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back to article NBN day of action fizzles as just 20 show at Turnbull's office

The day of action in support of Australia's National Broadband Network (NBN) has fizzled out, with just 20 people attending an event at the office of communications minister Malcolm Turnbull. Four of the twenty, including your correspondent, were media. One was a baby. The day of action was called last week, in order to deliver …

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Not surprised.

These are Australians you are talking about. The most apathetic, indifferent, uncaring, lazy mob of football-watching beer-swilling bogans on the planet.

The same thing happened back when we were organising protests against Conroy's internet censorship regime. In Adelaide, we had Nick Xenophon and the Premier present, and all of FIVE people showed up, because everyone else would rather get drunk and go to Womadelaide. It was an embarrassing farce for all of us, including Nick Xenophon, who put the time, money and effort into organising the protest, designing, printing and distributing flyers, doing the PR, organising the campaign, contacting public figures, setting up media coverage, and so on.

I gave up bothering that day. Our government could turn this country into fucking North Korea and as long as the fat lazy indolent bastards that comprise the majority population of this benighted country could have their football and their beer and their Australian Idol they wouldn't lift an arsehole to do shit about it.

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Re: Not surprised.

Some people say I'm apathetic but I just don't care......

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Re: Not surprised.

Poor, poor baby.

Maybe there might be a few more tax payers out there than you imagined who have a better than average idea of the consequences of the public purse funding a facility less than 2.5% of the population (including those who don't pay tax) will ever agree to purchase without a further subsidy.

Oops, perhaps the tiny angst indicates you might be one of the frustrated subsidy seekers

A thousand pardons

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Re: Not surprised.

"These are Australians you are talking about. The most apathetic, indifferent, uncaring, lazy mob of football-watching beer-swilling bogans on the planet."

I resent that comment! I do not watch football.

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NBN a fizzle

It's hard to get Australians to get excited about the NBN, when millions of us already have access to 100 megabit cable from competing telcos, but 87% of those passed by the cable choose not to access it at all. Telstra's FTTN gets me a constant 115 MBps, the NBN will cost more and give me a slower speed. No thanks! The copper is only there for voice calls, the network is hybrid fibre/coax and carries hundreds of channels of pay-tv in addition to 100mbps internet.

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Re: NBN a fizzle

Years ago I tried to get access to Telstra's cable which ran outside my front door. I was told "No. We don't have a cable server in your area and we are not rolling out any more at this stage".

Now I am in a new area. There is no cable TV in my street. I am lucky to get 8Mbps from my ADSL 2+ and only get that because I discovered that the second phone line is not pair gain (Telstra told me I couldn't have ADSL2+ when I knew the previous owner had had it) because they were only looking at the "primary" line to my place. I was glad when I was able to switch ny services over to my current ISP. I am now paying the same amount I used to pay Telstra for the phone line but I get Phone and Internet.

FTTN NBN over the crappy copper I already have is not going to be much better than I get now. To give me the speeds they are "guaranteeing" they are going to have to replace the copper so why not replace it with Fibre and be done with it rather than doing half the job and having to pay 3-5 times as much down the track when it eventually has to be replaced.

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Re: NBN a fizzle

> t's hard to get Australians to get excited about the NBN, when millions of us already have access to 100 megabit cable from competing telcos, but 87% of those passed by the cable choose not to access it at all.

Even harder when NBNCo reported that 47% of premises connected to fibre opted for the 12Mbps plan. These people won't notice a difference with FTTN.

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Re: NBN a fizzle

>FTTN NBN over the crappy copper I already have is not going to be much better than I get now.

You say you get 8 now. Malcolm's 6 year plan is to get a minimum of 50mbps... How is that "not much better"? Why would 100mbps be any better than 50? Where do you want to stop?

I personally would rather get something faster now than wait 10-20 years for ANY kind of upgrade. If you want to wait that long to get a speed increase, be my guest. But I'm a fan of Malcolm for simply wanting to get the damned party started.

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j.p

Re: NBN a fizzle

"millions of us already have access to 100 megabit cable from competing telcos, but 87% of those passed by the cable choose not to access it at all"

you know what? armchair surveys of mine, show that my 20-30 something aged friends generally

- wouldn't know what overhead cable network looks like, and

- assume that the ABS boxes attached to the side of their rental house are power or something

- figure the 'telstra' or 'optus' labelled outlets in their house are for cable TV

- wouldnt know that there is any difference between an ADSL and a cable connection,

- so make their decisions around the generally more cost effective offerings from non-Telstra and non-Optus providers, which inevitably are ADSL

I'm sure one could argue that these uninformed folk make up the majority of people in the country (hence the 13% uptake of cable connection where available) but i don't think that public policy and infrastructure decisions should be made around whether private firms are doing enough to emphasise for average-Jane or Joe, that their Cable offering is going to yield more efficient home business, more effective communications, or faster cat videos. We need to make such decisions, knowing that it might be under-utilised (50% of people opting for 12Mbps) in the short term, but knowing also that it can easily be purposed to a plausible future task such as complete removal of radio-based television signals to free up more spectrum for mobile data, and purposed to streaming of 4k resolution (or greater) TV signals straight down the 'service guarantee' optic fibre to your door...

