireved to some unlucky boys and girls whose parents can't understand what PC they should buy, and get that because it looks simple and fashionable.

The desktop power user is much more interested in the 4th generation eight core Extreme CPU - to put into his custom-built PC together some other high-end hardware choosen for the tasks desired - be them gaming, media production/editing, 3D modelling, etc.

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Re: All-in-ones are not for the desktop power user.

Also, AIO's are good for families where parents want to keep track of what the kids are doing on the computer.

The main advantage of AIO's is that they are essentially big-screen laptops and thus almost silent, which is nice.

Power isn't an issue in these scenarios, though I suspect it won't be long before we discover its ok to use an ARM chip for most of the time, rather than intel.

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LDS
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Re: All-in-ones are not for the desktop power user.

It's not the form factor that makes easier to control what somebody is doing on a PC - that's a software and configuration issue + parental presence and education.

If you want you children just to look at the Internet and play silly games and ARM chip is OK. If you want to teach them how to take advantage of a computer power it isn't. I'd also encourage them to look what's inside to understand how a computer is built and work - and thereby what tech specs mean.

Anyway I guess most home "non power" users are most interested in tablets/laptops than in all-in-ones (business users where a stylish, non cables cluttered silent desktop makes sense are another category). Power user prefer to select each component they need, from the monitor to the CPU cooler and fans - BTW, my liquid-cooled Intel Extreme is very silent when running at low load, even the digital power unit can turn its fan off when not needed. Noise - of lack of - it's a matter of components quality, non form factor. Smaller form factors may be even noisier when load is high, because they need to cool components much closer to each other and without being able to dissipate heat through passive technologies.

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Meh

One happy familty....

Yes, agreed, it is funny.

No squabbling over who's busy with the device and I see that this happy family don't even save their photo edits or exit the program when handing this oversized fondleslab over to the next person who's waiting impatiently to use it

Watching it being carried, it looks a little cumbersome, so I too would anticipate these being dropped by clumsy family members or by the younger offspring.

Looking to my right, my wok colleague has an MSI 21" touch screen Windows 7 all-in-one type thing.

The only things missing on my colleague's touchy AIO are a battery and Windows 8.1, but in essence the reinvented Intel offering isn't that far off what's already been available for quite some time.

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Facepalm

Some design suggestions

Ditch the glass - make it plastic with anti-scratch coating.

And use flexible display tech. That way *when* the kid drops it there is a fair chance it won't break.

Oh, and make it smaller so it is easier to move.

And add 3G or 4G connectivity.

Hang on... isn't that a phablet?

I think, to me, the draw of a desktop is the ability to access and upgrade the components. Not sure what Intel are thinking. Perhaps they aren't. It could be a case of:

<BandWagon><Intel mood="desperate"><Jump timing="late"/></Intel></BandWagon>

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unintended humour

Portable, like walking around the house with a smallish flatscreen tv under your arm.

And what's with the 20th Anniversary of Pentium ?

The whole project says desperation.

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Re: unintended humour

Like the luggable TVs and monitors of old: See it is potable, it's got a handle and everything.

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Re: unintended humour

Not so long ago most people had tellies smaller than this. All that's missing is the trolley.

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Re: unintended humour

How does having a handle make it suitable for drinking?

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Re: unintended humour

Have you tried drinking out of non-handled mugs? By the time you can pick it up, your tea is cold.

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Anonymous Coward

all-in-one

buy one, upgrade none

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Anonymous Coward

cheese

on the screen.

ok folks, but who cares about what the nerds (the register audience) think. Question is: will the Average Family swallow?

btw, why limit this tablet to 27 inch? Add some wheels, and you can go to 50 inch, no problem....

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Re: cheese

Hi Dad, can I borrow the PC? I'll have push it up the hill to Jimmy's house...

What a wonderful mental image.

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Water damage in 3,2,1

Oh yes - lets put our incredibly expensive gadget in the middle of the table, surround it with glasses of water and play a game that has four people reaching across said table.

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Trollface

Re: Water damage in 3,2,1

Well earlier, someone said it was potable...

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Re: Water damage in 3,2,1

Oi, leave me alone! I only missed a lettr!

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WTF?

