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back to article Imprisoned Norwegian mass murderer says PlayStation 2 is 'KILLING HIM'

Norwegian convicted mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik has threatened a hunger strike if prison authorities don't upgrade his video game system to a PlayStation 3, among other demands. "You've put me in hell," Breivik wrote to officials in November in a letter obtained by Agence France-Presse, "and I won't manage to survive …

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If they were serious about punishment

they'd give him a Windows 8 machine instead.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

Now come on, that would be inhumane.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

That would be cruel and unusual punishment.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: If they were serious about punishment

"That would be cruel and unusual punishment."

Accede to his request. He'll be gutted when he finds out that GTA isn't actually realistic.

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Litigation

It won't be long before he starts litigating on the grounds on 'unusual and in humane treatment'.

I can understand that he is not allowed games with guns and bullets, but it would be so much cheaper to let him starve to death and use his body to fuel a furnace.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

they'd give him a Windows 8CE machine instead.

Fixed that for you.

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Re: Litigation

"much cheaper to let him starve to death and use his body to fuel a furnace."

If you let him starve to death the energy content of the corpse will be fairly low. Better to fatten him up, leave a few nooses around as a hint, and then burn him. Possibly restrict his liquid intake so he's a bit dehyrdrated - the higher the water content the less energy you get out.

I'm all in favour of dead people as a renewable fuel. In fact I'd round up hippies, convicted murderers, and climate change enthusiasts and throw them in the hopper alive - why waste bullets, or make a bolt gun dirty?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Litigation

Have you seen the post on Slate about the research showing that Internet trolls who come over as narcissistic sociopaths or psychopaths are in reality - narcissistic sociopaths or psychopaths?

here

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Devil

Re: Chris T Almighty Re: If they were serious about punishment

"they'd give him a Windows 8 machine instead." Nah, for real misery inducement, it would have to be IBM's OS2 Warp, on an IBM PS/2 (see what I did there?).

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Re: Litigation

"In fact I'd round up hippies, convicted murderers, and climate change enthusiasts and throw them in the hopper alive - why waste bullets, or make a bolt gun dirty?"

Climate change enthusiasts? People who are working for climate change? Curry, Linden, Mcintyre, Watts, those guys?

I think you're a bit harsh.

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Re: Chris T Almighty If they were serious about punishment

" Nah, for real misery inducement, it would have to be IBM's OS2 Warp, on an IBM PS/2 (see what I did there?)."

Now that would be both cruel and unusual. But personally I see nothing wrong in either.

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Re: Litigation

"Climate change enthusiasts? People who are working for climate change? Curry, Linden, Mcintyre, Watts,"

On the correct side of the Atlantic those names ring no bells, I'm afraid, so no witty or facetious response is possible. But you could pretend I did manage it?

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Re: Litigation

>"Climate change enthusiasts? People who are working for climate change? Curry, Linden, Mcintyre, Watts,"

Why the hate? Do you really think anyone is listening to the eggheads? Don't worry you and the Koch brothers are going to get the future you want careful what you wish for, etc. As for wanting people to die I guess you fear people when they have to something to say that is dangerous.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

>grow up for fuck's sake

The butt hurt is strong with this one. Shareholder, re-seller, ???

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Litigation

I'm all for that, but add the idiots responsible for RoHS and REACH to that list, for crimes against technology.

Giant hornet enema should be the penalty imposed on Breivik IMHO, burning alive is too quick.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Litigation

Being a hippie, I'd produce too much CO2 with all my wooden beads.

Anyways, you need us, we abate your negative vibes so the world'll keep turning in all its wondrousness for a while longer.

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Unhappy

Re: If they were serious about punishment

"Call me pathetic all you like but the fact that the first comment on this article was a pathetic dig at Microsoft says a lot more about the commenters on this website than anything else."

Totally agree. I know this is a site full of geeks, but still I was shocked by the lack of real-world-understanding show by these commentards, their upvotes, and your downotes. Not that it's important, but I'm one of the few who upvoted you, and downvoted them.

The replies on this topic are more like those on sickipedia.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

"they'd give him a Windows 8 machine instead."

Prison is about rehabilitation, not punishment. You can't give him something that will make him want to go out and kill someone.......

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Facepalm

Re: If they were serious about punishment

"Prison is about rehabilitation, not punishment."

100% wrong. Prison has four aims:

1. punish the offender

2. keep the offender out of society so they can't reoffend

3. deter other members of society from committing similar offences

4. rehabilitate the offender

Item 4 is one of those things that's only done if possible. The level of recidivism in released inmates clearly shows that giving them playstations, TVs, etc weakens 1 & 3 so much they are essentially ineffective. Rehabilitation is basically one of those things - "while we have him in our prison, we may as well try...."

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

With a name like Fluffy Bunny, you'd think you'd be less serious. My comment was an insulting dig at Windows 8, not actually a comment about the role of prisons.

If I was actually commenting on Brevik, I'd say just surgically remove his eyes, ears and tongue and let him spend the rest of his miserable life, dark and alone, dependant on the charity of others, not whining that his playstation doesn't have the cool new games.....