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Megaphone

Re: NBN a fizzle

"I personally would rather get something faster now than wait 10-20 years for ANY kind of upgrade. "

Oh I agree 100%. Where I am now I am limited to 150Fbs because my exchange only supports ADSL 1

Oh, Telstra were rolling out DSLAM upgrades which would have given ne a more than acceptable improvment but then KRUDD and Underpants Man drew up the ludicrous NBN plan on the back of a fricking table napkin and that all wen't out the window. 5 years later and there is nothing happening, The NBN is way behind schedule, way over budget and completely underwhelming Their site suggests that I might have access to it around 2023. That is quite frankly an insult.

The NBN is a socialist inspired disaster of epic proportions and it is going to get worse.

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WTF?

?

Didn't know about this event.

Have a job I had to be at anyway, nomatter how much I support FTTP.

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It's a big land

I agree that Australians are not big at getting out and protesting. However, it's also a big land and as such very difficult in many cases for people to get to protests and most particularly when they are sprung with short notice and bugger all publicity.

I have no excuse regarding time as I am retired, but where was I supposed to be, not just a few kms. down the road for sure. Nope, I would have needed to drive hundreds of kms to get to my local member's office and back. Not an option for me, apart from which, I can't afford to buy the fuel. Others, not in my situation, had to work.

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Trollface

WE tried to teleconference into the event but the line dropped out.

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"Maybe there might be a few more tax payers out there than you imagined who have a better than average idea of the consequences of the public purse funding a facility less than 2.5% of the population (including those who don't pay tax) will ever agree to purchase without a further subsidy."

You are an idiot.

2.5% are you daft?

How about a 20 bn dollar IT industry?

how about a 1 trillion dollar economy that would gain from faster communications

The greatest benefit will be to business as this will be a massive productivity improvement.

How about the fact that this doesn't come from tax payers funds. It is borrowed money. It is borrowed, at a low rate, for which the company will be recompensed.

How about the fact that you are arguing for cheap and nasty instead of solid and long lived.

how about you are a dumbass,

People want this. They just know that turnbull aint gonna budge.

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Silver badge

"2.5% are you daft?"

Yes, you are right, it is more like 1.5% What an idiot indeed.

Five families in the Northern Territory are connected to the fibre national broadband network, with Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull gleefully revealing the latest figures from the company he now oversees…

The Communications Minister told Parliament on Tuesday that only 322 families in the Northern Territory were capable of getting a broadband service on the fibre network and of those households, only five have connected…

In a speech that drew laughter and jeering, Mr Turnbull taunted Labor about its “switching on” ceremonies in which ministers would travel to the Northern Territory to haul fibre to dramatise the progress of the NBN… Former Communications Minister Stephen Conroy “went to the Northern Territory more often than there are active connections on the broadband network,” he said."

LOL

Oh, and the "20 billion dollar a year IT industry" already has access to fibre numbnut. Where I work we have had a fibre connection for going on 10 years. This is not about businesses, this is all about kids wanting to get their porn faster.

"How about the fact that this doesn't come from tax payers funds. It is borrowed money. "

There is no way in hell that NBN co will ever be able to pay back $50-90Bn at their current pricing/adoption levels. It is economic nonsense to suggest they can.

This means that at some point in the future the government will be forced to either write off its exposure to NBN Co or take it over as a government owned company, at which point we are back to the grand old days of the government owned Telecom monopoly. Either scenario comes at a massive cost to the taxpayer.

"how about you are a dumbass,"

You really shoudn't be calling other people "dumbass" & "idiiot" by the way.

"People want this."

There are people who want free stuff you say? What a shock. Most people who have surpassed the level of juvenile simpleton however realise that there really is no such thing as free stuff. Somebody somewhere has to pay the price.

What you and your ilk are annoyed about is that there are plenty of people out there who don't want to buy a fast Internet connection for you. How inconsiderate of them. Don't they know your Battlefield scores are suffering?

You're just a junior socialist who wants everyone else to subsidise your desire for da faster internets.

Pay for your own stuff junior. Don't expect me buy it for you.

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Anonymous Coward

Meanwhile in Germany

After months of wrangling, they put together a grand coalition, with one of the agreement points to provide a minimum of 50Mbps to every German in 4 years.

The greatest criticism about this (e.g. Der Spiegel): who will think 50Mbps is still going to be enough in 4 years? First world problems, I guess...

Yes, I'm quite aware of the massive structural and geographic differences between Germany and Australia. In case you're missing the point, it's about what a real first world country thinks should be the necessary communication speed in the 21st century. As opposed to an increasingly second world Chinese colony (as defined by providing little but raw resources to the colonial power and buying their manufactured goods back).

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