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back to article Rogue US-Israeli cyberwar weapon 'infected Russian nuclear plant'

Stuxnet - the famous worm widely credited with crippling the Iranian nuclear weapons programme for several years - also infected the internal network of a Russian nuclear plant. Unspecified malware has even reached the International Space Station, according to the boss of Russian anti-virus firm Kaspersky Lab. Eugene Kaspersky …

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news?

Slow news day? Someone involved selling anti virus software heard from someone down the pub that someone got a virus.

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@Mr ChriZ

"Slow news day? Someone involved selling anti virus software heard from someone down the pub that someone got a virus".

But Mr ChriZ, haven't you heard? That's not idle gossip-mongering; that's ***intelligence gathering***.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: news?

'The charismatic securityware businessman'?

Really?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: news?

Security Software companies can never be seen to have defeated their enemy, they need headlines like this and the fear associated with it to perpetuate their very existence.

Wouldn't surprise me if there happens to be a low malware virus news day they throw a few of their own concoctions out into the wild.

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"Cyberterrorism"

This is clearly a systematic attack of "cyberterrorism" as people who know little about security, computing, networks or the novels of William Gibson tend to call it.

As such, I believe the established US government doctrine is that nations that are harmed by these attacks have the right to bomb and/or invade the nation(s) responsible for them. Have I got that right?

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Paris Hilton

Re: "Cyberterrorism"

I thought its a fight against terror if the US Govt is involved?

... Fight against terror doesn't equal fight for freedom.

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Re: "Cyberterrorism"

"the right to bomb and/or invade the nation(s) responsible for them..."

True, however it isn't always wise to assert that right, innit.

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Nya

Flash

Was I the only one who thought what were the Russians doing moving flash drives back and forth between their plants and the Iranian ones?

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Re: Flash

Ahhhhhh Hhhhhhha!

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Re: Flash

Not really, the plant is by Russian design partly run by Russians or so I've read a couple of years ago.

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Re: Flash

Will he save every one of us ?

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Re: Flash

A short sharp swift google of "stuxnet" will get you any number of sites where it is defined and available, while "stuxnet source code" will get you disassembled code. It's everywhere.

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Well we know who built Stuxnet

I suggest that the governments affected sue the perpetrators from orbit. This kind of collateral damage could have been prevented had the original developers actually targeted their attack.

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Paris Hilton

Re: Well we know who built Stuxnet

They can just impound the ISS.

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Although a (modern) Stuxnet infection indicates poor computer hygiene, unmodified Stuxnet won't cause any actual damage unless you're running specific SCADA hardware and software.

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Is nothing compared to the epidemic of tcpip.sys - which is everywhere it seems....thankfully Kaspersky is well on top of it...

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Anonymous Coward

So what did I learn from this

Perhaps nothing, perhaps something. Education in poor countries still matters. Off the record, with a beer, is still more giving. Bureaucracy is slow. Linux is more secure than Windows. Flash drives are as secure as used condoms. Nobody knows everything. And apparently Australians have the ability to either speak Australian or English. Most men with a name need a hair cut, Note to my self, shut up.

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"Hallo, ich bin eine Amerikan Mathematik-Professor!"

Were you recently exposed to,

http://notalwayslearning.com/down-blunder/32707

(which possibly I have given away)

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Coat

Read the title and expected a story on how the Russians were stupid enough to use windows to control a nuke plant

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No surprise

Surely we already knew from Independence Day that space craft are peculiarly vulnerable to computer viruses.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: No surprise

The aliens are vulnerable too. In other news, the miners in the Andromeda galaxy got their machinery infected by Stuxnet via infected twit from Justin Biber.

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Re: No surprise

Of course, HG Wells got there first - the Martians in War of the Worlds succumbed to Earthly bacteria. You'd have thought they'd have had their jabs before venturing across the void.

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Re: No surprise

Don't you mean Justin Biber _is_ a twit? I don't know how he could infect the Andromeda miners, but anything's possible in this mad world.

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stupidity knows no national boundaries

"The malware apparently got into the air-gapped network of the nuke plant on an infected USB stick." oh dear oh dear. Someone show them how to use a sheepdip. Please, I do not want a space station spinning out of control and crashing through my roof.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: stupidity knows no national boundaries

I wouldn't worry about the ISS falling out of the sky - The general purpose laptops on board are just that, they have no control over the life support or guidance systems of the station.

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Happy

Lets face it

it was more than air gapped…..

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NSA outage soon then?

sshsshshshshshhshshshshshs

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Anonymous Coward

It's not difficult!

Don't use USB Drives! Don't surf to that dodgy site, you don't need to see a pic of Jub, open page 3!

Safety comes first, simple as that.

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The same people who open phishing scam sites opened this one. :-)

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Holmes

So *not* so carefully targetted as was originally thought.

Shocker.

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