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back to article Chinese Moon rover, lander duo wake up after two-week snooze

The Beijing Aerospace Control Center (BACC) has reported that its lunar rover and lander have reawakened after being powered down for two weeks. Earth in monochrome The black and white marble "During the lunar night, the lander and the rover were in a power-off condition and the communication with Earth was also cut off," …

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Joke

"According to the old stories, the rabbit is constantly pounding herbs on the lunar surface to give to the gods."

Wonder what "herbs" those are, considering the gods' recent behaviour...

</joke>

Seriously, well done those guys. Here's hoping for a lot more pix and data from lander and rover--cheers!

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Yes, well done, hope our donation helped...

... given that the imbeciles in westminster are still sending about £30 mil each year as foreign "aid" to china. Or should that read "bribe"?

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Not any kind of herbs actually.

For Chinese the rabbit is pounding the elixir of life for the Moon goddess Chang'e. In Japan and Korea it is said to be pounding rice to make 'mochii' or 'chapssalddeok' ricecakes.

*yawn*

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Perhaps they should send it to an Apollo landing site and take photos of the Astronauts footsteps.

Then I will believe that NASA sent men to the moon.

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FAIL

You question that NASA put men on the moon but think that China putting a rover there is something that can be relied upon as true? If you're going to have absurd doubts about nation states' lunar achievements, at least be consistent.

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@ Dalek Dave

If you do not already believe that men landed on the moon then I sincerely doubt that some Chinese pictures will convince you otherwise.

The evidence is already visible from The LRO images from orbit.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/revisited/#.UtUeD_RdXIc

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/news/apollo-11.html#.UtUfrfRdXIc

http://www.space.com/12835-nasa-apollo-moon-landing-sites-photos-lro.html

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This post has been deleted by its author

Sending robot devices is one thing, a manned landing is something else.

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Re: @ Dalek Dave

I see evidence of vehicle landings, not evidence of a man wandering about there.

There is a difference.

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Re: @ Dalek Dave

>not evidence of a man wandering about there

I see very little evidence on Google Earth of a man wandering about, yes lots of buildings and cars but very few people....

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Re: @ Dalek Dave

Well I have never actually seen people in America as I have never been there. Sure I've seen pictures and video, but they can all be faked right. In fact the more I think about it the more I am convinced that the UK is the only country and that everywhere else is just a figment of my imagination coupled with the UK propaganda machine.

Oh Fudge, I guess I am responsible for the French.....My Bad!

Now troll off!

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Re: @ Dalek Dave

@Dave,

Read this webpage and fuck off. Thanks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solipsism

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LDS
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Because that lander photo looks natural and true?

Guess I could do better in Photoshop...

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LDS
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No, they are the same. You just need a larger rocket to carry a bigger mass (because you need life-supporting systems). After all, only the US has been able to send rovers to Mars, and probes to the outer planets (USSR/Russia barely arrived to Mars, nothing beyond). Ask yourself why they never did...

It's all up being able to lift heavier payloads (and the oxygen/hydrogen technology is paramount in that), and being able to re-ignite a rocket after some time "coasting" in space (it's more difficult than you could think, because of temperature, lack of outside pressure, ecc. ecc.).

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Re: "Dalek" Dave?

for insulting the intelligence level of the Daleks, you will be... EXTERMINATED!

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Re: @ Dalek Dave

dave

get yourself a laser

get yourself a timer

and while you are about it, get yerself a feking clue m8

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reading required

The USSR did some pretty interesting stuff going to venus and mercury.

prolly dont count cos it's downhill all the way there

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Re: reading required @Naughtyhorse

"prolly dont count cos it's downhill all the way there!
I tend to think that everything is uphill from the surface of the Earth; it's just in the opposite direction. For example do you think that pushing a car from stationary to 30MPH is harder than stopping one that is driving towards you at 30MPH?

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Re: @ Dalek Dave

I have no problem believing that men have landed on the Moon.

But I'd like someone to convince me that Devon exists. I always thought that it was a folk-tale, and that Cornwall was an island...

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Facepalm

Re: @ Dalek Dave

I sincerely hope you're too young to remember watching the Apollo missions on TV.

If you had seen them, you would have no doubt that men walked on the moon. For $DEITY's sake, man, ham radio operators listened in on the transmissions. And what's the motivation for all the people that supposedly worked on that soundstage to keep mum for all these years? You'd think someone would have sneaked a camera in and could make a fortune selling the photos of the soundstage to the tabloids.

