Feeds

back to article Microsoft to get in XP users' faces with one last warning

Microsoft will give Windows XP users one final warning that their operating system is about to go feral. Redmond's been talking up the death of XP for two years, but will now use the operating system itself to put the news of the software’s demise right in the face of every single user with the dialog box below. Microsoft's …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

Hopefully this doesn't end up bricking swathes of ATMs across the globe

24
2
Mushroom

I hope it DOES brick ATMs'. anyone building embedded systems using consumer desktop software deserves everything they get.

33
8
Silver badge
Stop

I hope it bricks them too - but not in a 'ner ner -- serves you right' way, but in the hope that these devices will be made with more secure software in the future.

11
3
Silver badge
FAIL

I doubt it, for starters I don't think an ATM, running Windows Embedded (which is not end of support) would be connect to the internet and set to download automatic updates.

Still facts, who needs them.

14
2
Anonymous Coward

How was XP Embedded ever a "consumer desktop software"????

5
0

Welcome to the internet where the facts are made up and it doesn't matter.

8
0
Silver badge

> I don't think an ATM, running Windows Embedded (which is not end of support) would be connect to the internet and set to download automatic updates.

And what colour is the sky on your planet?

There are lots of ATMs running off-the-shelf WindowsXP/2000 and most of them are connected to the bank branch LAN which is connected to t'internet. You wouldn't believe how much we saved compared to the old embedded ATMs and all those leased lines.

3
4
Anonymous Coward

Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

So in other words, a complete and utter non event :)

19
16
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

> So in other words, a complete and utter non event :)

This pretty common attitude pisses me off.

Y2K was a non-event precisely because serious fixing was done. Sure there was a lot of scare-mongering, but it helped in getting resources to make it a non-event. No, civilization as we know would not have ended without Y2K fixing, but there would been a lot more inconvenience and confusion, probably also loss of life.

Very frustrating for the programmers and managers involved: Had there been problems, they would have been blamed, and now that there were no problems, they are ridiculed.

47
7
Silver badge

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

"Y2K was a non-event precisely because serious fixing was done."

What? You mean slap a sticker on it that says "Warning: This device is not Y2K compliant". Been there done that. I shook my head the entire time, but hey, it's a paying job.

9
18
Bronze badge

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

Sorry to hear you had such a boring Y2K. Where I worked, programs were actually fixed, and vendor patches applied. Not a sticker in sight.

19
0
Silver badge

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

But the idea that a washing machine would think, "It's 1st January 1900, I haven't been invented yet, I'd better explode and set the place on fire" was pretty stupid though.

14
3
Happy

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

>Sorry to hear you had such a boring Y2K. Where I worked, programs

>were actually fixed, and vendor patches applied. Not a sticker in sight.

Likewise. And then the next set of vendor patches applied as the previous set had broken another facet of y2k compatibility..

I'm looking at you Microsoft! Strangely enough, all the unix machines we were patching were much less hassle!

2
0

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

You are forgetting the tens of thousands of computer systems that were audited, found to faulty, then patched. Which, in the case of bespoke systems, is a little more than just applying the latest patch, update or service pack from the vendor. I know of a few cases where to alter a system, due to it being written in an archaic language like Cobol, they had to pay a programmer to come out of retirement to do it. Even where systems did have a ready made update, any company with a proper change procedure would still have had to ensure that any patch for mission critical systems is thoroughly tested before deployment.

Another way to look at it.

The Airlines and Banks were amongst the first adopters of computer technology. This, combined with a slight reluctance to change core systems and processes mean that companies in both industries have a *lot* of computers and software that is old (some dating back to the 70s). That nice, pretty GUI the check in desk person sees when you check in to the airport probably sends keypresses back to the mainframe (which is still running the original software), and "scrapes" the output..

Now, did you see any Airline disasters during y2k? No? How about Finance? Did any major banks collapse during Y2K? Did any major economies collapse as their currency sunk to a point where you'd need a mortgage to buy a packet of sausages? No?

Why not? Because tens of thousands of people tested these systems to ensure that there would be no problem, and tens of thousands of programmes wrote updates to ensure it wouldn't happen.

We came of relatively lightly (only a couple of old, easily replaced, systems failed our Y2K compliance test, but even we only found that out after testing thousands of items.

