back to article Nanowire laser is a GaAs, GaAs, GaAs (with a bit of arsenic)

A group of researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) is showing off nanowire-based lasers, as part of the microelectronics world's ongoing search for the best way to integrate electronics and photonics. The research, described in a Nature Photonics paper (abstract) led by Professor Chennupati Jagadish, demonstrates …

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Pint

another potential benefit

Global interconnects take multiple clock cycles due to propagation delay. My vague recollection is that the propagation speed is ~0.3c (due to the RC coefficients). If the conversion to and from photons is fast enough, this kind of thing could unblock one of the major limits on processor scaling, allowing bigger/badder cores with better single-thread performance.

Anyway, always cool to see this kind of fundamental work going on.

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Windows

Re: another potential benefit

Your right, ±0.3 C in unshielded wire but ±0.9 C if shielded.

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Silver badge

I said fricken' sharks.

Not fricken' goldfish.

Hey, I guess a laser-toting neon tetra could be pretty cool though.

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Re: I said fricken' sharks.

Upvoted for laser-toting neon tetras.

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Boffin

Re: I said fricken' sharks.

The laser-toting tetras against the laser-wielding guppies...? Oh yeah, I approve of that sort of entertainment. Even if I have to put on these here lab goggles to watch it safely. Well, especially then. Ooooh, and can we have an interactive, PvP version...?

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so now i can have..

Nano lasers for my micro-fische.

Ahhhhaha get it, Micro Fish, oh alright, I'll get my jacket...

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Thumb Up

Clever mfg tech. But they talk about IR lasing in sub 1micrometre geometries

It's clever but the question the question is how well does it fit into a chip fab process flow.?

Thumbs up for practical work.

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