back to article Rackspace hurries out 'Solum', a half-formed platform cloud project

Second-tier cloud operator Rackspace has launched yet another OpenStack project, this time seeking to tear up the nascent platform-as-a-service market. "Project Solum" was announced by Rackspace architect Adrian Otto on Wednesday and sees his company - along with partners eBay, RedHat, Ubuntu, dotCloud, and Cloudsoft and …

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Whatever.

Windows doesn't have LXC and OpenStack is going to kill it.

MS' only hope is to use their financial resources and offer Azure (running LXC in the background, on Linux) for free and cross their fingers.

Unfortunately for Ballmer, he was right. And his developers, developers, developers speech was spot on.

Pity it was just marketing blurb.

Good luck with Hyper-V.

sheluser, jdk and that other MS shill, wake up. I've been programming exclusively MS since the Quick languages (look 'em up) but enough is enough.

I had a look at the VS2013 release - MVC5, just playing catchup with Nancy (a great framework), but still not even in the same ballpark as node.

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First of all, our announcement today was not about a finished product. It was an email sent to OpenStack developers about a joint development effort that numerous companies have agreed to work on together. The project features a development dream team of experts in this space. You missed the most interesting part that this is the first time that a collaboration of this type has been started with no code. It will be designed and developed completely in the open from the very beginning, with only a shared vision to start with. That's because we trust and value the open design philosophy of the OpenStack development community.

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core components of the service, such as networking, remain critically unstable

Citation needed.

I have no problems with networking or any other core components of Open Stack that I use.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: core components of the service, such as networking, remain critically unstable

Stable? Yeah, I guess so.

Fast? Hell no.

How about the fact that openstack inserts veth pairs between what the VM thinks is its ethernet driver and the hypervisor. Net effect? There are nine (nine!!) layers between the VM virtual NIC and the physical network. (Source: http://docs.openstack.org/network-admin/admin/content/under_the_hood_openvswitch.html). This is purely an artifact of OpenStack - can't blame the oddities of hypervisor for that one.

Or the fact that OpenStack doesn't support SR-IOV for fast networking cutthrough on hosts with modern NICs?

Openstack has a ton of potential, but right now, all I seem to be running into is roadblocks.

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Gold badge

Re: core components of the service, such as networking, remain critically unstable

Openstack doesn't have to be balls-to-the-wall fast and take advantage of every single feature or eek out every single % of performance. It needs to be "good enough". It needs to provide freedom from lockin and - most of all - a means to escape the "just one more license" fetish that companies like Microsoft have.

The "best" technology doesn't always win. Now go cuy in your betamax. I'm going to spin up a cloud whose software costs don't go up 15%+ per year.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: core components of the service, such as networking, remain critically unstable

I'd modulate that comment to "it just has to be good enough...and improving enough". This is the lesson from Microsoft's history: a bit weak to begin with but improving continually until its perfectly serviceable. You can do the rapid improvement only if you have the freedom to develop rapidly. O/S has to tread *incredibly* carefully here - it's very easy to succumb to Second System effect, or have the pace of development squeezed out of it by all the founding members' interests. We shall see.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: core components of the service, such as networking, remain critically unstable

@Mr. point n'click

There are DIY "clouds" that are fast and free (FOSS). OpenStack looks good on paper. But until it really is point n'click, IMHO, it's better to DIY from a performance and management POV.

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