back to article Apple releases previously SECRET OPERATING SYSTEM SOURCE CODE

The Computer History Museum has scored something of a coup, publishing – with Cupertino's permission – the source code for the Apple II's DOS, version 3.1. The archeological code, posted here, is the whole 4,000-plus – that's thousands of lines of code, not millions in a misprint – complete with comments like “if it ain't 3 don' …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

OK

So, where did I put my QEMU 6502 emulator? :-)

1
0
Silver badge
Coat

Re: OK

Next to the Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator?

That's mine with the carrots. ---------------->>

3
0
Anonymous Coward

How times have changed. 4,000 lines was a lot in the late 70's. Now, if you go to school to be a programmer, 4,000 lines is something you do as a project for a grade. How times have changed.

6
0
Silver badge

Or even just a single page of a website.

1
0

Yes, but we didn't have cut/paste back then.

1
0

Oh dear, really?

I can clearly recall using it back in the mid-70s and if you check out Ritchie and Thompson's June 1970 memo describing the QED editor, you'll find it there too...

1
0
Silver badge

I can clearly recall using [copy and paste] back in the mid-70s and if you check out Ritchie and Thompson's June 1970 memo describing the QED editor, you'll find it there too...

Agreed (though I suspect the post you're responding to was meant as a joke). The IBM mainframe editors had copy&paste since at least the mid-70s, with SPF (the precursor to ISPF), and I suspect the pre-SPF TSO editor had it as well, which would push it back to '71. I don't know whether early editors for, say, CMS or MTS supported copy/paste; it'd be interesting to hear from folks who used them. (I used VM/CMS in the late '80s, but never the early CP-branded versions.)

1
0
Silver badge

Writtten for 13,000

That's about 46,000 in today's money.

http://www.halfhill.com/inflation.html

1
1
Def
Bronze badge

Re: Writtten for 13,000

Not bad for three months work.

1
0
Stop

Ho, hum

Not ProDOS, not GS/OS, not System 7, nor A/UX... heaven forbid that NewtonOS 2.1's intimates should become public for viewing! No, gentlemen (and Ladies, too): this jewel that adorns this latest crown* in the Computer Museum collection is purely unadulterated cubic zirconium.

Let sleeping 6502s lie.

(* The crown is a conical volume, gilded with quasi-open Darwin, studded with 1.8-carat WebKit, and was last seen half-buried under PPC code that litters Dogcow's litterbox...)

1
3
Silver badge

I am all over that.

The first time I got paid for writing software was for that machine. Hard to believe, but it was fancy back then. I loved it.

I have to find that code and take a peek ... or maybe a poke.

3
0
Bronze badge

Microsoft knew where to shove it...

well, shove a pretty picture onto the screen so you could click away to your hearts content.

whoo would have thought one clicky picture laid top/around a few thousand lines of code was to be worth 100's billions of dollars?

1
1
Bronze badge

Steve Wozniak?

Isn't he the guy that helped Steve Jobs build the first Apple computer?

3
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Steve Wozniak?

Didn't you mean Wozn't he?

3
0

"Beneath Apple DOS"

"Beneath Apple DOS" was the definitive work on how to communicate with Apple DOS 3.3. iIRC it included complete disassembly with comments. Through the Apple //e one could buy a printed copy of the original source code for the monitor ROM (what people call BIOS these days). Was $10 for the //e. Was essential for understanding why characters were dropped at 1200 baud when the //e 80 column screen scrolled (bug in firmware disabled IRQ at the wrong time). Once I understood the problem I found it pretty easy to write work-alike routine which did not disable IRQ yet used the same working variables as the firmware so if something I had no control over wrote to the screen it wrote in the right place and my next write followed.

1
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums