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back to article Look out, Earth! Here comes China Operating System (aka Linux)

China is backing a mobile operating system designed to offer a state-approved alternative to foreign platforms. Dubbed China Operating System (COS), the platform is set to launch first on handheld devices, with a possible expansion to other platforms. According to reports from tech blog Engadget China, COS was designed by …

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Anonymous Coward

你们所有的基地都属于我们 !

Would me a more appropriate title (All your bases are belong to us) :-)

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Re: 你们所有的基地都属于我们 ! [base not baseS]

It's "All your base are...." (singular)

Kinda spoiled the effort.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 你们所有的基地都属于我们 ! [base not baseS]

Solly, but in Chinese no plural - so bases or base is same thing - as long as we get all of them !

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Re: 你们所有的基地都属于我们 ! [base not baseS]

Why do I have a feeling this will turn out to be the equivalent of Engrish?

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Re: 你们所有的基地都属于我们 ! [base not baseS]

Rinux?

Anyway, bet you a quid after The Party has had it's dabs on this summer of the MD5's won't line up any more...

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Anonymous Coward

你他妈的

你他妈的

More appropriate when patents start to fly.

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Joke

Pinko-commie cancer!

I knew it! You just can't trust those Europeans! They're in league with the enemy!

Nuke 'em, that's what I say!

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Paris Hilton

The long march!

Hold on. China is not Yurop, and hasn't been in some time?

Anyway, the question is: Will it be gloriously open?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The long march!

Anyway, the question is: Will it be gloriously open?

Exactly right. Personally, I don't think there will be any other way to get this to market, otherwise it'll be buried in claims of "containing spyware" from those very trustworthy entities in the US (NSA, Google et al).

(note: for the humour impaired, that was sarcasm),

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Re: I don't think there will be any other way to get this to market

Maybe not to our market, but I doubt the entity making this is targetting our market. This product is clearly for their home market, and I don't know if Chinese users have yet grasped the importance of Open Source.

And if their product is user-friendly and useful, then the question may be moot. Besides, we all know that, if the Chinese government wants integrated surveillance, there will be no one (alive) to oppose it.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The long march!

Give them credit for getting the same landmass though :)

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Re: The long march!

It's the one on which you don't want to have landwars.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: I don't think there will be any other way to get this to market

The Chinese don't consider Open Source as important because as far as they're concerned there's Open Binary, Open Hardware and Open Design.

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Re: The long march!

Chinese operating system containing spyware from NSA.

You need to rest quite a bit.

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Real communists...

Real communists use BSD.

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As we learn from Android

The kernel isn't very important. What's more important is whether there is a common hardware platform to enable easy vendor-independent updates. Another important issue is the software distribution model. Will there be a healthy model like the one most Linux distributions use, or an App-Store?

Just saying "It's based on Linux" is more or less a null-statement. It's the default kernel for new projects. Few are insane enough to build something new on VxWorks or Nucleus.

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Re: As we learn from Android

Current slogan is "Let a thousand hardware platforms bloom!"

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The install package will (of course), be three times that of a vanilla install

That is based on the amount of crapware, malware and spyware installed alongside other famous Chinese language software packages.

Strangely, the international (English), versions of these packages are only a fraction of the size.

Dont believe me?? Go compare the Chinese language and International versions of QQ, the Chinese version of Skype/IM.

(Go Compare! Go Compare!!# argh!!, now I have visions of that nasty bloke with the twisty moustache stuck in my head).

PS, hasnt anyone told G.C. that Blakey was an INSPECTOR, not a driver yet??

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Re: The install package will (of course), be three times that of a vanilla install

(Go Compare! Go Compare!!# argh!!, now I have visions of that nasty bloke with the twisty moustache stuck in my head).

Go, and hug your Meerkat Plushy, some more, and the bad man will go away...

Simples!

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Re: The install package will (of course), be three times that of a vanilla install (@ Ian Emery)

That could be due to the fact that there is a gazillion Chinese characters instead of the paltry few hundreds most of the rest of the world uses. Text input methods are also a nightmare to program, and things like a simple text-to-speech converter are hideously complex for Chinese. And a Siri equivalent would probably need several times more computing power than that available to all the NSA. ;-)

And on top of all that, 'Chinese' is not a single language, but dozens of dialects, many of which are mutually unintelligible.

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Joke

Re: The install package will (of course), be three times that of a vanilla install

nah... they don't have to put additional spyware, just change the server where data are send from nsa.google.com to chinese.goverment.cn

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Re: The install package will (of course), be three times that of a vanilla install (@ Ian Emery)

Actually, they only have ONE written language; and I speak from experience on how much spyware, malware and crapware they install by default on the "local" version, I cleaned it all out of my (Chinese) wifes computer and got the final install down to nearly the same size as the international version.

PS. Text input is done in "PinYin" which uses English characters that convert on-screen in Chinese ideograms.

PPS I have also had experience of the Chinese "360" Internet browser and Security suite, which is basically a rip off of Internet Explorer and also chock full of malware, spyware et al; so much so it actually shows as malware on most Western AV and AM packages (and breaks underpowered PCs with its payload demands).

