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back to article China, Brazil mourn loss of their $250m CBERS-3 satellite after fiery death

Brazil and China have failed in their mission to launch a climate-monitoring satellite into space. Officials said the CBERS-3 (China–Brazil Earth Resources Satellite 3) bird is believed to have crashed shortly after its launch from northern China's Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center at 0326 UTC on Monday. The primary cause is …

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Anonymous Coward

China really wants to the world to see how bad they are screwing up the enviornment

I vote for an someone was told to hit the self destruct button. {}:>))

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Re: China really wants to the world to see how bad they are screwing up the enviornment

"China really wants to the world to see how bad they are screwing up the enviornment "

Rubbish. Sounds like the same quality of tat that they often export. Good to see they aren't keeping the best stuff for themselves.

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Re: China really wants to the world to see how bad they are screwing up the enviornment

China's goals for reducing carbon intensity, and actual achievements in reducing carbon intensity, are far more impressive than most western nations. The only reason their overall emissions are growing is because they are bringing their people out of the third world and into the first world, and why shouldn't they?

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Anonymous Coward

Mugs

They could have Offshored it to India at much cheaper costs.

Just check out the MOM story. All the way to Mars for 74 million bucks.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Mugs

"Just check out the MOM story. All the way to Mars for 74 million bucks"

or one NASA toilet seat

*independance Day reference

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Re: Mugs

However, those 400 Indianauts ride on top of the rocket - which I guess is ok as long you don't hit anything...

;)

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Re: Mugs

As a brazillian, this is what pisses me off the most.

India sends a probe to the moon at a 59 million dollars cost. Then they spend a further 73 million to send another probe to the moon.

Whereas Brazil and China spend double that to send a cheap toy to a low orbit, and fail at that.

The previous sattelites of this series did make it to space, but they are broken. CBERS-2 had so many hacks in its electrical wiring that it's a miracle it took off at all.

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Re: Mugs

Perhaps someone needs to follow the money?

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Re: Mugs

"or one NASA toilet seat"

Except that we now know that Area 51 really just has Top Secret airplane development going on and the *real* budget is going to the NSA.

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Re: Mugs

A lot of Anal Resters here trying to impress us with their Literary skillls.

Pity they are ignorant about the Rocket business- All ,repeat All Countries launching Rockets experience failures.

The smart arses denigrating the Chinese would have trouble with Fireworks on Guy Fawkes night.

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Timely reminder that...

Despite all the great leaps forward made by China, India, SpaceX, the UK Space Agency (OK, maybe not them) in space exploration and the fact that satellite launches are commonplace, This shit ain't easy and every successful launch and payload placement is a triumph of human endeavour!

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Re: Timely reminder that...

"This shit ain't easy and every successful launch and payload placement is a triumph of human endeavour!"

True enough. American rockets still fail on occasion. Russian rockets still fail on occasion. Chinese rockets can be expected to fail on occasion.

Anybody else making and launching rockets can also expect them to fail on occasion.

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Re: Timely reminder that...

For those of us in the business of putting passengers on the things, they're TOO reliable.

Budgets are still based on the premise that 1 in 10 would be launch failures and we'd get to pocket the project budget without having to run the project. Now that everything has to be fully accounted for, there's resistance to increasing project budgets to cover the real costs.

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