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back to article Quivering, spine-tingling wearable tech: Strap it on and don't look back

If you’ve never had back pain, then thank your lucky stars. It can make a 20-year-old feel like they’re 100 and it’s a sore point that I know this to be true. If you’ll excuse the pun, you’re not necessarily lumbered with back pain as a life sentence, some problems can go away over time but they can just as easily return if you’ …

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JDX
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With the strap-on in place

Possibly that hypen is a little misleading :)

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Lo-tech alternatives

Been there, done that...martyr to major back problems (thanks to years of sitting badly in front of computers)

The short term solution for many years was the odd visit to various very helpful chiropractors, who usually managed to sort things out temporarily, but it always came back as it was a posture problem.

Finally someone recommended Alexander Technique, which aims to teach you how to re-train your whole posture. Found a wonderful local teacher. It took a while and quite a few quid, but worth every penny and then some. No more back problems. A few years ago I couldn't stand, sit or walk comfortably for more than fifteen minutes, now I can stand all day.

I really, really recommend finding a good Alexander Teacher - and possibly then add on some technical gadgetry like this to help keep you on the straight and narrow once you really understand the principles of good posture.

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Metal detectors

Anyone got any information about its effect on those bomb detector portal thingys.

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Anonymous Coward

How many advertisers get your info?

"demanding with height, weight, gender and age" More personal info for daddy google, who doesn't believe anyone has privacy.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: How many advertisers get your info?

well, the review claims there's no web thingy yet, so maybe it's not too bad.

Or just buy yourself an(other) android phone for (just, only) this kind of thing, and keep it in airplane mode so it can't leak any info /until/ you explicitly connect it to your own network, where you might manage leakage..?

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Joke

I found just moving the sensor half an inch lower could make all the difference, as the strap on can ride up with wear.

Is it being sold through Grace Brothers then?

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Just to put this out there

Hitting the gym can help to better posture and lower back pain. By building core muscles, you encourage more natural and correct positioning of your body, and it can also help with other things, such as encouraging the use of your abs instead of using your back (maintaining a straight posture, lifting, etc.)

But then obviously you need to use correct posturing when exercising or you could bugger yourself up even more.

It also helps if you have... Well, I forget the real name, but its where your lower back curves inwards more than it should, so you end up with your bum sticking out back and your belly pushed out front as you lean back your shoulders. Again, it's the building and development of core muscles and their uses that helps correct this condition.

Worked wonders for me, at least. I mean, I'm flabby again now, but still.

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I wear mine a little lower...

And back to front...

Mmmmmmmmm.... Nearly at the station!

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What next?

A strap-on device that alerts my boss when I'm asleep at work?

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quackery

Is there ANY scientific evidence for any of this ? Or is it basically an extension of chiropractics generally (and therefore utter quack mince).

And evidence = triple blind scientifically peer reviewed trials.

NOT 'i did this and it worked'

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Re: quackery

"Is there ANY scientific evidence for any of this ?"

Evidence for what? People developing persistent aches (or spinal problems) due to prolonged poor posture?

Fuckloads, lots of people working 9-5 in offices end up with aching necks and backs if their chair, desk and monitor aren't all set up at the right heights.

Communal network printers don't just economise on having a printer on every desk - they force people to get off their arse and stretch their legs for a minute since many employers don't have adequately adjustable furniture to properly suit every shape and size of employee.

The boss works standing now as he was getting tingling in one leg which was found to be a trapped nerve in his lower back from slouching at his desk. Works for him. Hard work at first as his leg and core muscles needed to build up to deal with the additional exertion of standing up instead of sitting, but he swears by it now.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: quackery

Does this encourage you to sit up straight? As far as I know this isn't good for your back. It's more important to support the back.

The BBC had an article about it a while ago:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/6187080.stm

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Re: quackery

Personally, I'd carry a quacking duck if it would fix my back reasonably often.

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Hmm

Research 7 years ago that hasn't changed the orthodox view... I'm not sure whether to believe it.

My experience includes RSI - I'm tapping this on a touchscreen upright in front of me now, using FITALY - and a certain amount of pain from computing in various alternative postures before this arrangement.

Orienting the spine vertically isn't all that you have to do to achieve orthodox good posture. You also need to straighten your spine by basically lifting your head straight up vertically from your customary round-shouldered slouch, - according to a physiotherapist I knew.

So maybe they didn't do that.

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Anonymous Coward

osteopath=quackery

"you have one leg shorter than the other" (hint so does everyone)

"we can cure asthma" (no you can't)

"we can do manipulation on babies to cure colic" (tipped over from deluded to amoral scumbag)

*not* professional as they don't need insurance or a professional body to practice

and the "manipulations" that they do are pure placebo effect

you don't need to spend £100+ to be told not to slouch by a quack or that sitting at a desk for hours on end isn't good for you

major problem with Britain is that anyone is allowed to call themselves a doctor

guess how many osteopaths have severely damaged their "patients" with their grade 5 manipulations and been "struck off" by their "professional" body.

er...none

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Re: osteopath=quackery

Quackery only after the point at which the technique is intended to work. Of course it isn't going to cure asthma or colic, but corrections of posture, and the way joints work have some value. I've used chiropractors with some success in the past, and I'm currently seeing an (NHS) physio who has me doing exercises that involve the same type of stretching and manipulation of the joints/ligaments, again with some success.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: osteopath=quackery

An NHS physio has to be member of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Has professional indemnity and has gone to University for years to do their Physiotherapy degree.

Also they practice as part of a heirarchical professional structure ensuring that people are only working within their competencies and that there is continuing professional development.

Do not confuse actual health professionals with quacks that get their "qualification" with enough crisp packets after a total of 6 weeks.

They are snake oil sellers along with the homeopaths, the crystal freaks and the poo smellers preying on the vulnerable and weak.

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Happy

The Tingler

First thing I thought of when i saw this was the old movie with Vincent Price.

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Happy

Re: The Tingler

And remember, when the movie originally came out in theaters, it too would shock you upright. The famous 'PerceptoVision' courtesy of Wm Castle. [see also the film, "Matinee"]

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Its a waste...

First, it depends on what's causing your back problem.

Herniate or rupture a disk and you are in for a world of hurt. It takes a course of steroids and flexeral to help get you to the point to where you can start Physical Therapy.

Then as another poster said... its called strengthening your core.

All this device does is act as a positive re-enforcement for things you should be doing. And there are free low tech ways you can achieve the same thing...

Bottom line, best thing... focus on strengthening your core and to lose that extra weight.

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Reminds me of an earlier craze....

Around 1820.

Google 'Grecian Bend"

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Unhappy

Often not realized what a poor mattress, oversized pillow or bad sleep posture can do.

All of which can make you feel about 100 years old.

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