10
0
Silver badge

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

Banks mostly dealt with Y2K years before. Sold a 25year mortgage in 1980? Guess when it became due!

Very few avionics systems need to know the date and don't store it as time_t.

1
2

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

'But the idea that a washing machine would think, "It's 1st January 1900, I haven't been invented yet, I'd better explode and set the place on fire" was pretty stupid though.'

Maybe, but my 2 year old video recorder refused to record anything by the timer once we got past 31st December 1999. Thereafter if I wanted to record something I had to be there and hit the "record now" button.

It wasn't a cheap model either.

1
0
Facepalm

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

I had to work that night, just in case any of our clients had a major issue.

Why wasn't my satellite owner/operator employer worried about their own systems?

They'd gone around a couple months before and told all the old, but critical systems, that it was 1985...

Could be interesting to see if any of that old kit that nobody even manufactures replacements for is still in use at the end of this year.

0
0
Facepalm

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

:-) COBOL archaic? Well, I guess it probably is - but then COBOL / FORTRAN (and other archaic languages) based systems run pretty much everything you rely on and has done for 50'odd years.

Because these systems are generally well written in a *clean* language, they don't need the same day-to-day care and attention / life support of a C++ / C# / Java based system with constant patches / fixes / updates. So, I wonder - are there any Java-based mission critical systems out there? Will Java see its 50th birthday? I really doubt it.

0
0
Alert

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

"Banks mostly dealt with Y2K years before".

Having worked are two schedule one (or tier level one, depending on the local terminology) institutions, with friends in two other schedule one banks, I can call bollocks on this.

Yes, the mortgage departments were keen on this, and well up on Y2K issues in many cases as far back as 1970. Their mainframes were well prepared.

Other departments, including treasury, branch management, personal banking, corporate banking, etc. were less so. The invasion of PCs in the 1980s resulted in a shedload of branch-developed apps that conformed to little or no formal standards, and they spread like weeds. And then there were the Unix-based Treasury departments that deployed Y2K non-compliant systems as late as 1992-1993, and in one case, 1996, with the caveat of "don't worry, this will be decommissioned and replaced by 1999, so it doesn't matter".

Many bank apps were converted decades before Y2K. Many more were converted in the five years running up to Y2K. And there was definitely a forced march effort in the last six months prior to Y2K to replace/scrap non-compliant systems in the banking sector.

0
0
Go

Woo hoo! Phishing opportunities galore!

I expect, indeed I will be disappointed by the lack of foresight by the scammers if it doesn't happen, to see a story on El Reg on the 8th talking about evil redirects and fake popups appearing on XP users' computers mimicking the illustrated message box.

I also expect El Reg to publish a bunch of pics of the message box on ATMs, traffic signs, supermarket tills etc, etc.

24
1
Mushroom

Re: Woo hoo! Phishing opportunities galore!

I actually thought that Microsoft's popup did 100% resemble a phishing dialog.

Things are sure to become quite interesting in the near future.

All that's left to say is... Yipieee!

17
0

Re: Woo hoo! Phishing opportunities galore!

If I hadn't read this article, I would have got out my arsenal of malware removal tools and sniffed around for ages.

Even if it mentioned online it's legit - there's no guarantee.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

huh ?

But my windows 95 will still work ?

10
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: huh ?

Still using Win 2K on a VM. Nice and lightweight, does what I want. Why do I need to upgrade again?

10
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: huh ?

We are still using win2k on some of our internal servers. Although the only reason is that no-one actually knows where they physically are so they can be reclaimed, virtualised and upgraded.

We suspect they may be sat in the server room of a rented building we no longer rent :)

15
1

Re: huh ?

I'm swapping a W2k for SBS 2011 this weekend. Only reason they are moving is because they are running out of space!!

0
0

Re: huh ?

Maybe you can triangulate it's location using ping latency.

4
2
Bronze badge
FAIL

Run. Quickly. Away.

Sadly, one cannot even say it was nice while it lasted. 'Tis a pity they could neither get it right the first time, nor fix it over the years. Fail.

Win7 support is ending. Win8/8.1 is confused. Win9 is rumoured. Fail.

Microsoft panic message. Fail.

