back to article VMware drops vSphere 5.5 Update 1 into sysadmins' laps

VMware has released VSphere 5.5 Update 1, the first big update to its flagship cloud co-ordinator. Some of the update's features were widely known in advance, especially the inclusion of the VSAN virtual SAN right there in the kernel. VSAN's not perfect, however. The “known issues” section of VMware's release notes points out …

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FAIL

Requires Adobe Flash?

Mega Fail!

A management tool that requires a continuing source of security embarrasment (flash) on top of a browser, (another cause of security headaches) on top of Windows.

Collect the whole set!

(Not that Java would be a better option.)

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Re: Requires Adobe Flash?

OK, so no Java and no Flash. Fine, but what would you replace them with? I personally plan to stay away from the vSphere web client as long as possible.

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Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Requires Adobe Flash?

They should have never abandoned the old QT management interface.

And they should return to it.

The .net based one is shit, the flash based one is bloody shit.

I will always fail to understand the fixation with stupid run-times when deploying sophisticated c++ software.

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Wasn't HTML5 supposed to save us by now??

It's always amusing to watch software companies try to shoehorn a rich client interface into a web browser. Every enterprisey management tool I've used that has both options has had a Web client that's a big ball of fail without something like Flash or Java to prop it up. Most usually roll out a web-only client for a version or two, then realize they need some client-side intelligence and use the easiest option available.

I'm not saying it can't be done (Microsoft's Azure portal is actually really nice...for a web client.) But it's rare that you see a web client that's preferred over the desktop version. I've used VSphere's rich and web clients, and unfortunately I still like the Windows client better. With 5.x, unless I use the CLI for everything I really don't have that option anymore if I want to configure anything "new." One of the nice things about a local client is feedback when you're accessing something over a low-speed or high-latency connection -- you can be sure you clicked something rather than thinking "Is that Flash acting up again, or did it actually go through?"

Maybe I'm just old, but I like the responsiveness of a GUI that has at least some local intelligence. HTML5 is a good step in the right direction, but it's amazing how much the traditional GUI application is being stuffed into the confines of a web browser.

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