back to article Does Apple's iOS 7 make you physically SICK? Try swallowing version 7.1

Apple has released its first major update for iOS 7 — version 7.1, natch — which brings "improvements and bug fixes" to iDevices, including better Touch ID fingerprint recognition, the option to further reduce the on-screen animations that sickened some users, and a boost to performance on the iPhone 4. Details of Apple's iOS 7 …

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Just want one fix

It doesn't look as if they have fixed the app refresh problem - https://discussions.apple.com/message/23192445#23192445

Unless the "improved performance on iPhone 4" helps to address it

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Trollface

> Siri also has added what Apple describes as "new, more natural sounding" voices, both male and female, in Mandarin Chinese, UK and Australian English, and Japanese.

Confirms what I always suspected, American is not very "natural sounding".

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Anonymous Coward

A friend from New Zealand used to describe the more extreme versions as sounding like "a buzz saw cutting through wet teak". Evocative, at least.

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Go

"If you want security-upgrade details, you'll need to wait."

You don't need to wait if you subscribe to Apple's Product Security mailing list.

Details at lists.apple.com

These notifications often arrive in my inbox before the App Store lists the update as being available (though an App Store Refresh - Command-R sometimes does the trick).

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Pint

Re: "If you want security-upgrade details, you'll need to wait."

Undoubtedly, another batch of knock-off cables will stop working.

Not funny Apple. I'll wait a few weeks and order more off ebay anyway. So stop being all Microsoft on us, okay?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "If you want security-upgrade details, you'll need to wait."

'All Microsoft'? I dont recall a Windows update screwing up my USB cables.

Sometimes an OS upgrade would break the software it was talking to, but the cable would still work for something else...

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Re: "If you want security-upgrade details, you'll need to wait."

*Cough* Apple started banning non-approved cables after people were seriously injured or had house fires thanks to dodgy charging cables. Are you saying that was a bad idea? Try Amazon Basics cables. They're Apple-approved, and cheaper than Apple's versions.

As for the details, they're at: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT6162 .

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Re: "If you want security-upgrade details, you'll need to wait."

So we're accusing Apple of breaking third-party Lightning cables without any evidence that they have, comparing them to Microsoft despite that not really being something Microsoft would do, then recommending Amazon cables as still working even though we still have no evidence that others have stopped working or, therefore, that Amazon cables still do?

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Anonymous Coward

Better than Android then?

Just asking...

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Re: Better than Android then?

Different to Android. You pays your money and you makes your choice. Getting all partisan about it is just silly.

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Re: Better than Android then?

I have both. Android on the phones, iOS on the tablet. It is hard to make a direct comparison because a tablet's use is not going to be the same as a phone's use. However, with experience in both I would suggest that the above response "different" is the correct one. There are numerous things I like about iOS and numerous things that bug the hell out of me. It's the same for Android, only the things are different.

One thing that is undeniably nice is the stream of updates. The Android system is badly messed up in this respect, which is why my current phone is running 2.3.7. If Sony have made a newer version available, Orange haven't bothered to pick up on it. So I'm stuck with an oldie. Sure, it is easier for Apple given it's their OS on their hardware, but this is an end-user comparison. My iPad Mini is up to date, my phone isn't.

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Re: Better than Android then?

Yes, there's worth-while comfort and convenience in Apple's walled garden, although the slightly dated-looking little iPhones, the inflexibility and the lack of configurable keyboards with far better predictive text (like SwiftKey and Swype) are a cross to bear for some. I can type proper English e-mails faster on my phone with these than I can on the keyboard of my desktop machine!

As for updates, my Nexus 5 phone regularly updates (now running Android 4.4.2) and updating apps is a breeze. My Android pad runs Cyanogenmod and I could update it to nightlies - if I ever got that keen. I don't think you should compare older Android devices with recent Apple ones, as both systems are changing rapidly.

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Re: Better than Android then?

Yes, but only in one sense. Apple doesn't let the carrier screw with the OS - err, I mean "customise" it. And (OK, two senses) updates are not dependant on the carrier releasing a customised version for their phone.

Personally I'm philosophically attracted to the Android ecosystem (and had one for a while) but I'm practically more attracted to the iOS walled garden. I got fed up with O2 being a version behind at least on my Galaxy compared with Samsung. Yes, I know I could have jailbroken it, but why should I need the hassle. I'm 53 you know ...

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Pint

Re: Better than Android then?

Buy your choice of phone and several tablets, a tablet or two of each ecosystem. Duh.

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Re: Better than Android then?

Those who do not like carrier flavours added to their phones should buy from resellers rather than the carriers. Usually cheaper anyway in my experience.

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Re: Better than Android then?

"I can type proper English e-mails faster on my phone with these than I can on the keyboard of my desktop machine!"

Either you're a horrible typist or everything you type is so predictable that you might as well not bother. The world record for typing speed with Swype is 58 WPM. Anybody in technology should be able to type faster on a real keyboard without thinking twice.