11
11
Bronze badge

Re: Run. Quickly. Away.

'Win7 support is ending'

Regular support for an OS that is already five years old moves to extended support next year, through to 2020. That's not too bad. I'm sure you'll manage.

Calm down, dear, support isn't even nearly over.

7
1
Gold badge

Re: Run. Quickly. Away.

"Win8/8.1 is confused."

Only if you haven't read Microsoft's published statements on the matter. Win8.1 is considered a service pack for Win8 and so support for the latter will evaporate in 2016. From the end-user's perspective, since 8.1 *is* almost indistinguishable from 8.0, there's no reason not to install it (when you next have several gigabytes of download allowance per machine to waste).

"Win9 is rumoured."

2015 is also rumoured, in the sense that it hasn't happened yet but it would be rather surprising if it didn't. (I suppose there's always the possibility of some Ukrainian teenager shooting an Arch-Duke.)

0
1
MJI
Silver badge

Re: Ancient hardware

Is this the hardware we spent a fortune on 10 years ago? The hardware which has done its job with no issues, which has gained bigger HDDs, more RAM?

The hardware which when my work PC failed ended up in the office for 1 year, and was the fasted machine in the office despite being built so long ago.

If old hardware is fast enough why scrap it?

The killer for me as a home PC was MPEG2 encoding was slow, now a second PC at home.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

I can hardly wait to

click on Don't show this message again followed by a click on OK. It is not Microsoft that will kill my Windows XP, it will be Mozilla, Videolan, Adobe and Oracle when they will no longer support their WinXP version for my browser and its much needed plug-ins.

Windows7 will give me enough time to get used to any non-Microsoft OS. Or I'll just stop using a PC altogether because by that time there will be not much use for it.

17
1
Bronze badge
Holmes

When you threaten Meetup, it's blackmail...

Some DDoS scammer has been attacking Meetup, and we properly call that blackmail, but when Microsoft threatens you, it's just good business practices. Does anyone else think there's something wrong in this picture?

Slightly substantive comments:

(1) Since Windows XP is quite adequate for my computing needs, I would not have upgraded any machine except for the threats from Microsoft.

(2) If Microsoft were actually held liable for the damage done by their mistakes (including bad design decisions), then you can be certain they would design their software in an extremely different way.

(3) I still expect Microsoft to offer some form of XP support. Not because they think it's a good thing or the moral thing or anything along those lines, but just because there's too much money still left on the table.

13
14
Gold badge

Re: When you threaten Meetup, it's blackmail...

I suggest you learn the actual meaning of the word blackmail.

5
1
Bronze badge
Happy

Re: When you threaten Meetup, it's blackmail...

1. Windows 3.1 is adequate for most peoples needs, you have a point and click interface and it can run a word processor. You don't have to upgrade you can ignore the messages and continue as normal (The same as any OS, what do you think your crusty old router runs).

2. Humans make mistakes, computers are designed by humans, etc...

3. You can still get support by giving MS money, otherwise why would they bother they want you to buy new shiney items.

3
2
Gold badge

Re: When you threaten Meetup, it's blackmail...

1) Windows 3.1 "multitasking" was Metro-class garbage. "Most people" need multitasking. Windows 95, OTOH, is just fine. (Well, OS2 is just fine. It didn't crash all the damned time.) People also need APP SUPPORT. That means Windows XP at a minimum today. Decent browser, VLC, a few other things. That said, if you could load all that up on Windows 95, hey, it'd be more than good enough.

2) You aren't allowed to make mistakes, peon. There are an unlimited number of people waiting to take your job. Get back to work, work doubly hard and I'll fire your ass at will anyways.

3) No, I can't get support by giving MS money. They have minimum numbers of systems and the floor price is extortionate. I'd gladly pay MS the cost of the OS all over again to get another 3 years. Hell, if MS want me to pay them $150/seat every three years to keep XP going forever, I'd gladly do it.

I don't think anyone has an objection in the slightest to paying MS a fair price for ongoing maintenance. MS doesn't offer maintenance to everyone and what they do offer is not remotely "fair".

I don't care how much Microsoft desperately want me to buy Windows 8.1 and use Azure for all things. It isn't going to fucking happen.

