Feeds

back to article BBC's 3D blunder BLASTED OUR BRAINS – Doctor Who fans

Does the BBC still dislike Doctor Who the way it did back in the 1980s? Its presentation on iPlayer of this past Saturday’s 50th anniversary special, Day of the Doctor, suggests it might do. The 3D version is giving us headaches and eye-strain, allege eager Whovians. The format chosen for streaming the show in a form suitable …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

jai
Silver badge

simple solution

watch the non-3D version on iPlayer instead then

12
0

Re: simple solution

Watch it twice, once with each eye.

11
0

Re: simple solution

Tipp-Ex the DOG on the screen (other correction fluids available)

3
0
Bronze badge

Re: watch the non-3D version

Judging the plot I'd say the normal version is at least 4D

3
0
Silver badge

Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

Of course the BBC shouldn't waste money on popular shows just because licence payers like them. How will the plebs ever learn if you give them what they want?

9
0
Bronze badge

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

The eternal BBC conundrum: give the plebs what they want and the snobs complain Auntie is dumbing down and the commercial channels squeal about their revenues and the Beeb's unfair competition. But don't give viewers telly they enjoy, and nobody sees the point of paying the licence fee.

14
0
Bronze badge

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

They have all these channels don't they, perhaps they could supply different viewer groups suitable programmes on different channels?

I enjoyed watching that Jim Al-Khalili last night, absolute science and equation pr0n!

2
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

>They have all these channels don't they, perhaps they could supply different viewer groups suitable programmes on different channels?

The trouble is then that you end up preaching to the choir, leaving those most in need of a little edification to watch BBC3. BBC4 ends up being defined by viewer group taste, rather than their native wit- so that's any science show that isn't presented by a member of Top Gear, Scandanavian drama, and Classsic British Rock biopics at the weekend.

3
0
Bronze badge

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

"leaving those most in need of a little edification to watch BBC3"

I initially read that as "most in need of a little education", then corrected myself, then got to the "watch BBC3" part and realised I was sort of right first time

2
0
Silver badge

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

Exactly: when first launched, BBC3 was billed as comedy for a general audience. However, it has evolved to become their 'yoof' channel, complete with 'yoof' orientated comedies and documentaries about STDs.

That's what Channel 4 used to be for, back in those happy days before Big Brother!

The idea of a general audience has died - though to be fair, much of that is beyond the BBC's control (multiple channels via satellite, cable or Freeview , and more screens in each household to watch things on, such as computers and tablets).

2
0
Silver badge

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

>perhaps they could supply different viewer groups suitable programmes on different channels?

That wouldn't take advantage of new technology.

Why don't they use 3D to supply different shows to different eyes?

That way your right brain could get Melvin Bragg while your left brain gets Trinny and Sue Bake Swap Makeover challenge

3
0

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

"The trouble is then that you end up preaching to the choir"

Dont mention the Choir. That bloody irritating, ginger bearded, tosser will appear here trying to recurit an 'el reg' choral group. Never have I encountered a person on TV I want to punch repeatedly in the face as much as him.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

Jamie Oliver and Derren Brown are both more irritating, but I understand where you're coming from.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Like, ahem, cooking pr0n and talent shows.

"The eternal BBC conundrum: give the plebs what they want and the snobs complain Auntie is dumbing down [but] don't give viewers telly they enjoy, and nobody sees the point of paying the licence fee."

I'd say it's as much the anti-license-fee zealots that seem to enjoy having it both ways with "damned if they do" and "damned if they don't" to suit the current angle of attack (though not both at the same time, as the disingenuousness would be too obvious.) They can't lose!

0
0
Thumb Up

Stick a Post-It note (or some other sticking thing) over the D.O.G. Post-It will appear in both eyes. Problem solved.

4
0

"Whatever it really thinks about Doctor Who, the BBC certainly isn’t keen on 3D."