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Facepalm

Re: If they were serious about punishment

"Call me pathetic all you like but the fact that the first comment on this article was a pathetic dig at Microsoft says a lot more about the commenters on this website than anything else."

Ah, so unless every comment in regards to this person is about stripping his skin off and rolling him in salt they are morally objectionable?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: If they were serious about punishment

"grow up for fuck's sake"

No, you are quite right; they should have given him a Windows ME or Windows 3.0 machine. With no service packs.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

Even better - Windows ME

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

You do understand, that "grow up for fuck's sake" will be taken as "I am a little child that can't make an argument yet, but learned swaering, so I use this. Please give me lots of attention!", right?

Hence the downvotes and the fact that people keep ignoring your "statement" and actually give the statement you acted agains more value?

The second comment is a lot better and shows, that there is someone there with a working brain who is able to converse instead of swear, why couldn't you post something like this before?

Why the profanity, when a simple "This guy killed a lot of people, most of those teens and you are starting with a microsoft joke?! You can't be serious!", would have gotten you much more attention and might have stopped the whole "one joke after an other" posts.

About the Article:

Where I the wareden, I would restrict his access to a typewriter down to paper and pencil and take away his PS2 and other electronic devices for at least a month.

This guy behaves like a spoiled child, hence I would treat him this way.

I hope that they will never let him out, since his grasp of reality seems to remain rather loose.

This person is soooo not fit to enter society again!

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(Written by Reg staff)

Re: Re: If they were serious about punishment

The Norwegians believe in rehabiliation, to the point where Breivik's likely to be released in 15 years' time.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

100% wrong. Prison has four aims: I love this, but feel the need to explain.

1. punish the offender

The purpose of this is to make him hate us. If he didn't hate us before, we must make sure that he does. This is important to point 4 below.

2. keep the offender out of society so they can't reoffend

This one has a side effect - it protects us.

3. deter other members of society from committing similar offences

In other words, scare us so bad, only psychopathic miurderer and criminals will ever commit crimes.

4. rehabilitate the offender

See point one. We need criminals, we need them to apply peer pressure to one another, use their cognitive dissonance to rationalize their crimes, so they can commit better ones when they get out.

Punishment has been used for 30.000 years. It's a proven solution.

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Re: Litigation

I'm sure Breivik would hire you as a consultant :)

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

You forgot the 5th one which applies in most countries.

5. Waste tax payers money giving them luxuries they don't deserve!

As inhumane as some former communist countries were and maybe some still are, Sometimes a bullet to the back of the head is the best option for certain crimes! cheap and painless and puts an end to it all so everyone can move on.

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Facepalm

Re: If they were serious about punishment

So it's not punishment you want, it's plain simple public revenge? Great 90% of the time when when you get the right person but a real bark when you paint the wall with the brains of an innocent person!

Tell you what why bother with all that justice bullshit either, eh? Just instigate several teams of covert death-squads, simple, plain street justice it's "cheap and painless and puts an end to it all so everyone can move on". The biggest advantage is that with no evidence of who killed the person, no one has to clean up the mess, except the victim's family! Save an absolute bundle in taxes!

Just a word to the wise though, don't piss off the wrong person, cut anyone up on the road or annoy any of your co-workers, they might mark you out as an undesirable and next thing your family might be soaping down your guts from their living room wall!

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

Not as gutted as when he finds out all those cool adult games they gave him for his PS2 don't work on the PS3 they replaced it with. Oops, must have been some cross communication there. It'll be resolved as soon as possible

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

It's worth pointing out that Norway has one of the lowest levels of recidivism in the world, something which is largely attributed to the focus on rehabilitation over punishment

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

"Punishment has been used for 30.000 years. It's a proven solution."

But only if the punishment is sufficiently severe to prevent the offender from ever re-offending. A callous mass-murderer has already stepped completely out of societies norms and value-system. Lovely one-to-one chats that aim to re-adjust their perspective can never work.

But a sentence of absolute misery, deprivation and unending torment might just spark the realisation that "if I do bad things, bad things will happen to me, so be nice". I'm not talking about torture or capital punishment here, I am talking about unending boredom mind-numbing tedium, hard hard work, zero stimulation, absence of routine, constant fear and discomfort. Giving prisoners TVs and a playstation to occupy their days is purely electronic baby-sitting - I know people who spend all day every day in front the TV/playstation - out of choice. If they trash their cells or riot as a group, well so long as they can't get out of the facility that's fine by me - they will learn to live with the consequences of their actions - certainly no loss to me or society as a whole.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

"It's worth pointing out that Norway has one of the lowest levels of recidivism in the world, something which is largely attributed to the focus on rehabilitation over punishment"

But Breivik can not be rehabiliated - ever!! It is absolutely impossible, how can he ever be reintroduced to society. Lets say he's released in 20 years time, would you accept him living next door to you, dating your daughter, showing your son how to use a gun or how to lead a moving target? I'm guessing not.

So given that rehabilitation is completely out of the question, all that is left is incarceration and punishment and he deserves a lifetime of both.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

@ proud2bgrumpy

To give a couple of examples.

Members of the Baader-Meinhoff* terrorist organisation RAF in Germany did return to society after serving gaol time.

