back to article HP: Classic storage? Nah. They'll eat glommed store+serve gloop in '14

At its San Francisco analyst day event, HP CEO Meg Whitman laid out the main points of the tech giant's storage strategy – and it looks like "traditional" storage is no longer a priority. 3PAR (StoreServ) StoreOnce deduping arrays StoreAll object storage The 3PAR product line is HP's now largest storage contributor, according …

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26% drop in sales?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/07/11/hp_prepping_fix_for_latest_storage_vuln/

"HP admits to backdoors in storage products"

It's a wonder their sales only dropped 26%.

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Anonymous Coward

37 per cent increase in sales ?

The security story you link to was a bit of filler for a slow news week at El Reg..

"converged storage system revenues were $333 million in the third quarter, 37 per cent more than a year ago, with traditional storage revenues being $500, a fall of 26 per cent year-on-year."

They're growing converged storage faster than traditional storage is falling off, which means they're taking someone else's share.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 37 per cent increase in sales ?

No, 33% growth results $333 million means $90 million growth from last year, and also 26% fall results $500 means $180 million drop.

So growth rate is a about half against shrink.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 37 per cent increase in sales ?

Your arithmetic is incorrect.

If converged grew 37%, that's a growth from $243->$333, which was a an increase of $90M.

If traditional declined 26%, that's a decline from $675 -> $500, which was a decrease of $175M.

Therefore, HP's storage has declined $175-$90 = $85 Million

To put it another way, HP's combined storage business has shrunk from $918M down to $833M, a 10% y/y decline.

Whether they are losing share or not should be compared to the industry rate of growth.

That the industry is growing in the combined (converged+traditional) in this space 4% year/year indicates that HP has serious market share issues and is losing its installed base.

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Anonymous Coward

Memristor promises are directly proportional to the absence of any other HP news. With business perking up (in a fashion), there's less need to promise nothing and besides there's the wonder of Moonshot to replace it.

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Anonymous Coward

moonshot is expensive rubbish, I'm afraid. The use case for this is significantly limited and the cost for the compute in a design of this nature - price/performance - doesn't come close to other integrated designs.

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Anonymous Coward

I think maybe this comment is a bit premature. HP's moonshot server isn't even designed to be a general compute server. The whole concept turns the traditional method of datacenter design on it's head. Instead of purchasing servers that you then cram as many apps as possible on (via virtualization), moonshot offers hardware tailored to the specific application or workload you plan to run. When considered in light of this design, this new design style has endless possibilities. Price/performance is actually going to be phenomenal.

Moonshot isn't a server; it's an idea, a design, a "new style of IT" as HP puts it. The server cartridge that goes in it is the beauty of the design. Currently there is one server offering for the moonshot design. It's a cartridge that was purpose built for workloads like web hosting. If you are thinking to use it for some different type of application/workload, chances are slim that you'd be impressed. It's designed as a low compute solution that runs on minimial power, handling very light workloads that need to be repeated over and over again. Like a website getting hit over and over again. If you are running this type of workload on tradition IT right now (at a fairly large scale), then moonshot's benefits are EXTRAORDINARY. If this isn't a workload you are needing a solution for, you should continue with traditional servers until HP announces a new cartridge that fits the workload you had in mind. Once that happens, you'd see incredible density at a much lower TCO because of the way the hardware is tailored to your specific workload.

Years down the road, when moonshot offers dozens and dozens of server cartridge options, covering all types of workloads and applications, this style of IT will probably dominate the datacenter. HP Moonshot is still in early stages of launch. It's barely taken off, certainly hasn't left Earth, and is not yet approaching the moon. But the journey has begun. I think this is something to watch closely in the coming months and years.

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