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Headmaster

Re: The install package will (of course), be three times that of a vanilla install (@ Ian Emery)

Well, TWO written languages, Traditional (used in Taiwan, Hong Kong and other places) and Simplified (used in the Mainland). And dozens of input methods, PinYin being the most popular phonetic one on the Mainland, but shape-based methods, such are Cangjie and CKC are also popular. There's also the handwriting-input methods.

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nice comment

Having opened the video, and scrolled though the user comments, one comment jumped out "Copy Other System"

that made me get some napkins and clean my desk.

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Coat

Re: nice comment

Peruvian Operating System would have lead to a completely different comment of course

Sorry, I'll get me coat

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Under the GPL

they should cough up the code on request....

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Re: Under the GPL

This is actually the modified Glorious People License!

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Alien

Re: Under the GPL

Yes, it's Linux known as COS, but I have to ask whether it would it would qualify under the "general public license" within the eyes of the Chinese?

After all, they could justifiably believe they've put enough work into it to exempt it from the GPL

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Re: Under the GPL

Mondo - there is no 'enough work' clause in the GPL.

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Re: Under the GPL

Tom 7 - there is no 'GPL matters' clause in international politics.

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Re: Under the GPL

Chinese don't care about western-style "Intellectual Property".

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Re: Under the GPL

The definition of "Enough work to exempt it from the GPL" is "Enough for it to constitute an entirely new work in its own right, aot a derivative work based on an existing copyrighted work".

Funnily enough, nobody seems to have any problem with this concept when dealing with old-fashioned, closed copyrights (the kind which the GPL specifically forbids you to apply to derivative works of GPLed works).

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Re: Under the GPL

"The definition of "Enough work to exempt it from the GPL" is "Enough for it to constitute an entirely new work in its own right, aot a derivative work based on an existing copyrighted work"."

There is a phrase for this level of work, "clean room implementation"

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Re: Under the GPL

If you start with the original work, and replace every single line of it, it is still a derivative work of the original.

If you start with one guy in a room somewhere reading the original work and telling you in his own words what the module should do, whilst you sit in another room without the original work reimplementing it, it is not a derivative work.

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Coat

Re: Under the GPL

Unless that guy works for Google and the guy starting the lawsuit works for Oracle...

(SCNR)

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GPL and all that

Only the copyright holders can enforce GPL, therefore GPL gets its teeth from copyright law.

Since China seems to have a rather cavalier attitude towards copyright, it would seem that GPL is probably not going to be that solid.

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Re: Under the GPL

"The definition of "Enough work to exempt it from the GPL" is "Enough for it to constitute an entirely new work in its own right, aot a derivative work based on an existing copyrighted work".

Funnily enough, nobody seems to have any problem with this concept when dealing with old-fashioned, closed copyrights (the kind which the GPL specifically forbids you to apply to derivative works of GPLed works)."

A headache that's yet to be resolved....

Cos after all, when a GPL project discovers they're carrying code that ísn't GPL compatible, they "rewrite" the code -- no cleanroom, just "delete code and add something that does exactly the same thing" -- and then they tell us that it's not a derivative work of the very same code that they were directly recreating....

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Anonymous Coward

OSS

And because it's linx we will e able to inspect the code and insure no back doors are placed by China.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: OSS

They'll have just removed the NSA/GCHQ code and replaced it with their own version, so you won't notice them.

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Re: OSS

They'll have just removed the NSA/GCHQ code and replaced it with their own version, so you won't notice them.

No, they won't even do that. They'll just keep the NSA's code and merely change the IP address it sends everything to!

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Chinux or maybe Plinux

The peoples linux where security matters

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

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Re: Chinx

If its pink its got to be Chintz shirley?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Chinux or maybe Plinux

People's Republic OS reads better with some capitals: PROs. It's also a nice poke in the ribs for the US :)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Chinux or maybe Plinux

"The peoples linux where security matters"

As opposed to normal Linux where it doesnt presumably.

If security was the aim then likely they would pick a more secure OS to start with like BSD or Windows Server.

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Re: Chinux or maybe Plinux

Windows server! Lol thanks for the laugh made my Monday!

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Re: Chinux or maybe Plinux

As my post was deleted, I apologise if I offended anyone.

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Laughing?

Only thing funny about this is your total ignorance of the relative security of current versions of operating systems. Windows Server 2008 R2 was very secure and WS 2012 is leaps and bounds ahead of any flavor of Linux in that regard. Either you don't work in the industry or if you do I feel sorry for the folks who are writing your check as they should really invest in someone who keeps up with current tech.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Laughing?

they should really invest in someone who keeps up with current tech

Errm, small tip: Linux moves on too. The issue is not how easily a platform can be secured and be kept stable, it's how much effort it takes. With Linux you spend less time planning for the bandwidth involved in updates.

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If Baidu and Renren are any indicator...

...this is a) the Chinese state trying to increase its control over the population, 2) is designed and run by the secret service, and iii) will mean that the state harasses and punishes manufacturers who stick with Android (or Windows Phone, if there are any).

Oh, and that design and probably some of the code will be straight-up stolen from the competitors. Plus of course that it will very rapidly become wildly successful in China.

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