Members of the Blekinge Gang terrorist organisation in Danmark returned to society after serving gaol time.

These people were ideologically driven political terrorists with no compunction about killing their targets in cold blood - amongst the most ideologically driven evil people you are likely to imagine. Yet apparently they now walk freely amongst us here in northern Europe.

Now, I leave it to you to decide if you think that it is a good thing or not, but the blanket statement "But Breivik can not be rehabiliated - ever!! " is not true just because you say so and choose to believe it so. It may be true, but neither of us have any way of knowing that.

*For those of you who did not live in Europe during the baader-meinhof RAF terror era, here is a link chosen at random - http://www.baader-meinhof.com/

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

@ Philip Lewis

Breivik can never be rehabilitated because society will never accept him back - I tried to make that point - it doesn't matter if he has a change of heart, he can never rejoin society because he is simply too well known and his appalling crimes will never be forgotten within the lifetimes of the affected generations.

So you might argue that perhaps he *could* be given a new identity, but I'd say that rejoining society with a false identity is NOT rehabilitation because he will continue to live on the periphery of society where he never has to answer to his past actions which are simply too heinous for forgiveness. If you disagree, I'll ask again - would you want him dating your daughter after his apparent reintroduction to society?

Now, I do know an ex-car thief, an ex-burglar and an ex-drug dealer (marijuana) - the're all law-abiding guys now (so they say, and I have no reason to disbelieve them). Two of these guys do regret their actions, the other simply doesn't want to go back inside, -BUT- they don't have (or need) new identities because the extent of their crimes are within the bounds of society to forgive.

So like I said before Breivik can never be rehabilitated (back into society as Anders Breivik) and giving him a false identity so he can pretend he never did bad stuff is just not rehabilitation.

Well known UK ex-cons who have accepted what they did and who are accepted back into society:

Mark Wright (footballer / car thief), Gino D'Acampo (TV chef / Burglary 2 years), Leslie Grantham (actor / 10 years manslaughter), Martin McGuiness (First Minister of Northern Ireland / former provisional IRA & proud owner of a 500 ibs car bomb), Robert Thompson and Jon Venables (child murderers) in 1993 who were apparently rehabilitated, given new identities only to reoffend similarly again in 2010 (Thompson, I think)

Even in the context of this escalating list of crimes and ex-cons, there's one hell of a gap before we get to Anders Breivik. So like I said Breivik can never rejoin society (under his own identity) and therefore can therfore can never be rehabilitated.

BTW, I did give you an up-vote because even though I completely disagree with your conclusion, your observations are interesting and add to the debate

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

@ proud2bgrumpy

You can hardly disagree with my conclusion - "hanging is too good for them" and "lock him up and throw away the key". Those two statements sum up my personal position and are quoted in case you missed them. So, it is hardly likely I want ABB dating my daughter.

However, my personal position is irrelevant to discussing the concept of rehabilitation of politically motivated murderers! They exist, have always existed, and apparently rehabilitation happens (proofs by existence).

The knee-jerk reactions of some people's posts here need a counterpoint of abstract reflection to demonstrate that those opinions and feelings are not necessarily "truths" in any abstract or logical sense. They are in many cases not even defensible positions to take in many societies.

You might look up what some of the now released Baader-Meinhof felons did. These people were very seriously evil. Apparently "society" can and does accept the rehabilitated back, no matter how heinous the crime. Like I said, it is up to the individual to reconcile themselves with this fact, and the society in which they live, or indeed want to live.

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

"BTW, I did give you an up-vote because even though I completely disagree with your conclusion, your observations are interesting and add to the debate"

Well said, sir, amongst the peurile humour (guilty, yer honour), the dogmatic moralising grandstanding, the factually wrong, and the purely opinionated, that is the best contribution in this thread.

And for all those complaining about supposed trolls, do you not think the whole article has really, really weak tech angle, and is PURELY and simply posted to generate some interest?

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Re: If they were serious about punishment

"So it's not punishment you want, it's plain simple public revenge? ... Tell you what why bother with all that justice bullshit either, eh? Just instigate several teams of covert death-squads ..."

That's a slippery slope fallacy. That Shane 4 suggested quick punishment (or revenge) for a self-admitted and convicted killer does not directly lead to eliminating the preceding trial, due process, careful consideration of evidence, and appeals.

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Re: real misery

For real misery, they'd have to give him Amy's First Primer....

http://www.danielsays.com/ss-gallery-dos-sw-amys-first-primer-12.html

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Trollface

It's got to be done : "Cardinal Fang! Fetch... the Comfy Chair!"

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Anonymous Coward

Well

I wasn't expecting the Spanish Inquisition.

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Re: Well

No one ever does...

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Re: Well

Actually the Spanish Inquisition used to give people a month's notice before "interviewing" them.

So pretty much everyone expected them.

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Trollface

Totally sadistic

"Your XBox One, sir, as requested"

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Devil

Give him a tablet...

With nothing but Flappy Bird on it.

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Anonymous Coward

Atari 2600

Is all he should get.

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Re: Atari 2600

And a rope.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Atari 2600

With the ET game.

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