That's because people aren't watching it - the Beeb often gets slated for wasting money, and rightfully so, but to make snide sounding comments when it actually employs common sense is a bit much.

"The transmission ... is the Corporation’s final 3D broadcast for the time being"

Yeah - I felt a great disturbance in the Force, as if eight or nine voices suddenly cried out in terror, and were suddenly silenced.

39
0

Better publicity ?

Part of the reason that the beeb may not be finding much uptake of the 3D service is 'cos they just don't seem to publicise it, from what I can tell. Since I seem to watch most things recorded via the PVR nowadays I *might* have missed related plugs,, but then we have the Radio Times and I'm pretty sure there's little mention of 3D transmissions there either.

Other than Dr Who and the olympics I really don't recall anything being shown in 3D - and that was squirreled away via the red button, which isn't normally (or certainly wasn't a while back) appearing on schedules.

(in the event that I've missed something, I'm sure there'll be someone along shortly to correct me..)

1
1
Bronze badge
Headmaster

Wait a week

The logo won't be on the 3D Bluray.

"Whatever it really thinks about Doctor Who, the BBC certainly isn’t keen on 3D."

Since they decline to inform viewers how to find the 3D programs, viewing figures will of course justify cancellation of their efforts.

1
1

Re: Wait a week

"Since they decline to inform viewers how to find the 3D programs, viewing figures will of course justify cancellation of their efforts."

Leaving the merits of 3D aside, this is absolutely classic BBC Programme Planning Dept tactics. Back in the old days, they clearly wanted rid of the classic Mastermind, with Magnus. Solution? Move from sunday nights, to monday at 19:30, up against the then behemoth that was Corrie. Result? Viewing figures plunge. Then they sharpen the axe. Just one example, they do it all the time.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Wait a week

"Back in the old days, they clearly wanted rid of the classic Mastermind. Solution? Move [to] monday at 19:30, up against the then behemoth that was Corrie."

Ironically, this is exactly what they did with Doctor Who in the late 80s, shortly before its cancellation- they put it directly against Coronation Street.

People have wised up to this, however. Even almost a decade back, Top of the Pops' move to Sunday evenings on BBC2 was widely seen as a deliberate attempt to sideline the ailing show prior to cancellation- which of course did happen a couple of years later.

0
0
Silver badge

Re: Wait a week

That's a practice they first tried with Doctor Who. Ironically the series got the best ratings that any show had got against Corrie for years, so for 1989 the Beeb made sure they held no press launch and did no pre-publicity. It worked. Ratings were down and despite ratings reviving after the producer held his own press call it was justification enough that the series was considered dead.

0
0

It sounds like the author of this story is another anti BBC troll. It was a technical error nothing more. I watched the 3D broadcast on a Sky box and no issues with that.

11
3
Anonymous Coward

"Tax" - really?

Licence fee, "tax", whatever. If you really want something to complain about abolish the fee make the BBC take advertising. Save money and be much worse off.

Personally, £140/year is worth it for any of Radio 4, 6 Music and iPlayer.

YMMV.

38
1

Re: "Tax" - really?

iPlayer is free and doesn't require a tax payment if you promise not to watch live streams.

I only pay the licence fee because I have to. If it goes, I'll buy Doctor Who on disc - I do anyway. I've given up on Radio 4 and will only go back if they promise to consult a dictionary and learn what the word 'comedy' actually means.

3
8
Anonymous Coward

Re: "Tax" - really?

YMMV - not least because none of the things you mentioned require paying the license fee! You can pretend that you are being a good citizen doing your part, but chances are your cash is just going on threatening letters, in a rainbow of exciting shades of pay-up-or-go-to-court-Red, to students and dead grandmothers.

4
14

Re: "Tax" - really?

Sounds like you need to tune into Radio 4Extra, you can get all the broadcasts of The Navy Lark, Round The Horn and The Men From The Ministry you desire.,

5
0

Re: "Tax" - really?

re cash wasted on threatening letters.

