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back to article Mystery traffic redirection attack pulls net traffic through Belarus, Iceland

Tons of internet traffic is being deliberately diverted through locations including Belarus and Iceland, and intercepted by crooks or worse, security experts fear. Network intelligence firm Renesys warns that victims including financial institutions, VoIP providers, and governments have been targeted by the man-in-the-middle …

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Anonymous Coward

Surprise!

Why is it that when we see the word "exploit" or the phrase "security problems/issues", the article is always about Microsoft.

People need to give themselves a shake and stop using MS products!

YES I AM THAT STUPID THANKS FOR ASKING!!!

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Re: Surprise!

I take it that reading comprehension is not your strong point?

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Re: Surprise!

But is isn't about Microsoft? They're not even mentioned.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Surprise!

I'm Twelve Years Old and What is This?

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Re: Surprise! (not Really it's Eadon by another name)

You are correct he did not read the article, that anonymous coward was really Eadon using another fake user name. That was almost word for word from an old post from Eadon.

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Re: Surprise! (not Really it's Eadon by another name)

If it had been Eadon, it would have ended with some stupid shit like:

"MS MAN IN THE MIDDLE FAIL!" or such drivel. Its just someone who doesn't know how to RTFA.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Surprise!

> But is isn't about Microsoft? They're not even mentioned.

I assume his post was meant to parody someone else. Unfortunately he's pretty rubbish at it.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Surprise! (not Really it's Eadon by another name)

Do not feed the troll. Do not even acknowledge that the troll once existed.

That is all.

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Trollface

Re: Surprise! (not Really it's Eadon by another name)

I CAN'T BELIEVE IT'S NOT EADON

Our New I Can’t Believe It’s Not Eadon!® Deliciously Simple™ comment spread is made from real, simple ingredients like flaming, troll oil and inappropriate Microsoft Rage. 100% rant, 0% artificial intelligence.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Surprise!

It's Government sponsored, NSA and GCHQ flexing their muscles.

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FAIL

Re: Surprise!

Why is it that when we see the word "exploit" or the phrase "security problems/issues", the article is always about Microsoft.

Look, I enjoy bashing the hell out of Mickeysoft, but, if you even had the smallest bit of understanding how internet traffic gets routed globally; then you would have realized that your diatribe was completely full of shit. End of story!!

Take Mickeysoft out to the woodshed and give them the 'shellacking' they truly deserve; when they screw up; but this is not one of those instances.

Go back to school!

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Re: Surprise!

I take it that reading comprehension is not your strong point?

Probably because this poster is still in grammar school.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Surprise!

>I assume his post was meant to parody someone else. Unfortunately he's pretty rubbish at it.

I don't know. He seems to startled a number of foolish self-important people into a conversation. I think that demonstrates some skill at composition.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Surprise! (not Really it's Eadon by another name)

You guys got it all wrong, it wasn't Microsoft products that allowed these attacks, it was Balmer doing these attacks from his laptop (Apple with Windoze 8.1 with a Ubuntu VM).

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Re: Surprise! (not Really it's Eadon by another name)

It's that bloody damned volcano acting out again.

First, it fucks up all of European air traffic, now it's mucking about with the network traffic!

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Everybody above this line

Has been trolled.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Everybody above this line

Pretty successfully if I do say so myself! It's satire mother fuckers!!! (as I believe Noel Coward once said.)

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Re: Everybody above this line

Lions 7, Christians 4, by my count. Looks like a few Reg readers need to go back to Internet school.

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Yes AC @14:15. We all know the router division at Microsoft is to blame. I blame severe under-staffing. It's currently at zero.

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> It's currently at zero.

Whoa, that's understaffing.

And not only that, but Microsoft wasn't mentioned in the article at all. I suppose the Microsoft article division is to blame here?

What? Oh, they're understaffed too? Dang it.

