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back to article BAD ALTITUDE: The highs and lows of Doctor Who

The Doctor’s many visits to Earth have seen him not only venture around the globe but also far above and below its surface. Early on he was high in the Pamir Mountains, the highest peak of which reaches 7,495m, although the pass in which the travellers first met Marco Polo was probably nearer 4,200m — high enough for the elderly …

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an anomaly 183m above sea level

Obviously, they kept building for the same reason the bells aren't hung from the top of church towers; they want them to stay up. All that noise and vibration at critical end-points? Nah...

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Re: No Shard?

I think you'll find that the Shard is that Shard shaped object, 3rd from the right.

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Anonymous Coward

Ah, that kind of low

And there was me expecting to see the McCoy period as the ultimate low point :)

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Re: Ah, that kind of low

Not Bonnie Langford?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Ah, that kind of low

Absolutely, plus the theme tune, the horrible 80s cover of a spectrum game graphics, that whole period rolled into one!

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Bah!

You have a calibration error in that drawing. When I left the UK in mid '84 they were still using non-metric measurements for everything except petrol and packaged food.

Those mines and undersea bits on the left should be labeled in yards and fathoms. Not only that, there is no double decker bus shown for height comparison.

Also: How far away is Skaro? I imagine that it represents a data point that swings way above the Empire State Building and way below the bottom of Loch Ness on a given day. By episode two all these data points are moot.

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Re: "How far away is Skaro?"

Maybe the first few words of the article will explain why that wasn't included...

"The Doctor’s many visits to Earth..."

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Re: Bah!

"When I left the UK in mid '84 they were still using non-metric measurements for everything except petrol and packaged food."

We still are, which is all the more surprising when you realise that schools stopped teaching the old system in 1972 (?) and therefore most of the population have been taught only to use centimetres, grams and litres (Well, actually I was taught to use grammes. Perhaps one of you youngsters can tell me when teachers finally caved in on the spelling.)

But the French still seem to use livres in their supermarkets, so there's no rush.

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Is this a series of articles

or an extended advert for the authors book?

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Re: Is this a series of articles

If there are many more articles, we'll be able to print all the charts from them and won't need to buy the book!

(err.. that's not a complaint about the number of articles - greatly enjoying them!)

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Intersting series of articles...

...apart from these last two. This one feels like scraping the bottom of the barrel for the left overs to fill out the authors book. The one on K-9 seemed like a tenuous link at best since it dealt mainly with the current developments in the field of robotics with little actual mention of K-9 other than as some sort of ideal benchmark.

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Graphic

Doesn't it belong in a game of Scramble?

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