Really, this infatuation with Android keyboard customizability baffles me. First of all, why are you typing so much on your PHONE? What's so urgent that it can't wait until you get to a computer with a real keyboard? And second, I have yet to meet anybody who can type faster on their fancy custom Android keyboard than I can on my iPhone, and a fair number of people have tried...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Better than Android then?

If the old Android version bugs you (not surprising as Gingerbread is ancient), why not give cyanogenmod a try? I was reluctant to move away from the comfort of the stock network-provided ROM but my phone is well out of warranty and I had a feeling all the network/manufacturer/Google crapware wasn't helping performance or battery life. Installed 10.2 using the ridiculously easy installer and I'm loving it so far.

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Re: Better than Android then?

"I have yet to meet anybody who can type faster on their fancy custom Android keyboard than I can on my iPhone, and a fair number of people have tried"

I have yet to see anybody who can type faster on any touch screen phone that I can on my old Sony Ericsson P1i's physical keyboard. Unfortunately the phone manufacturers don't make anything with a keyboard like that any more.

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CL Tools update as well

Looks like some of the "goodness" requires an update of the toolchain. Version 5.1 of "Command Line Developer Tools" has also been released.

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So now the keyboard can show bold letters when bold is switched on. How about lowercase letters when caps lock is off and uppercase letters when it's on?

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Dancing keyboard

@karlh

That would be very easy to do. But it would be a mistake, and Apple well know it. For many people, a (fairly) pointless and frequent keyboard layout change would be an irritating distraction. I believe people have tried it on jailbroken devices and rapidly come to the conclusion that it's not a great feature.

I somehow seem to struggle by with my proper physical keyboard and its shift key.

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Sensible keyboard

You might call it a dancing keyboard. I call it a logical keyboard. Android has no trouble in reflecting the state of Caps in the keys themselves. I find it rather disconcerting that the iOS keyboard just stays stuck looking the same.

If this might come as a shock to some, why not - gasp - make it a configurable option?

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Re: Sensible keyboard

Sorry, we'll have to disagree on that. Android's forever-switching keyboard is a gimmick. I think I prefer animated GIFs on websites to that.

Apple don't generally add configuration options of any kind unless there's a very good reason to do so.

If you are disconcerted by not having your beloved 'sensible' keyboard, you'll probably fall over dizzy if you use a regular physical keyboard like I'm typing on now.

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Re: Sensible keyboard

> I find it rather disconcerting that the iOS keyboard just stays stuck looking the same.

The letters on my laptop's keyboard are in caps all the time.

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Re: Dancing keyboard

Not sure I would classify changing the key labels from 'a' to 'A' etc as a layout change.

It's interesting that you compare a physical keyboard. It certainly does sound like a remnant of skeumorphic design.

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Re: Dancing keyboard

Meego has it. It is only useful when typing passwords

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Sensible keyboard

This is a good reason, it's called choice.

I thought the whole point of this amazing, touch screen, non-skeuomorphic age, is that is isn't limited to the physical object in either form or function.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Dancing keyboard

"It's interesting that you compare a physical keyboard. It certainly does sound like a remnant of skeumorphic design."

Hardly. Having the keyboard change around between upper and lower case is bad UI design for two reasons. First, it's needlessly distracting to have a bunch of stuff changing/flashing/blinking if it's not helping the user accomplish the task at hand. (And really, does the keyboard changing actually give you any sort of benefit? Are you really that unaware of whether the next letter you'll type will be in caps or not?) Second, psychologically speaking, it's more cognitive load to be visually familiar with the upper AND lower case keyboards. To be honest, that probably isn't a huge issue, but at the same time, why should it potentially be an issue at all?

This is the sort of stuff you learn in the first few weeks of any UI design class. If Android's stock keyboard does change letters between upper/lower case then I find that startling and depressing. Google has a reputation for hiring people with top qualifications who should really know better.

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Re: Dancing keyboard

The keyboard on my Palm Pilot switches case and has done for many years - not once have I ever considered it anything other than useful. It certainly has never been irritating or even pointless.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Dancing keyboard

"Having the keyboard change around between upper and lower case is bad UI design for two reasons ... This is the sort of stuff you learn in the first few weeks of any UI design class."

Quick check of the on-screen keyboard in Windows 8, and the keys change from lower to upper case displayed, when you engage caps lock, or shift.

Have you got a reference to any UI design class guidelines saying this is bad UI design?

I've found some references saying it isn't. Interested to know where you're getting the idea it is, when so many on-screen keyboards work this way, and have done for as long as I can remember using this kind of thing.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Dancing keyboard

"Have you got a reference to any UI design class guidelines saying this is bad UI design?"

No, just the ones I mentioned. I'm afraid I took all my UI design classes long before the current generation of touchscreen soft keyboards so none of my textbooks would address this case specifically. But I don't see why general principles wouldn't apply. And I would suggest that "Windows 8 does it" is not necessarily the best justification for a UI design decision.