I totally agree with you there. For short while I had house empty waiting to be sold so I cancelled license payment. Soon after I got threatening letter. Not a letter asking me to confirm whether or not someone lived there or if there was a TV there. No they went straight in first letter to threats of legal action.

It appears the BBC start with the assumption that everyone is a criminal and every premise without a license is a crime scene.

Personally I wouldn't be too upset if the bbc itself was scrapped along with the license fee.

5
8
Silver badge

Re: "Tax" - really?

It seems that most people who are anti-BBC have never had the misfortune to watch US networked TV, or else are a competing news outlet with a right-ring bias (i.e, the Murdoch press, the Daily Telegraph etc).

That said, the BBC could do better, especially in drama. Compare 'Spooks' to 'The Wire', for example.

An informed and entertaining talk about the commissioning of quality shows - on both sides of the Atlantic - is here:

Armando Iannucci: BAFTA Television Lecture 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmViA8zRhLI

7
1
Silver badge
Linux

Re: "Tax" - really?

"Soon after I got threatening letter. Not a letter asking me to confirm whether or not someone lived there or if there was a TV there. No they went straight in first letter to threats of legal action." -- Ignore the letters, eventually they get bored and they stop sending them.

0
0

@Miek

"Ignore the letters, eventually they get bored and they stop sending them."

Do they?

Some 5 years after getting rid of my television, I'm still receiving periodic "you're a crim & we're gonna 'ave you" missives from Crapita on behalf of the BBC.

0
1
Anonymous Coward

Re: "Tax" - really?

To those purporting that advertising funded TV is somehow "fair". Have you actually thought that one through?

1) How much is the annual revenue from TV advertising in the UK?

2) from where does that money - ultimately - come?

3) How many households are there in the UK?

4) IIRC, the answer to 1) divided by 3) is about £160 - totally irrespective of whether the household even has a TV or not!

6
0
Silver badge
Joke

Re: "Tax" - really?

No need to pay the oppressive BBC tax - iPlayer, Radio 4 and 6Music are funded by pixies! Apparently.

2
0

Re: "Tax" - really?

Yes, "The Wire" was very good, but is it really fair to pick it as a program to hold up as a target for the BBC without mentioning the huge amount of low quality that's broadcast at the same time?

And there should be some financial measurements included - to get HBO would be another $15-20 on top of the cable charge

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: "Tax" - really?

Ho Boy!

I listened to Radio 4Extra for the first time a month or so back (streamed - Australia is just outside the BBC's broadcast footprint. Have applied for planning permission for a 2,700 Km aerial, we'll see what happens) and it was Round The Horne. Since then I've rediscovered ISIRTA (Radio prune), The Navy lark, Men From the Ministry and a host of others. last time I listened to this stuff was as a kid, so most of it washed over me and I never really understood just how close to the knuckle those shows went.

I remember as a teenager listening to Radio Active and thinking how edgy and controversial our modern comedies were (remember Anna Dapter, Uncle Mike Stand, Mike Flex and Mike Hunt?) compared to the stuffy old things my parents had listened to, so hearing them again and understanding more of what they are saying made me realise how clever those guys were (singlet-a little sing, goblet-a little mouth).

I don't pay the licence fee anymore, as an expat, but with a broadcast tv dominated by unfunny US 'comedies', simpering arselicking of people who are considered 'World Famous Celebrities' because they've been on Australian tv for the last thousand years, and sport, sport, sport, I sometimes wish to doG the BBC would open up a studio in Sydney.

1
0
Bronze badge

Re: "Tax" - really?

A new series of That Mitchell & Webb Sound started last night. It was the funniest thing I've heard in ages. And I defy anyone not to laugh at least once during an episode of I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue, even though all of the jokes are at least forty years old.

0
0

Re: "Tax" - really?

