back to article Evan Powell exits Nexenta as Wyse guy strides in

"Wyse guy" Tarkan Maner now rules the Nexenta roost, with Evan Powell, the previous and hugely influential founding CEO, walking away. The former chief of the ZFS-based storage software startup stepped back to become chief strategy officer in February. At the time, Mark Lockareff was the incoming CEO, a big company guy held …

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Bronze badge

software defined storage

is worse than software defined networking

everyone using those hype term should be shot

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Anonymous Coward

Re: software defined storage

It should be called out as software based storage vs. sw defined storage (SW defined storage needs to deliver more flexibility wrt APIs for provisioning, reporting etc). EMC did a good job organizing the marketing message around SDS along with the analysts. It cuts thru the hype

(I don't work for EMC or any analyst).

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Silver badge

As a term it sucks.

ZFS itself is mindbogglingly brilliant.

It's a pity that Nexenta operates the "dope peddler" pricing structure for its licensing - small deployments are cheap, larger ones become exponentially more expensive. (at 200Tb the annual support fees cost several times the purchase cost of the hardware)

That's put them on the naughtystep for the forseeable future at $orkplace.

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Nexenta in the middle

ZFS brilliant.

Nexenta trying like hell

Oracle boat anchor

Still waiting a ZFS home NAS at down to earth price though.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Nexenta in the middle

How big is your home deployment and what are the performance and data protection service levels you are trying to hit with your home NAS? Or is it just an experiment?

Nexenta is trying to create an enterprise grade product, which has no dependency on Oracle. They (Sun) open sourced ZFS or something like that (insert correct phraseology here... release it to open source etc etc) a while back, but it doesn't make them obligated to release innovation that the likes of Nexenta, Coraid, X-IO, Tegile and Nexsan can use as is. Why are you calling them a boat anchors. Are you looking to justify the lack of core file system engineering at some of these companies (not sure that matters)? Would love an explanation.

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1990's ???

1990s, really? Please is it asking too much to expect a tiny bit of basic fact checking?

alan.

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Mark Lockareef says

From Mark Lockareef:

Just read your most recent article on Nexenta. As you know, Evan did a great job building the company in the early days but needed to pass the baton onto a leader that could take the company to the next level. I joined Nexenta as our interim CEO in February to help the company find our next permanent CEO. You state that I "departed in pretty short order" but I was actually the interim CEO for 7 months...longer than I expected to find the permanent CEO (I thought my role would last about 3-4 months). Turns out that great CEO candidates in the next-generation storage space are few and far between. We actually got a lot done in those 7 months wrt building the foundation for growth. Now that Tarkan is on board, it will be fun to watch how he continues the story.

Just wanted to make sure you got the straight scoop.

Best,

Mark Lockareff

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Full disclosure, I am a Nexenta employee, but these comments are my own and not on behalf of my employer in any way.

Chris, you seem to have lost a decade. ZFS wasn't even /started/ until 2001. It didn't see the light of day until 2005ish, and it wasn't incorporated into any selling storage product until around 2008 (late 2008, is when the Sun 7000 line launched, as I recall). To suggest that ZFS is a '90's' technology is factually impossible, just for starters. Honestly, as it takes a filesystem a good decade to become mature, ZFS is only really /now/ reaching its prime. It is most assuredly not an aging 90's technology, I don't know how you can state that.

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Anonymous Coward

Wikipedia says

ZFS "development started in 2001"

"It was announced on September 14, 2004"

"Source code for ZFS was integrated into the main trunk of Solaris development on October 31, 2005"

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