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Anonymous Coward

I bet the NSA & CGHQ are pissed... someone else inspecting all that data before they did, who knows what opportunities to steal good comercial data they missed out on there.

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Rob
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Who's to say...

... it's not them doing the redirects to a few trusted sites they have that aren't in their home territories to avoid suspicion.

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Joke

@obnoxiousGit

'Tis Snowden snooping on his old employer with the help of new friends.

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Anonymous Coward

This is what happens when you use Linux.

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Anonymous Coward

Sjeez - now THIS is sad. Now even the quality of the trolling is in decline. *Please* make an effort.

You didn't mention some creative use of vulnerabilities to show Linux is much unsafer than Windows, you didn't express adoration for great philanthropist Bill Gates, I mean, WTF? Kindly do it properly, your trolling is, well, pathetic is the only word for it.

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Black Helicopters

Nice sales pitch at the end...

"Everyone on the internet ... should now be monitoring the global routing of their advertised IP prefixes"

With the subtext of "which we'll be happy to provide. For a fee, of course..."

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Black Helicopters

Re: Nice sales pitch at the end...

I was wondering if I ought to tell my eighty-two year old aunt to start monitoring the IP packets between her and the local WI. After all, that recipe for plum jam may be hijacked and stolen.

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Facepalm

Re: Nice sales pitch at the end...

After all, that recipe for plum jam may be hijacked and stolen.

Well, now that you've told them about it...

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Upstreams should _always_ filter announcements.

That's it.

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Datacentre Question

Who has any datacenters in either of these countries ? Google, NSA, GCHQ, The Chinese, Al Qeada ?

Someone is in control of the routeurs through which this data is being read/siphoned/spied upon...., who ?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Datacentre Question

I can't speak for Iceland but for Belarus, I would think it's the home of the "Russian Business Network" and half of the worlds spammers and trojan creators.

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Alert

Re: Datacentre Question

Belarus - Dictatorship, allied to Russia, known for human rights abuses, internet criminals, pumping spam and being Europe's last old school Toatlitarian regime.

Iceland - Democracy, member of NATO, not overly friendly with the US (offered asylum to Snowden), friendly with the EU (but not part of it), not so friendly with the UK (Cod wars and the collapse of Iclandic banks). Not known for internet criminals and pumping spam. Known for being an awesome looking place that you would love to visit if it wasnt so damn far away.

Not really seeing any group that would likely be friendly with both of those countries...

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Re: Datacentre Question

Assuming it needs friendly. Easy enough to set up a front company without the government knowing. For added points, throw in a couple of badly-forged documents and load the computer with a banking trojan and list of credit cards - that way if you do get caught, it looks like just another criminal gang was behind it.

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Re: Datacentre Question

Iceland - Democracy, member of NATO, not overly friendly with the US (offered asylum to Snowden ...,

and Bobby Fischer before him. Based only on those two facts and the film 101 Reykjavik, it seems like a good place.

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Paris Hilton

Re: Datacentre Question

you forgot the egregious Bjork, that androgynous alien with a screeching voice that thinks it's Art.

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Coat

Re: Datacentre Question

You think it was Bjork? I find that hard to believe.

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Thumb Up

Re: Datacentre Question

Don't forget the home of the wonderful CCP Games...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Datacentre Question

"Belarus - Dictatorship" In your opinion, or rather, the phrase you are parroting from some politically-backed media manipulators. The population don't seem to think so, and kind of like that he isn't kowtowing to the global economic slash and burn project.

"Allied to Russia" Yes. it's right next to Russia, and they can mostly all speak Russian. You want it to be allied to Mexico or something?

"Known for human rights abuses" like supporting the population presumably and not selling off public assets to foreign multinationals. No mention of Ukraine where they are currently imprisoning Yulia Tymoshenko?

"Internet criminals" ORLY ? Last I saw they were mostly making trucks, tractors, footwear and doing programming for Western companies.

