Feeds

back to article T-Mobile US: AT&T's mobe buyout deal is so 'desperate', we'll do it too

T-Mobile US says it will buy rival carriers' customers out of their phone contracts if they switch to the pink-themed T-Mob. The firm on Wednesday announced that it would offer packages worth up to $650 to customers in America who ditch their mobile plans with AT&T, Verizon or Sprint and sign on with T-Mobile US. Under the plan …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

if only

I wish their network was better because I would love to switch to them from Verizon and save some money. I'll switch either way but AT&T looks to be where I'll wind up.

0
0
FAIL

Re: if only

If only I could get the Verizon service I pay for...I live in a metro area with almost two million people and can't get usable (if any) service over a good portion of it. To top it off, when I do get the full 4 bars of LTE its no different than the old 3g used to be. My phone will go to sleep before a media rich (read: modern) web page will load over 4g. I can't keep a call through the 20 minute commute; there is a particular spot that a handoff occurs, and the call is reliably dropped or one party loses the ability to hear the other...every...single...time.

1
0

not really first

It has been widely reported that this was T-Mobile's plan first, and was planned for announcement at CES.

Somehow AT&T heard about it and made their speedy announcement last week. Right from the start their move was labelled as "preemptive" which gives you the clue that it wasn't their original idea. And AT&T is doing it only against T-Mobile, while T-M accepts switchers from all three major carriers.

2
0

I'm checking; are either of these two companies located in the United Kingdom? If so, is that where all of this action is taking place?

Assuming these companies are in the U.S. (and wondering at why a British paper is interested), the way T-Mobile treated me, I'm not anxious to go back to them. Their network allegedly isn't that great as well.

Let's see. I bought the $20 that is what they were selling at Walmart, which was all I needed at that time, and tried to register it and get features and whatever, and they told me they don't support it because it is a "legacy phone". This phone was a joke. You couldn't delete voice mail without listening to it. You couldn't delete text messages without opening them, and you got charged for each text message opened, even if it was junk. You couldn't delete anyone from the address book. AND, last but not least... wait for it..... you couldn't upgrade a pay as you go account to a regular account.

AT&T is a little expensive; $55 for unlimited text, talk and web at the feature phone rate - but I'm getting what I'm paying for, which is good service. And I have a nice refurbished Blackberry style phone.

So, now, T Mobile wants us to drop all of this for some pink phone?

..... Whatever.

0
3
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: villandra

"are either of these two companies located in the United Kingdom? If so, is that where all of this action is taking place?"

I kinda hoped that this being specifically about T-Mobile US and AT&T would give away the fact that this is all happening in America. AT&T doesn't operate in the UK. I've made everything super clear now, though.

"wondering at why a British paper is interested"

We have millions of readers in the States (I gather you're one of them, hi!) so we're writing for you, too. We have an office in San Francisco and the article was published at 3.30am UK time - when Brits are (mostly) asleep and Americans are winding up the working day. I kinda hoped that would make it all nicely US focused :-)

C.

7
0
Silver badge

Re: villandra

There's also the matter that the announcements are coming during the 2014 CES, which is being held right now in America.

Anyway, I'm thinking of moving back to T-Mo myself (currently on an MVNO). It's hard to beat true Visual Voicemail (which no MVNO to my knowledge does), plus there's the benefit of WiFi Calling (Which provides more ways to make calls. Some of the places I go have hotspots but block cell signals). Thing is, it would mean a modest price increase, so I'm waiting to see if they sweeten the deal a little first.

0
0

I wish T-Mobile UK would do (or did do when they were a Deutsche Telecom solely-owned or earlier) something like this rather than being absorbed into "the EE family" and being spat out as one of the two identical yet unwanted children.

0
0
Bronze badge

Competition

Who'd have thought it? Competition actually working in the US telecoms market.

Bring it on. Those poor Americans have been raped by their carriers with exorbitant mobile costs for far too many years now.

2
0
Silver badge

Re: Competition

You have hit the nail on the head. I have a friend and they have a verizon deal, as it was the best deal. My friend and partner both have an iphone 5 deal with a government discount. One is an all you can eat data, whislt the other one is a capped 1GB data. They pay a total cost of $160 monthly.

Like WTF

0
0
Silver badge
Joke

Re: Competition

Gosh - think how lower the prices would be now if AT&T had managed to buy T-Mobile ... that deal was promising to lower costs too.

2
0
Silver badge

Re: Competition

AT&T … promising to lower costs too

And it would have. For them. While there is some irony in T-Mobile US using some of the money it got from AT&T when the deal went through to go after them, long-term further consolidation of the industry will take place.

0
0

Re: Competition

I live in New York and have AT&T. Their service is shit, but when I used T-Mobile (admittedly over 5 years ago) it was even worse. I live in Manhattan, walking distance from both Wall St and Midtown, and as I look at my iPhone now, I have 1 bar of service. I had to get landline service at home because so many calls drop / fail to connect that I can't use it for business.

For this stellar service I pay $140 a month for a grandfathered "unlimited" data (although they will cut you off after 6-8GB, so WTF?), unlimited texts, unlimited US calls, and an international plan that makes roaming and calls to and from other countries (slightly) cheaper.

I had better and more reliable service in Tierra del Fuego, on an Alpine ski slope, and in the underground in Seoul than I have in the middle of New York City.

So, yeah, I'd say the US cellular industry is ready for some competition and shake up.

0
0

Re: Competition

I agree, competition is good. Too bad the carriers aren't mandated to share frequencies and towers so there'd be a real level playing field. I with T-Mobile's signal was better for us. I manage 45+ cell phones for a small company and we moved from AT&T and tried T-Mo last year but the coverage was pretty bad outside of metro areas. We moved to Verizon as it's got the coverage we need and is a better price than AT&T.

0
0

Re: Competition

I have a pre-paid T-Mobile plan that costs $30 a month: 5GB of data, unlimited text and 100 minutes of talk time (but I can make unlimited free calls using my Google Voice number along with GrooveIP -- which utilizes my data plan.) In areas where T-Mobile has good coverage, the speeds are excellent -- 17 to 20 Mbps.

0
0

Not enough

While it sounds like a lot of money, you would still pay out of pocket unless you have only one phone line. Generally, the cost to break your contract is $200 per line. If you have a family plan the charge is separate for each line in the plan. What is needed is for all providers to abolish contracts. AT&T's rollover minutes should be enough incentive to stay there. T-Mobile's lower cost is an incentive to others. Verizon's claim to nearly universal service is an incentive to those who need such coverage. (Obviously V would have to improve their game to keep customers based on previous remarks.) Sprint might need to bring back unlimited data to compete. Just offer people a reason to stay instead of handcuffs.

0
0
Silver badge

Re: Not enough

T-Mobile comes the closest in that regard, mainly by disconnecting the phone installment plan from the service contract. They've also historically been the friendliest when it comes to unlocking and bringing your own phone. Their big problem until recently was spectrum, but with US LTE spectrum settling, it's less of an issue (AT&T and T-Mobile LTE phones tend to support both bands XVII and IV, respectively, meaning you can switch between them without losing LTE coverage).

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.