Huh!

Where on earth did they come up with the name Black Brook? Surely everyone is going to call it Black Book or is that the idea. Or is it an amalgam of big overblown brick.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Huh!

As a former Intel employee, I can inform you that the Big i name all their products after rivers, mountains and other all American heritage names,

This came about from their multi-processor Pentium Pro box in the mid 90's which they named "Pocahontas" and this landed them into a legal squabble with Disney Studios. (It was settled amicably)

Thereafter we've seen some weird and wonderful names accompanying Intel products.

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Anonymous Coward

HP already have all-in-one

I nearly bought it for my partner as she wanted to be able to carry it downstairs and draw in the living room whilst the TV was on. It has a battery, so it doesn't need to be switched off and the stand folds into the back like a hunking great tablet, the only issue for her was the standard capacitance touch screen, they're not good to draw on with a stylus.

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Re: HP already have all-in-one

There is a small USB Wacom screen you can get. It's not cheep though, it use to start at £800. The pro screens are about 2k last time I checked.

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Re: HP already have all-in-one

I've been lusting for the largest Wacom here myself and yep it's $2000. What I did get, for the interim, is a $169 Acer 20" 10 pt. capacitive multi- touch which is sitting in my lap as I type this. And the observations above have been dead on. Light, battery powered, waterproof, drop-worthy.... Windows 8.1 is actually decent which speaks volumes about how well Microsoft matches OS characteristics to real-world hardware. [Original table-top Surface, Surface 1 & 2 RT/Pro, W8 Desktop & Server, and that's only recently!] My other display is a 30" 2560x1600 True-Color and it's for serious work now. With the 20" you get an on-screen keyboard and touch that doesn't suck especially on the Windows desktop.

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chances of repairing this....

fuck all. more landfill. sigh.

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Tray

Why not use it as a handy tray? To be fair, we do carry our Sony all-in-one around like that and now have bulging arm muscles.

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FAIL

I hate to dismiss a form factory out of hand, but touch just doesn't work on a screen that big. It's fine to use with thumbs on a 4-5 inch smart-phone, its fine to use on a 7-10 inch tablet to browse with on your knee, but to have to swipe your entire arm across a 21" screen sitting on a table - that gets painful very quickly. And that's before we even talk about trying to use the Windows 8 desktop on such a system.

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Anonymous Coward

I'm guessing you haven't used a large touch screen display but like our MPs don't regard ignorance as a reason not to go out of your way to tell people your opinion.

If you ever get a chance to use one, you'll discover touch is useful and convenient for some activities, so although for most purposes its not a replacement for mouse/keyboard touch adds to the versatility of a PC even up to 27/30" monitor size. All the more so if you have applications that are touch aware.

Speaking from experience.

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Experience? Not when it sits in your lap! In bed, 20" full touch and it's awesome. Great on the couch or table-top as well. [Nowhere good as sex though....] Even editing doesn't totally suck now. It's the whole not having to hold your arms up to operate it that makes the difference. Now I'm doing the skull-sweat to make it even more functional as it's still clunky with my sixteen foot active extender cords.

BTW, all of my typing and editing here and above. done on my touch display in my lap.

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AC wrote:

I'm guessing you haven't used a large touch screen display but like our MPs don't regard ignorance as a reason not to go out of your way to tell people your opinion.

You guess wrong, but thanks for hiding behind an AC so we can't see your history of posting such baseless accusations.

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Explains why Asus are dropping dual OS...

My Asus P1801 is a nice precursor to this, Android on the 18.4" tablet (with 5 hour battery life, and it is about that) and Win 8.1 on the base station. Does nicely for the living room PC.

However Asus are now reported as dropping dual OS support - and this kind of move my the Microsoft cartel may help to explain it. If they want the business building the reference platform.

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Re: Explains why Asus are dropping dual OS...

Only half right as Google also dropped the hammer on it. That's okay. I'll just emulate Android on my workstation when required (like testing an app on it) and RDP for Windows on Android. Stupid shit anyway. It's a tiny-tiny niche case and they had to kill it lest we have the best of all possible worlds: any application, any device, anywhere, any time. That's the real fail. Looking like collusion more and more with every passing month.

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