We really did put men on the moon. More than once. And brought them home safely.

// With slide rules and IBM 360s.

// ...and Real Engineering

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"USSR/Russia barely arrived to Mars, nothing beyond). Ask yourself why they never did..."

Oh I don't know - let me think:

Too busy getting the first artificial satellite, first animal, first man, first woman into space maybe?

Or wasting their time with manned space stations?

Or providing the only photographs of the surface of Venus?

I dunno, bloody Russians. Wasting their time with space research when they should have been sending a man to the Moon.

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Re: reading required @Naughtyhorse

my bad!

forgot the sarcasm tag for all the pedantic humourless bastards that hang out here :-)

</sarcasm>

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even more impressed....

that NASA put a man on the moon with 50's designs and 60's technologies!!

P.

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Re: even more impressed....

Real Engineers did that.

(not to minimize the present-day accomplisments of all who design for space exploration, but there has to be some bonus for doing it first)

// Beer's for them all, and the astronauts as well.

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LDS
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Re: even more impressed....

"that NASA put a man on the moon with 50's designs and 60's technologies!!"

Remember in those years were also developed the X-15, the SR-71 and the XB-70. There's nothing matching them now - only slower aircraft using a lot of electronics to perform better - it's cheaper.

We are now used to think about technolgy as pixels blinking on a stylish computer screen, and then computers were "primitive". But engineering was not - even if they had no computer to perform most calculations an simulations. There were smart people, and a lot of money available.

One of the key technology was mastering oxygen-hydrogen engines (being able to put those components into a tank and manage them, and also ignite them in space), because they allowed for the thrust/weight ratio needed to build a rocket able to reach the Moon with a payload large enough to carry men.

Then the rest is mainly celestial mechanics - once your are in the right direction with the right speed you'll end where you want.

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Re: Real Engineers did that.....

you mean ones that knew the difference between feet and metres

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Re: even more impressed....

>that NASA put a man on the moon with 50's designs and 60's technologies!!

and got him back again...

That caveat meant they had to get Real Engineers involved. Take the Real Engineers away and you get a Challenger...

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Re: Real Engineers did that.....

Too easy. Slugs and kilos, maybe. <http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mechanics/slug.html>

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Re: Real Engineers did that.....

..........and apparently US & Imperial Gallons.

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I don't think 'we in the west' is accurate in having this man on the moon folklore. I'm a brazilian and I had never heard of that before! Is that more of an anglo-saxon thing?

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"I don't think 'we in the west' is accurate in having this man on the moon folklore. I'm a brazilian and I had never heard of that before!"

No offense, but I don't think south america has ever been considered part of "The West". Its not a geographical term , its a political one.

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Humans have a very specialised part of the brain just to see and recognise faces; this is why people can 'see' a face where almost nothing indicates one (even the Mars 'face' is more of a face).

I never remember being able to see a face myself until a few years ago when it suddenly struck me that I could; even now I struggle to pick it out but I do understand why people see one clearly now.

As for a Rabbit, I will look for it next time there is a full moon.

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Anglo Saxons are mainly in The East.

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"No offense, but I don't think south america has ever been considered part of "The West". Its not a geographical term , its a political one."

He's right about the Anglo Saxon thing though, at least to some extent, what with "The West" pretty much being western Europe, north America, Australia/NZ. On the other hand, a lot of south America is sort of Anglo Saxon too thanks to the Spanish.

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Non Anglii sed Hispanici

a lot of south America is sort of Anglo Saxon too thanks to the Spanish

The Angles and the Saxons seem to have come from North-West Germany or South Denmark. More colloquially, the term refers to people from England. In recent usage it describes people from North America or former British imperial possessions, whose ancestors came from Britain, Scandinavia or the Germanic countries of Europe.

I can't see how the Spanish, or Spanish-speaking countries in South America fit into this. If we're going to categorise people by their Dark Age antecedents, then Visigoth, or perhaps Moorish, would be more appropriate for Spain.

I suppose the Germans who emigrated to South America in a hurry in 1945 might count as Anglo-Saxons.

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Boffin

"Anglo Saxons are mainly in The East."

Depends on which direction you're facing.

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Boffin

I don't think 'we in the west' is accurate in having this man on the moon folklore

Most of Brazil is below the equator so I'm not sure you'd see the Man's face anyway. Not sure how that works - perhaps he'd be on his side for some rotating to upside down for those further south?