2
0
Bronze badge

Re: When you threaten Meetup, it's blackmail...

1) Ah you need MultiTOS then, just write whatever is missing

2) Yes I am allowed to make mistakes, what am I supposed to do when testing my work fire myself for every typo?

3) I stand corrected there, <Insert Whitty Comeback>

0
0
Silver badge

They surely will bring out XP 2.0, won't they?

I mean not bringing out a sensible upgrade option which runs on the same hardware, supporting the same software, that would be like betraying their customers. Microsoft is such a big and trusted partner, they would never do that, would they?

Microsoft doesn't care about "Gold Partners" or anything. Those are just marketing terms. All they want is you to give them money. I know that may sound harsh to you, but Microsoft is a commercial company, they need to make money, that's their priority.

If you don't like that game, stop playing it. Don't switch from XP to Windows 8.1, but look into getting replacements for your legacy applications. For those you cannot find replacements for, get an Application server, Wine or a virtualized XP machine with tightly controlled IO.

9
3
Silver badge

Re: They surely will bring out XP 2.0, won't they?

"They surely will bring out XP 2.0, won't they?"

They did. It was called Vista. Remeber how great that turned out?

2
1
Bronze badge
FAIL

I Had To Turn Off 'Update'

My portable became unusable because the windows update snagware was hogging all disk capacity 'checking'. I realised it was bent, when it had read 200% of the total disk capacity. Stopped the crap and suddenly it was like running a new, as in brand new PC a real Woohoo.

I did try the Fixit which promptly failed reporting that it was useless and could only give up. Well done Microsilly.

5
2
Anonymous Coward

Re: I Had To Turn Off 'Update'

Have an upvote. I had to turn it off on my wife's PC - all she does is play age of empires/mythology and some basic browsing on it (no financials etc).

Auto-update was truly cacking it up. Turned it off and hey presto, runs like baby snot off a hot shovel.

3
1
Silver badge
WTF?

Huh?

"Credit where it's due: Microsoft is making the effort. It's also forged struck up "a partnership with Laplink to make available a new free tool, allowing individuals to easily copy files and settings from a Windows XP PC to a device running Windows 7 or newer.""

In other words, Microsoft is making the effort to sell more Microsoft products.

How is that creditable?

In fact, if the software was fit for purpose when realeased, people would be able to use it indefinitely - most sensible people don't trade in their old TV just because there in a newer one with better features - as long as the features their current TV has are all they require.

17
3
Bronze badge

Re: Huh?

"most sensible people don't trade in their old TV just because there is a newer one with better features"

Really? You're on the wrong website for comments like that. There isn't anyone that sensible here. 3D TV anyone....?

5
4

Re: Huh?

"most sensible people don't trade in their old TV just because there in a newer one with better features - as long as the features their current TV has are all they require."

I've been quite happy with my analogue Sony* Trinitron, but at the moment it is under threat from an "upgrade" to a digital-only signal. I really don't watch TV often enough to warrant lashing out on a fancy new TV.

* bought before before Sony did their silly trick with rootkits on CDs, in case you wonder

2
0
MJI
Silver badge

Re: Huh?

Well my previous FD Trinitron had a digital tuner, but I moved to HD & LCD when the tube just started to lose brightness in the corner.

None of my TVs have had root kits on them, the newest runs Linux

0
0

Design issue with that website

These people are still using XP. Why take them to a black-and-blue flat website with a Windows logo that barely resembles the one they're familiar with?

I wouldnt trust this as far as I could throw it.

14
0
MJI
Silver badge

Re: Design issue with that website

I showed my wife that site, she thought it was a scam site as well.

At least try to make it look like windows.

1
0

That message will appear on all XP desktops.....

..... that have automatic updates enabled (surely?)

6
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: That message will appear on all XP desktops.....

Probably a phone home feature or an automated date triggered popup added to XP already pushed in one of the many updates since 2001. (maybe even added back in 2001 - "always be closing" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-AXTx4PcKI) Remember Microsoft own your computer (COFEE), you are are merely providing it with electricity and maybe a network connection..

0
0

Re: That message will appear on all XP desktops.....

If you don't have automatic updates enabled anyway then the end of support probably isn't going to affect you...

1
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.