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back to article Another one bites the dust: AVG kills its remote access service

AVG has shut down its remote access service Crossloop. The security company acquired Crossloop in 2012, to support what it says is a “ rapidly growing AVG CloudCare offering”. Despite the @crossloop Twitter account boasting it connected “ 20,000 computer support experts” AVG shuttered the service last Friday. Users aren't happy …

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They had an extra service?

I have never even heard of this service.

So much for their marketing.

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Re: They had an extra service? (@ecofeco)

Nor had I heard of it, and I'm an AVG reseller. Having said that, they probably stuck some stupid "cloudy" name onto it, making me automatically ignore it... If only AVG could stick to making a decent, lightweight AV product and steered clear of all these other pointless gimmicks!

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Re: They had an extra service? (@ecofeco)

"Nor had I heard of it, and I'm an AVG reseller."

Same. But I also ignore their talk of cloudy stuff (much like I ignore almost every company talking cloudy).

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>>>Let's hope that article points out comparable remote access features are baked into major operating systems, making Crossloop and LogMeIn less-than-stellar examples of innovation or value-adding. Let's also hope that article points out that cloud services cost actual money to run, and that without cash flowing in even the small sums one can pay to rent a server these days can add up to unrecoverable bills

Lets hope we can find a writer working on a weekend who could write said article. Oh wait.

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Lets hope we can find a writer working on a weekend who could write said article. Oh wait.

+1 to that!

I can't believe such an appallingly written article got through the editor... oh wait...

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An undeniable fact for future fiction to blaze a plausible razing trail

Let's also hope that article points out that cloud services cost actual money to run, and that without cash flowing in from paying customers even the small sums one can pay to rent a server these days may not be sustainable.

Servers now rule every worthwhile world. Of course they need to be paid for. The flash cash though will flow from that which and/or those who have a sincere perverse desire to right royally reign with dumb rule over every worthwhile world.

And central bankers will do everything in their power and anything with their powers to attract and hold onto those who and/or that which supplies servers with the intelligence information that renders fiat currency flow, a toxic liability ........ and that is most easily done by ensuring and assuring and insuring such thin clients have limitless credited accounts for lavish spend programming projects?

And, with particular and peculiar regard to that very specifically highlighted central bankership role, if you be thinking that they don't or they won't, then knowing that they should would be an indication that you know they will not survive in the future in command and control of wealth and prosperity in peace and harmony and madness and mayhem. CHAOS will prevail with AI ProVision via Cloud Hosting Advanced Operating Systems Presenting Future Horizontal Events ........Newly Ordered World Order Programs with Novel Media and Noble IT Following Ab Fab Leads.

And yes/no, a question mark isn't missing to imply and cause anyone to doubt anything in all of that shared and aforementioned.

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Facepalm

Full refunds are on offer for paid accounts

Erm why do you need to request it, if a service you subscribe to is cancelled the vendor should do the decent thing and refund you.

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Meh

Did not know it existed.

And now it does not.

So probably not something I could not live without.

Along with quite a lot of other people it seems.

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The trend of cancelling before the customers can react

This is happening a lot. Remember when Google axed Apps for Domains a while back? They also did the pull-the-plug-then-update-the-webpage trick. What all these companies want to do is to avoid the massive spike in usage that the imminent shutdown would cause.

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Anonymous Coward

Hmm...

The company I work for actually had 10 or so Crossloop licenses so this is pretty annoying. I didn't have a very good impression of AVG before now and now I'd rather stab my eyes out with a fork than use their products. I've never seen something handled so poorly in my life. They shut down the servers without telling anyone early last week and they're not even trying to retain customers (customers are people who pay).

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Used it but switched to teamviewer

I have used that service -before it was acquired by avg- but I switched to Teamviewer a long time ago, since that offers a faster experience, and a better interface. and works on Linux....

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Well

That's certainly the most passive-aggressive way to end a news article.

I think most techies understand that the niche thrives precisely because there isn't a unified remote access or screen-sharing mechanism in modern OSes, though. Port-forwarding and configuring VNC or RDP? Please, no. NX, RDP are fantastic for general remote working, once set up, and most VNC flavors rather less so, but none package it all up into a simple pre-configured control panel usable across all OSes with all the bells and whistles like TeamViewer and LogMeIn.

It's not that the niche is about to collapse, it's that there's apparently no room for too many players. The elephant in the room, Citrix, just about has a lock on the market, but they missed their chance to dominate the freemium end with GoToMyPC years ago.

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Anonymous Coward

please explan

just a line telling us what Crossloop actually was would have been nice

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