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Anonymous Coward

It’s a hemisphere thing. In the northern one the moon looks like it has a face on it, in the southern it looks a bit like a rabbit. If us northerners either go on holiday to Australia, or more simply stand on your head for long enough tonight, you will be able to see the rabbit (but it takes a while to spot if you are used to the face. My relatives in Tasmania agreed with me that it is a bit of a rubbish rabbit, but it certainly does not look like a face the other way up).

Anyway, congrats to the Chinese for getting there and making it work. We're all rocket scientists at heart...

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Re: Non Anglii sed Hispanici

"I can't see how the Spanish, or Spanish-speaking countries in South America fit into this. If we're going to categorise people by their Dark Age antecedents, then Visigoth, or perhaps Moorish, would be more appropriate for Spain."

Good point. I don't get out much.

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Don't forget the Welsh!

I believe they are in Patagonia, but have no idea why.

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Re: Non-Anglii sed Hispanici

South America was already a place for Germans, long before WW2, hence it was an easy place to run to for those able - they had large communities to blend into.

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Joke

Re: Don't forget the Welsh!

...full of big sheep by any chance.

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It's not a rabbit..

It's a mouse shadow.

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Re: It's not a rabbit..

Have an up vote for the Dune ref.

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A lot of risk was taken for the Moon landings

The tech was possibly even older, Germany's rocket technology for instance, updated no doubt.

Given the test pilot deaths and injuries (watch the Six Million Dollar Man opening sequence) and the Apollo 1 launch pad fire as well as Apollo 13's well-known problems and one can see that the Moonshots were seriously risky endeavours.

Even the successful first landing was extremely close to a catastrophe or a tragedy depending whether Neil Armstrong had completely run out of fuel and crashed (catastrophe) before finding a safe landing spot or landed but had insufficient fuel to take off again (tragedy). I think it was less than 20s worth of fuel remaining, an impressive feat given the insane stress he must have been under - probably did have the right stuff. Even the subsequent take-off was not a sure thing because of the low fuel situation.

This is, of course, if they were actually there and not hyping it all from a warehouse in Nevada! Geesh some people are fucking idiots.

I became aware of how risky even NASA thinks it is when I saw the memorial wall at Canaveral after the Challenger disaster (and the launch I went to see having been cancelled because of a crack in a thermometer). The wall is enormous, many panels, with the aforementioned events are recorded on two of them.

Obviously, there is one for the Columbia loss but the wall is still almost empty and presumably less likely to stay that way for some time given that NASA is not really using people to explore space much any more.

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Re: A lot of risk was taken for the Moon landings

@cambsukguy I think I'm right in saying that the LEM descent and ascent stages used different fuel tanks, so the fact Armstrong landed with so little remaining fuel didn't affect the take-off.

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Re: A lot of risk was taken for the Moon landings

What is amazing is the crash shown in the opening of The Six Million Dollar Man was a real crash and the pilot walked away from it. (Well, was carried away from it) and he lived on until he died in 2006.

He hated the programme as it kept reminding him of the worst day of his life.

(Although I suspect that 1st of May 2006 wasn't a good one for him either).

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Re: A lot of risk was taken for the Moon landings

The pilot of the lifting body that featured in the Six Million Dollar Man titles actually walked away from that crash, although he subsequently lost an eye due to an infection picked up in hospital.

The Apollo 11 landing had around fifty seconds of fuel remaining at touchdown, if it got down to 30 seconds then an abort was required as the remaining fuel was needed to get enough altitude for a safe stage separation and ascent engine start. They were 20 seconds to that point, not to dry tanks, and as has been mentioned already the stages did not share fuel or engines.

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Mushroom

Re: A lot of risk was taken for the Moon landings

The tricky part of the return to Mike Collins in the Command Module was due it being impossible to test-fire the ascent engine without destroying it due to the highly corrosive hypergolic fuel used.

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Re: A lot of risk was taken for the Moon landings

@Vulch: I think you've taken two facts and drawn a slightly erroneous conclusion.

The "bingo call" was the point at which they had to abort OR land within the next few seconds. At the time, Apollo 11 was about 20 seconds away from the bingo call.

Subsequent analysis revealed that due to fuel sloshing around in the tanks, the low fuel level sensor (which triggered a latching indicator) was uncovered early and that the binggo countdown was started too early. The final analysis of fuel remaining indicated about 50 seconds left, which was on a par with all the other lunar landings. The lander was never designed to land with masses of fuel left.

Masses more here:

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/

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