"Pumping spam" and the largest countries in the world pumping spam are ...... oh let's guess. Yours?

" and being Europe's last old school Toatlitarian regime." They are not in the EU. They appear to support their population much better than many of the poor countries in the EU. And since they have strengthned ties wih Russia, to protect themselves from economic or political attacks from the west, any hopes of implementing some kind of foreign-backed bankers' coup, are pretty much pie in the sky.

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Facepalm

Re: Datacentre Question

The population don't seem to think so

What.

Look, I know where you are coming from. But this is not an East-vs-West question. Belarus would be better off with less Lukashenko (did he authorize mapping the Chernobyl exclusion zone on Belarus side yet?), but that is indeed not a matter of US foreign policy. Let me cite Ron Paul:

Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the “Belarus Democracy Act” reauthorization. This title of this bill would have amused George Orwell, as it is in fact a US regime-change bill. ... I strongly object to the sanctions that this legislation imposes on Belarus. We must keep in mind that sanctions and blockades of foreign countries are considered acts of war. Do we need to continue war-like actions against yet another country? Can we afford it? I wish to emphasize that I take this position not because I am in support of the regime in Belarus, or anywhere else. I take this position because it is dangerous folly to be the nation that arrogates to itself the right to determine the leadership of the rest of the world. As we teeter closer to bankruptcy, it should be more obvious that we need to change our foreign policy to one of constructive engagement rather than hostile interventionism. And though it scarcely should need to be said, I must remind my colleagues today that we are the U.S. House of Representatives, and not some sort of world congress. We have no constitutional authority to intervene in the wholly domestic affairs of Belarus or any other sovereign nation.

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Re: Datacentre Question

Definitely not Bjork. Bjork can manipulate IP routing with her mind. She doesn't need no stinkin' BGP advertisements.

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Anonymous Coward

Where's "rate this article gone"?

This one gets 11 out of 10 just for the subtitle.

Everybody, look what's going down.

Have a good weekend, brothers and sisters.

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Pint

Re: Where's "rate this article gone"?

You get an up vote for knowing the Buffs (all the way back from '67 - when I was but a callow 17yr old...)

Come to think of it, kudos to Mr Leyden, too.

Now where's that "ageing hippie" icon?

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Anonymous Coward

So...

"... financial institutions, VoIP providers, and governments have been targeted."

Sounds OK to me.

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Anonymous Coward

Russia helped with "outing" what the NSA was doing, is Russia getting "outed" now?

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Noticeable Latency Increase?

As a Comcast subscriber, that would be "Hmm, it's been about 15 minutes now..."

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Good luck with Síminn

Good luck with Síminn, they don't like to provide answers if you are not a customers of there and even then it can sometimes be difficult (I am a customer of Síminn in Iceland).

What The Register can do is to contact pfs.is and ask for answers there. They are the monitoring body for Iceland communications and rules. They might provide some answers by asking Síminn the right questions that needs to be answered in this case.

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Pint

When BGP *can* fail ...

... it simply means that "News" is unreliable always, but Journalism, with corroboration, is as pure as newly driven snow.

Eat, Drink and over collect metadata for tomorrow the S/N ratio might go down.

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WTF?

"Well, we'll not risk another frontal assault. That rabbit's dynamite."

So, as of yet we are unsure whether dark and nefarious activities are indeed afoot or whether we are in the presence of pure accident biggened up by a Security Company pushing its wares.

We are, however, sure that the current BGP exhibits all the syndromes of being no longer appropriate to the 21st century seeing that anything can be advertised by anyone with no traceability or justification.

Better get some protocol druids on the same table and bang heads together pronto.

Yeah, instead we get monetizable advances like new TLD domain names ending in ".cocacola" and sh*t.

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At what point do we say 'Right, let's start again?'

And this time build an internet that's just a tiny bit more secure than the one we have got?

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Anonymous Coward

I'm Still Missing Something

Another Register article with no direct Dr Who reference.

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