I love the fact that there is no adverts on the BBC and happily pay the licence fee - much much cheaper than sky which has loads of adverts as well as the monthly subscription cost. For programmes on the non BBC channels I either record them and then watch later FWDing through the ads, or I buy the BD boxsets of the series. COmmercial radio, I don't listen to, I listen to BBC radio. I can't help it, I simply hate advertisments.

1
0
Silver badge

Re: I sometimes wish to doG the BBC would open up a studio in Sydney.

As part of the deal over Scottish independence I think we get Australia back, so it could happen.

1
0

Well thanks El Reg, this was the first time I'd heard it was available in 3D. I had seen the beeb plugging it endlessly, but no mention of 3Dability. I shall look forward to watching that when I get home on my 3D TV :-) (missed it at the weekend first time round due to freezing my ass of in a foreign country and being at a friends for dinner when it was on)

0
0

Cooking etc.

I thought of a simple fix for the BBC license fee argument a little while ago.

Clearly it's difficult to please everybody, there will always be some who argue that they don't want "their" licence fee money going towards a show they don't like. e.g. I think we spend far too much money on Masterchef.

If a show is popular, as indeed the cooking and baking shows appear to be, they should have a limited run on the BBC. Perhaps 2 or, at most, 3 series. After that, the BBC should be contractually obliged to sell it off to the highest bidder.

This indirectly happened with Jonathan Ross when he left the Beeb for unrelated reasons. His chat show is now on ITV, with the same bad jokes. License payers are no longer paying Ross's inflated wages.

Shows like Masterchef, Apprentice, Top Gear, Bake off and Eastenders would all be gone to another terrestrial broadcaster. It happens with sport, why not drama and reality?

The funds received from selling off the successful shows could go towards paying for new television to replace it.

Most of these shows are now "made by xyz for BBC" so there is no reason quality should drop as a result of it changing channel. We'd just start saving money.

4
6

Re: Cooking etc.

> We'd just start saving money.

Is it cheaper to keep building new production teams to come up with new ideas than it is to continue to make episodes of older ideas which can then be sold internationally?

1
0
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Cooking etc.

Yes, that's great - use the BBC as a proving ground for Sky.

Most of what I watch is on 4 or five, and they're always under the threat of their programming disappearing off to satellite (I quite enjoyed the first few series of House, for example).

0
1

Re: Cooking etc.

'This indirectly happened with Jonathan Ross when he left the Beeb for unrelated reasons. His chat show is now on ITV, with the same bad jokes. License payers are no longer paying Ross's inflated wages.'

Before Ross I never imagined you could make so much money from trying too hard.

0
0

Re: Cooking etc.

No, not Sky...I said another terrestrial broadcaster. It would be important to keep the shows free to air.

0
0

Re: Cooking etc.

"Is it cheaper to keep building new production teams to come up with new ideas than it is to continue to make episodes of older ideas which can then be sold internationally?"

If the shows can be sold internationally, then the rights to them would have considerable value if sold.

Building new productions teams to come up with new ideas isn't cheap, that's why we pay the license fee, right?

0
1
MJI
Silver badge

Re: Cooking etc.

A lot of these shows make a profit

Top Gear does

Doctor WHo does

0
0
Bronze badge

An interesting concept, but the lack of ads on the Beeb is still remarkably compelling. I know most of the time ads are just

4
0

re:adverts

I get your point regarding adverts on commercial channels but don't most people just skip through adverts on their PVR these days? What proportion of people still watch TV live?

0
0

Yes stop wasting my licence fee money on 3DTV please Mr Beeb.

Start wasting it on 4KTV instead immediately. Oh, you are already planning it? OK.

0
0

Original DOG

The DOG was originally developed to add Action Replay to the first slow motion System. The developers wanted to call it the Action Replay Symbol Equipment - unfortunately the management caught on!

3
0

Unwanted tech

I have a 3D-TV. I only bought it because the retailer was flogging them off cheap because hardly anyone wants 3D.

The stereoscopic glasses are still in their wrapping.

5
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.