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FAIL

Re: Dancing keyboard

"I'm afraid I took all my UI design classes long before the current generation of touchscreen soft keyboards so none of my textbooks would address this case specifically."

I see. So you are taking a UI design principle that you know is outdated and are trying to apply it to a modern UI because it supports what may be the only on-screen keyboard UI element that behaves in this manner?

Next you'll be telling me that underlining incorrectly spelled words is a known terrible UI decision (...because somebody will have to come along later with an eraser and rub out all the underlines).

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Anonymous Coward

10,000 unread messages?

"10,000 unread messages on their iPhone or iPad, the bug is not to be charged to iOS"

This suggests a dead fanboi.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 10,000 unread messages?

Nah. I know plenty of people who subscribe to various email lists for work where emails are sent out by automated processes several times per day. They can check these emails (or usually just read the subjects) to see that everything is going okay, but more commonly don't, and let the emails pile up. Do that for a few months or years and you can very easily have tens of thousands of unread emails.

Just because the Mail app says you have 10k unread emails doesn't mean it has downloaded them all to the device. Local storage is not necessarily being wasted.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 10,000 unread messages?

Yes, that's me, I have 43,000 'unread' mails. I look upon it as useful traffic dilution for GCHQ/NSA/JTRIG and hope they enjoy reading them perhaps before I do!

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Joke

Re: 10,000 unread messages?

But what if one of them is a crisis that really needs your attention? How is GCHQ supposed to alert you to it, if you're not checking your messages?

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The reason for this is that there is no way to delete all your emails en masse which in this day and age is ridiculous.

I'm also surprised it fixes an iOS crashing bug .... I've not had Android crash on me for god knows how long now, at least Galaxy S1 days!

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"The reason for this is that there is no way to delete all your emails en masse which in this day and age is ridiculous."

It would be nice if there was an obvious way to archive (onto a PC) all of your sent mail and delete it from the iPad. Is this hiding somewhere in iTunes?

As to the message selection, it seems strange that "Mark all" doesn't have a "Select all" option...

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re: I've not had Android crash on me for god knows how long now

My Android phone just rebooted itself in the middle of a tune on the way to work this morning.

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Anonymous Coward

"It would be nice if there was an obvious way to archive (onto a PC) all of your sent mail and delete it from the iPad. Is this hiding somewhere in iTunes?"

Don't know what email service you're using, but if you send an email via GMail then it gets saved ("archived") in your Sent folder. By default iOS only keeps the most recent 50 (?) emails in any given folder so there's absolutely no need to delete anything.

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Anonymous Coward

Mail services...

Y! Mail and iCloud do this too.

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Not quite right...

"By default iOS only keeps the most recent 50 (?) emails in any given folder so there's absolutely no need to delete anything."

Personal, private, POP3 mailbox. Sent folder held on iPad.

Currently 0 unread messages.

Open private mail, "Sent" folder. Tap "Edit", then "Mark all", then "Mark as unread".

152 unread messages.

You were saying?

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Anonymous Coward

Apple writes crap software, we know that's true.

- Jacob Appelbaum

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Context, AC, context. Appelbaum was talking about an NSA tool for compromising iPhones, and his suspicions that Apple were aiding them.

Not even Blackphone are claiming their offering is NSA proof.

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Anonymous Coward

Another triumph of designers vs. common sense

Great to see a bunch of common sense, "I told you so" fixes in 7.1.

As somebody who has been involved in the design and development of several projects, I can say with confidence how this one went.

Designers: hey, let's make all the backgrounds painfully white with SUPER thin fonts!

Developers and everybody else: that's stupid

Designers: no, it'll be great, trust us, everybody will get used to it and like it

Management: do whatever the designers say, they have a vision

Developers: fine, but we'll just have to change it back in 6 months

(6 months later)

Developers: okay, everybody hated it and we changed it all back, thanks for wasting our time, and plus, we told you so

Designers and management: well, it's kind of your fault for doing it wrong in the first place, right?

Aaaaaaand repeat...

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Re: Another triumph of designers vs. common sense

More like:

Developers: See, we told you that we'd have to change it back in 6 months.

Designers and management: We don't remember you telling us that.

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Pirate

Re: Another triumph of designers vs. common sense

Well, that would be your own fault for not sorting out the email in which you told them that, and clicking "reply all" to send the followup.

Oh, you didn't tell them by email? Honestly, there's no helping some people.

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Re: Another triumph of designers vs. common sense

Maybe they had 10,000 unread emails, and only use iPads?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Another triumph of designers vs. common sense

"Well, that would be your own fault for not sorting out the email in which you told them that, and clicking "reply all" to send the followup."

Yup, if there's one thing managers love, it's being reminded that they're wrong by their underlings, especially when "reply all" is used... where do you work?

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