back to article Candy Crush King stops trying to trademark CANDY in the US

Games developer King has abandoned its attempt to get the word CANDY trademarked in the US, to go with its matching European trademark. The company said that after being awarded the trademark for CANDY CRUSHER, it no longer felt the need to pursue a trademark on the word CANDY. “King has withdrawn its trademark application for …

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Gav

Candy in America

They may as well tried to trademark "Mom's Apple Pie", "Cookie Dough" or "Pizza".

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Joke

Re: Candy in America

Or "Lager" in the UK.

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Re: Candy in America

Lager Chug Saga, and Real Ale Quaff Saga?

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Flame

What's in a name?

If they have registered their trademark in the EU, then clearly they haven't been stopped by the well-known manufacturer of self-immolating washing machines (see icon).

Different target demographic I suppose, so little risk of confusion.

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Re: the well-known manufacturer of self-immolating washing machines

...Bendix...?

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Windows

Re: What's in a name?

Trademarks are specific to an industry. 'Windows' in the computing industry is a trademark of Microsoft, but that doesn't mean every glazier in the world is infringing on it, because they're in a different industry, so there's no danger of confusion.

What's irritating about 'Candy Crush' is the insidious infiltration of our beautiful language by yet another hideous and redundant American word, viz. 'Candy'. What's next, 'Mom'?

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Re: What's in a name?

"What's irritating about 'Candy Crush' is the insidious infiltration of our beautiful language by yet another hideous and redundant American word, viz. 'Candy'."

Um, the origins of the word 'candy' are a little older than the USA:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/candy

The French, Arabs, and Persians might take issue with your assertion of US origin, heh.

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Re: What's in a name?

"Trademarks are specific to an industry. 'Windows' in the computing industry is a trademark of Microsoft, but that doesn't mean every glazier in the world is infringing on it, because they're in a different industry, so there's no danger of confusion."

Maybe but in the office you might like to refer to any inbuilt glazing as "Environment Awareness Panels" to avoid confusion with statements that include the word windows when dealing with IT issues.

And I guess the office is where MS are getting their inspiration for new products and names. Look left - Windows, look up Tiles, watch out for new likely new products called doors, walls, floors etc..

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Re: What's in a name?

Oh, sure the roots of the word are older, but its modern usage comes to us from America. Like trick-or-treating - an Irish custom that came to the UK via the USA. And it's redundant because Britain has, or at least had, its own words and customs, thank you so much.

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Joke

So, for once, sanity prevails...

...how'd that happen?

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Re: So, for once, sanity prevails...

Really?

So how come the maker of "Candy Crush Saga" got a trademark for "Candy Crusher" ??

As far as I can see these two are not the same...

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Gav

Re: So, for once, sanity prevails...

Because they asked, it was available, and they had the cash.

You don't have to make something called "Candy Crusher" to trademark it.

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Re: You don't have to make something called "Candy Crusher" to trademark it.

Actually you do. You can apply for the trademark before you start making it, but pretty soon thereafter you need to be using it to differentiate yourself if the industry segment for which you applied to get the trademark. I'm not sure what the period of inactivity is before the trademark can be challenged for non-use.

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huh.

I thought all the silly things came from the USPTO.... Seems the USPTO got this one right, and their EU counterparts got it wrong (oh so wrong).

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